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  • The DDC network includes practitioner organizations, operating foundations, and academic researchers
  • This is the challenge – and opportunity – we all face, no matter what kinds of organizations we lead or belong to
  • Sometimes this means action by citizens that is seeded by gov’t with small grants
  • Don’t forget fun!
  • Rio Grande do Sol - http://blogs.worldbank.org/publicsphere/node/5998
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
  • “Embedded in the DNA of online tools are two values: democracy and transparency”
  • Change slide
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide
  • Refer to Using Online Tools guide

Rochester leadership institute slides Rochester leadership institute slides Presentation Transcript

  • STRATEGIES TO ENCOURAGE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT Rochester, NY June 18th, 2014
  • THE DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY CONSORTIUM
  • THE CONTEXT FOR ENGAGEMENT: HOW HAVE CITIZENS* CHANGED?  More educated  More skeptical – different attitudes toward authority  Have less time to spare  Better able to find resources, allies, information (Internet) * citizens = residents, people
  • THE CONTEXT: FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN  Have the most at stake in community success  More motivation to engage, but even less time  Want to engage in community, not just politics
  • THE CONTEXT: INCREASED USE OF THE INTERNET Available free for download at BIT.LY/IWJGQN
  • THREE MINUTES AT THE MICROPHONE Retrieved from Cincinnati.com, July 27, 2012
  • “What drove me to try planned, structured public engagement was my awful experience with unplanned, unstructured public engagement.” ─ John Nalbandian, former mayor, Lawrence, KS
  • TREATING CITIZENS LIKE ADULTS Give them:  Information  Chance to tell their story  Choices  Legitimacy  Chances to take action  Good process  Food and fun!
  • SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT  Map community networks;  Involve leaders of those networks;  ‘Who is least likely to participate?’  Use online as well as f2f connections;  Follow up!
  • SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: SMALL-GROUP PROCESSES  No more than 12 people per group;  Facilitator who is impartial (doesn’t give opinions);  Start with people describing their experiences;  Lay out options;  Help people plan for action.
  • SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: FRAMING AN ISSUE  Give people the information they need, in ways they can use it  Lays out several options or views (including ones you don’t agree with)  Trust them to make good decisions
  • SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: ENCOURAGING CITIZEN ACTION
  • “Sometimes you need a meeting that is also a party. Sometimes you need a party that is also a meeting.” Gloria Rubio-Cortès, National Civic League SUCCESSFUL TACTIC: FUN
  • “PORTSMOUTH LISTENS” PORTSMOUTH, NH  Ongoing process since 2000  Several hundred participants each time  Addressed a number of major policy decisions: bullying in schools, school redistricting, city’s master plan, balancing city budget, whether to build new middle school
  • JANE ADDAMS SCHOOL FOR DEMOCRACY WEST SIDE OF ST. PAUL, MN  50-200 people in “neighborhood learning circles” every month since 1998  Involves recent Hmong, Latino, Somali immigrants  Young people involved in circles and other activities  Cultural exchanges - food, crafts, storytelling  Has resulted in new projects, initiatives, festivals, and change in INS policy
  • DECATUR NEXT DECATUR, GA
  • PARTICIPATORY BUDGETING IN BRAZILIAN CITIES  Commitment from gov’t to adopt budget;  Wide range of ways to be involved;  A carnival atmosphere;  Started small, now huge – 60,000+ people
  • QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS?
  • HOW MUCH IS THE INTERNET CHANGING HOW YOU DO ENGAGEMENT?
  • DIGITAL DIVIDES (PLURAL)  Overall, Internet access growing  Different people use different hardware  Different people go to different places on the Internet  Communities just as complex online as off
  • What online tools can do: Help citizens gather data
  • What online tools can do: Help people generate and rank ideas
  • What online tools can do: Help people visualize options
  • What online tools can do: Help sustain community connections
  • COMMON MISTAKES  Treating Internet as a one-way medium  Not enough recruitment  Transparency without proactive engagement  Gathering ideas and not implementing them
  • STRENGTHS OF DELIBERATIVE ENGAGEMENT  Making policy decisions, plans, budgets  Catalyzing citizen action  Rebuilding trust, fostering new leadership
  • WHY SUSTAINED ENGAGEMENT? Increases in:  Trust  Efficiency  Equity  Connectedness …which increases:  Economic growth  Public health
  • TWO ASSUMPTIONS TO RECONSIDER 1. Government is the only problem-solver
  • TWO ASSUMPTIONS TO RECONSIDER 2. It is the job of government to sustain participation
  • WORKING GROUP ON LEGAL FRAMEWORKS FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
  •  Broad and non-exclusive definition of public participation  No mandates – model is ADR  Principles for successful public participation  Possible use of commission or other agency at local government level  No reference to changing sunshine laws as usually a matter for state legislature  Best use: to start a discussion about how you want participation to work in your municipality LOCAL PUBLIC PARTICIPATION ORDINANCE
  • Available free for download at BIT.LY/1F2MGAP/
  • Participation commissions or advisory boards can:  Develop multi-year participation plans  Develop guidelines on when/how participation should happen  Assess and evaluation current participation efforts  Provide annual report to council on status of participation  Help strengthen networks for recruitment PUTTING THESE TACTICS TO USE: PARTICIPATION COMMISSIONS AND ADVISORY BOARDS
  •  Stronger networks, online and off, for recruitment and dissemination of information  Better use of social media to raise interest, discussion before and between meetings  Clear avenues for public to present ideas for the agenda  At the meeting (or as a pre-meeting), a format featuring small-group discussions  Proposed guideline: Electeds cannot vote, act, or make decisions until information from meeting is made public PUTTING THESE TACTICS TO USE: BETTER FORMATS FOR PUBLIC MEETINGS
  •  Larger assumption to discuss: What is government’s role in supporting participation?  One office – or participation skills distributed throughout departments?  Training opportunities  Need for principles, protocols, and metrics to guide the work PUTTING THESE TACTICS TO USE: PARTICIPATION STAFFING IN CITY HALL
  • SLIDES AVAILABLE AT: WWW.SLIDESHARE.NET/MATTLEIGHNINGER GUIDES: PLANNING FOR STRONGER LOCAL DEMOCRACY – BIT.LY/PSLDNLC USING ONLINE TOOLS TO ENGAGE THE PUBLIC– BIT.LY/IWJGQN MAKING PUBLIC PARTICIPATION LEGAL – BIT.LY/1F2MGAP
  • RESOURCES www.icma.org www.participedia.net www.deliberative-democracy.net www.everydaydemocracy.org www.publicagenda.org www.kettering.org
  • QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS?