Opening government

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Creating value by opening communication and information

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  • … .But who had these tools?
  • “ ...not all technical innovations bring heretofore unimagined functionality… Some, and in my opinion the most valuable, take what 10% of the population had previously been able to do and make that capability available to 90% of the population. That’s what blogs and wikis have done. And this creates network effects"
  • Officially=organisations (generally)
  • Officially=organisations (generally)
  • 78% of New Zealanders use the Internet. Of these users, 27% have posted messages online, 34% have posted images online, and 10% keep a blog. Twenty eight percent participate in social networking sites at least on a weekly basis.
  • It’s not about the technology. It’s not about data quality. Or privacy. Or commercial sensitivity, or any of that stuff. That should all be dealt to as part of the everyday functioning of any administration. It is about accepting that we, the government, collect and manage this information on behalf of citizens and that it is our fundamental responsibility to make it available to them in a way that supports the creation of public and economic value
  • A…concept for the future is "inside out government". Government holds a wealth of information. Some of it - quite rightly - is sensitive and access should be strictly controlled - tax records for example. But in other areas, I see no reason why we can't turn government inside out, so to speak, and make the same data and information available to those outside of government. Government can tap wider resources in the community to analyse and use government data to help solve problems and produce insights. A ministerial committee is exploring this concept. Inside out government also requires government to be open to good ideas from business. We want to see ideas generated in the private sector and NGO sector genuinely considered and appraised - not simply ruled out on the basis that these sectors might not understand all aspects of government.
  • A…concept for the future is "inside out government". Government holds a wealth of information. Some of it - quite rightly - is sensitive and access should be strictly controlled - tax records for example. But in other areas, I see no reason why we can't turn government inside out, so to speak, and make the same data and information available to those outside of government. Government can tap wider resources in the community to analyse and use government data to help solve problems and produce insights. A ministerial committee is exploring this concept. Inside out government also requires government to be open to good ideas from business. We want to see ideas generated in the private sector and NGO sector genuinely considered and appraised - not simply ruled out on the basis that these sectors might not understand all aspects of government.
  • Opening government

    1. 1. Opening government Creating value by opening communication and information Matt Lane ALGIM 29 th Annual Conference 23 November 2009
    2. 2. Opening communication
    3. 3. What is social media? <ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Social bookmarking </li></ul><ul><li>Video sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Photo sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging </li></ul><ul><li>Mashups </li></ul>
    4. 4. What are media? <ul><li>“ Tools used to store and deliver information”: </li></ul><ul><li>One to one </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Voice, mail, telegrams, telephony, email </li></ul></ul><ul><li>One to many (broadcasting) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shouting, writing, books, newspapers, radio, film, television, websites </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Media bottlenecks Voice Writing Newspapers Books Film Television/radio Website Voice box Scribes (-1439) Printing press (1439-) Publisher (Binders, distributors, bankroll) Film studio (Directors, producers, editors, film) Channel (Frequency) Web administrator Broadcast media Bottleneck
    6. 6. <ul><ul><li>“ ...not all technical innovations bring heretofore unimagined functionality… Some, and in my opinion the most valuable, take what 10% of the population had previously been able to do and make that capability available to 90% of the population. That’s what blogs and wikis have done. And this creates network effects&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><li>- David Wiley </li></ul>The democratisation of media
    7. 7. Media bottlenecks? Voice Writing Newspapers Books Film Television/radio Website Voice box Scribes (-1439) Printing press (1439-) Publisher (Binders, distributors, bankroll) Film studio (Directors, producers, editors, film) Channel (Frequency) Web administrator Broadcast media Bottleneck
    8. 8. What is social media? <ul><li>The ability for anyone to hear anything, and say anything to everyone </li></ul><ul><li>And this is now business as usual </li></ul>
    9. 9. Who is using social media? <ul><li>1. “Officially” (Enterprise 2.0) : </li></ul><ul><li>Internally </li></ul><ul><li>Externally </li></ul>
    10. 11. Who is using social media? <ul><li>1. “Officially” (Enterprise 2.0) : </li></ul><ul><li>Internally </li></ul><ul><li>Externally </li></ul><ul><li>2. Individuals who up until recently could not broadcast to, and collaborate with, the world </li></ul>
    11. 13. Some examples relevant to New Zealand Public Sector (good, bad, and ugly)
    12. 15. “ CYFS Watch” blog <ul><li>Jan 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>“ Name and shame” </li></ul><ul><li>Breached privacy of staff </li></ul><ul><li>Threatened MP </li></ul><ul><li>In Dominion Post </li></ul><ul><li>Shut down by Google, later WordPress </li></ul>
    13. 18. http:// wikiscanner.virgil.gr /
    14. 19. Who’s editing Wikipedia? <ul><li>Ministry Of Social Development </li></ul><ul><li>Ministry Of Education </li></ul><ul><li>Ministry Of Agriculture </li></ul><ul><li>Ministry Of Fisheries </li></ul><ul><li>Ministry For The Environment </li></ul><ul><li>State Services Commission </li></ul><ul><li>The Treasury </li></ul>
    15. 20. On: <ul><li>Sledging (cricket), Steve Maharey, World Trade Center bombing, Scroggin, Karl Urban, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Metrosexual, MacGyver, New Zealand Office for the Community & Voluntary Sector </li></ul>
    16. 22. National Library Google model
    17. 24. “ MFATers” on Facebook
    18. 25. Jason Ryan on the NPSC’s blog
    19. 26. Published Guidance <ul><li>Principles for interaction with social media ( http:// tr.im/jmtG ) </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing social media monitoring ( http:// tr.im/jmtZ ) </li></ul>
    20. 27. Opening information
    21. 28. On openness Make [information] available to [the public] in a way that supports the creation of public and economic value ( http://tr.im/FvZU )
    22. 29. On openness Inside-out government ( www.tr.im/BO1Q )
    23. 30. Draft NZ Government Open Access and Licensing framework (NZGOAL) <ul><li>Recommended approach to opening up non-personal govt info and data for re-use </li></ul><ul><li>Covers non-copyright info and data + copyright works </li></ul><ul><li>Scope = State Services agencies </li></ul>www.tr.im/xdVm [email_address]
    24. 31. A video? <ul><ul><li>http:// creativecommons.org /videos/a-shared-culture </li></ul></ul>
    25. 32. Crown Copyright © When you see this … look for this
    26. 33. and Licensing
    27. 34. What data and information? <ul><li>Not: </li></ul><ul><li>Personal information </li></ul><ul><li>Commercially sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Security implications </li></ul><ul><li>Culturally sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Other reasons, e.g. incomplete data and information that may be materially misleading </li></ul>
    28. 35. What data and information? <ul><li>Wide variety of data/information like: </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative </li></ul><ul><li>Statistical </li></ul><ul><li>Geospatial, maps </li></ul><ul><li>Meteorological </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Databases, real-time data </li></ul><ul><li>Photos, videos </li></ul>
    29. 36. Examples
    30. 37. Examples
    31. 38. Examples
    32. 39. Examples
    33. 40. Examples
    34. 41. Examples
    35. 42. Set your data and information free
    36. 43. How do we make 1+1=3? <ul><li>The ability for anyone to say anything to everyone </li></ul><ul><li>+ </li></ul><ul><li>Government content openly licensed </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>Unforeseen creative, social and economic benefits for New Zealand, </li></ul><ul><li>and in turn, </li></ul><ul><li>greater transparency of government agencies’ performance benefits to the country </li></ul>
    37. 44. Opening government Opening communication and information Matt Lane ALGIM 29 th Annual Conference 23 November 2009
    38. 45. <ul><li>Presentation contains large amount taken from Vikram Kumar’s “Open Data, Open Government” http://www.e.govt.nz/policy/information-data/openpresentation </li></ul><ul><li>All images in this presentation are either under fair use provisions or based on Creative Commons licenses. </li></ul><ul><li>Attribution: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Slide 42: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gettysgirl/3537413538/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video by Jesse Dylan at http:// creativecommons.org /videos/a-shared-culture </li></ul></ul>This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. In essence, you are free to copy, distribute and adapt the work, as long as you attribute the work to the State Services Commission and abide by the other licence terms. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/nz/ . Please note that neither the State Services Commission emblem nor the New Zealand Government logo may be used in any way which infringes any provision of the Flags, Emblems, and Names Protection Act 1981 .

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