BA (Hons) Creative Sound And Music
                        2009/10




 ENCLOSED ARE THE HANDBOOKS FOR THE
        FOLLOWI...
Welcome to the Creative Sound and Music programme at the University
of Wales, Newport and well done for getting a place he...
Staff Contacts
Academic
Matthew Lovett

Programme Leader and Senior Lecturer in Composition,
Performance, Improvisation an...
Summary of Deadlines:
                         Semester One
Creative Music Practice Part One                9th November

...
Studio Rules
All students are expected to observe the rules when using the sound studios and
equipment:

   •   No food or...
Communication
mLE

You can download selected course documents, such as timetables and booking
forms from the My Learning E...
Presentations
For a number of your modules, you will be expected to formally present and
discuss your work. You will be as...
demonstrate a strong critical awareness and conceptual understanding of
the medium.

C10/C9/C8
A 2.2 at degree level is wo...
B11-B13 (Upper Second Class Degree Level)
Very good work which demonstrates a clear understanding of conceptual issues
and...
Referral and Retrieval
A minimum grade of E4 in each element of assessment and an overall grade of
D5 will be required to ...
Unfair Practice
“Unfair practice” refers to all breaches of assessment regulations that might give
an unfair advantage to ...
Personal Development Planning (PDP)
Personal Development Planning is seen as a valuable process that is structured and
sup...
Year 2
Level 5
Meeting       When            Purpose
Progress      1st personal    To renew contact after summer vacation,...
How to find us:              Caerleon Campus - E20 Rathmell Building


                        STUDY ADVICE SERVICE
What i...
This document can be made available in alternative formats, such as Braille or audio.
Contact Karen Jones in the Universit...
Creative Music Practice Part One




                                   16
Module Title:          Creative Music Practice Part One

Module Code:           G106943

Level                  4

Semeste...
Creative Music Practice Part One, in conjunction with Musicology of the 20th
Century, will serve as an introduction to a p...
The following pages are taken from the definitive programme document. Please
pay special attention to all criteria and req...
Learning Outcomes explained:

       -   A measure of personal expression, imagination and creativity in practical
       ...
Will normally include the following:

    •   seminars or other forms of small-group discussion, sometimes involving
     ...
Performance (Summative)

Students will be required to stage a musical performance that demonstrates group
interaction and ...
The work will be assessed according to the following criteria:

   1. Outcome: students will be expected to show evidence ...
-   What risks have you taken with your work – how have you pushed your own
       creative limits?

Technical Competence:...
-   Do you understand why you are doing what you are doing?
   -   Does your work show that you acknowledge and understand...
9      Reading

Essential

BAILEY, D. 1993. Improvisation: Its Nature and Practice in Music. Da Capo Press

COX, C (ed), W...
SHEPARD, M. 2002. Simple Flutes: A Guide to Flute Making and Playing, or How to
Make and Play Great Homemade Musical Instr...
Module Brief

Title:                         Creative Music Practice Part One

Contents:                      (A)    Exper...
work. Your written work is an opportunity for you to explain and evaluate your work and
provide evidence of your ability t...
the programme team BEFORE your assessment.




                                             30
Creative Music Practice Part Two




                                   31
Module Title:             CMP2: Creative Music Practice 2

Module Code:              G106944

Level                     4
...
Creative Music Practice Part Two follows on from and builds upon the knowledge and
skills that you will have gained during...
The following pages are taken from the definitive programme document. Please
pay special attention to all criteria and req...
9.   The ability to find creative links between the results of personal research, textual
     and musical analysis, schol...
4       Indicative Content

The module draws on Fluxus, Dada, conceptual art as well as site-specific and
interactive prac...
•   studio or laboratory work, including hands-on experience in the use of electronic
        equipment for composition an...
programme for studio practice and bookings and the responsible care of all equipment.

Formative Assessment

Formative ass...
Assessment Criteria Explained:

The following are an informal guide to assist you in assessing the quality of your work
wi...
-   Are you using the right crew – sound engineer, lighting, get-in and get-out?
   -   Is the equipment being looked afte...
-   Teamwork and developing the ability to work collaboratively is essential for any
       creative practice. It is there...
9      Reading

Essential

BERGHAUS, G. 2005 Avant-garde Performance:             Live Events and Electronic
Technologies....
TREIB, M. 1997. Space Calculated in Seconds: The Philips Pavilion, Le Corbusier,
Edgard Varese. Princeton University Press...
Module Brief

Title:                        Creative Music Practice Part Two

Contents:                     Live sonic eve...
Outcome

                 -   Does my work show that I’m developing musically and that I’m
                     aware of w...
Musicology of the 20th Century




                                 46
Module Title:       Musicology of the 20th Century

Module Code:              G106002

Level                     4

Semest...
The following intended as a guide to the Musicology of the 20th Century module, and
supplements the validated programme do...
The following pages are taken from the definitive programme document. Please
pay special attention to all criteria and req...
4. The ability to carry out independent learning as a basis for academic study,
      presentation of individual and group...
Practice sections of this handbook). Please be careful to thoroughly check your work in
this regard, take time to read thr...
Method

Introduction to the session - what do we understand to be music - what constitutes a
musical experience?

Example ...
5. Workshop sessions will address the acquisition of research, writing, communication
    and presentation skills and tech...
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules
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Semester 1 Handbook for Creative Music Modules

  1. 1. BA (Hons) Creative Sound And Music 2009/10 ENCLOSED ARE THE HANDBOOKS FOR THE FOLLOWING MODULES: YEAR ONE Semester One Creative Music Practice Part One G106943 Creative Music Practice Part One G106944 Musicology of the 20th Century G106002 1
  2. 2. Welcome to the Creative Sound and Music programme at the University of Wales, Newport and well done for getting a place here. Over the next three years you’re going to be exploring sound and music from a number of diverse and challenging perspectives. This document is intended as a guide to the programme of study you're about to start and includes your module handbooks as well as some important information you’ll need to support your studies. It also supplements the validated programme document. 2
  3. 3. Staff Contacts Academic Matthew Lovett Programme Leader and Senior Lecturer in Composition, Performance, Improvisation and Critical Musicology E: matthewlovett@newport.ac.uk T: 01633 432608 Tim Land Lecturer in Business and Production E: tim.land@newport.ac.uk T: 01633 432671 Nic Finch Lecturer in Music Media E: nic.finch@newport.ac.uk T 01633 430088 Technical Matt Jackson Senior technician E: matthew.jackson@newport.ac.uk T: 01633 432602 Aidan Taylor Jamie Thomas Student Technicians 3
  4. 4. Summary of Deadlines: Semester One Creative Music Practice Part One 9th November Creative Music Practice Part Two 18th December and 15th January Musicology of the 20th Century 11th and 12th January The modules carry 20 credits each at Level 4 How to hand in written submissions Unless otherwise stated, all written submissions to be made to SAMD Reception Desk, Caerleon Campus. You must retain your receipt. You will also be required to submit some module assignments electronically. Details of this will be provided during the lecture series. Your priorities and responsibilities • Read this handbook carefully and retain it for future reference. • Read project briefs carefully. • Attend all sessions and be on time. If you are unable to make a session - especially practical sessions and rehearsals - you must let your tutor know as soon as possible. The understanding of the material that you show in practical sessions can affect your grades. • Submit work on time. • Be an active member of the group and respect your colleagues. • If you do not understand something in this handbook, or have any questions or concerns at any point in the module, contact the lecturers as soon as you can in teaching sessions or by e-mail. 4
  5. 5. Studio Rules All students are expected to observe the rules when using the sound studios and equipment: • No food or drink to be consumed in the space • Leave the space tidy. Clear away equipment, furniture and chairs. Take your personal belongings with you • Studio cancellations must be made 24 hours in advance, failure to do so may result in a ban on studio / equipment use • Studios are only to be used by students enrolled at the University of Wales, Newport • Students are expected to follow health and safety instructions at all times and not to engage in any activity which could endanger themselves or others. If In doubt you must check with a tutor or the technician Studio and Stores Times CSM Technicians will be available at the following times Monday – Friday: Stores Returns 4.30 – 5pm Stores / Studio Bookings 5 – 6pm It is essential that you present your Student Skills Passport when making bookings. Late return of items or misuse of studios will result in bans being implemented. Stores booking forms and conditions of use Please photocopy the attached forms in order to make stores bookings. Students are advised to plan their use of equipment well in advance, in order to facilitate their own and each other’s ease of study. You will receive instruction in the use of the equipment in the studio and for any other equipment that you will be expected to use. You are expected to use this equipment with respect and due regard for safe working practices. You must ask for advice if required. All equipment should be turned off after use. Studio time Year One Semester One students have been not been allocated recording studio hours during the module, as their studies will not require multi-track facilities 5
  6. 6. Communication mLE You can download selected course documents, such as timetables and booking forms from the My Learning Essentials web area. You can also access the Library, Mail, Study Zone and information on Study Skills. www.my.newport.ac.uk SMS The Creative Sound and Music programme use an SMS information service. It’s been found to be the easiest and fastest way of informing you of any last minute changes or sending reminders – so please keep us up to date with any changes to your mobile telephone. Number. This can be done online via the mLE or at the student desk Email The academic board has agreed that emails sent to your University email account are a legitimate form of communication (that is equivalent to paper- based communication). You are advised to check your University email account on a regular basis. Project Folders For all modules, you are expected to keep a project / research folder. This is not a diary. It should contain the main learning points of sessions, your independent research, ideas, audio and visual sketches, photographs, designs, technical plans, rehearsal schedules and any other documentation that has contributed to the development and realization of the relevant project. For some modules, this folder will be in digital format Essays • Essays must be word-processed, double-spaced and should be checked for spelling and grammar. • The essay should address itself directly to the question set and show evidence that it has been planned with an introduction and a logical presentation of ideas leading to a conclusion. • All work must be your own and be properly referenced. 6
  7. 7. Presentations For a number of your modules, you will be expected to formally present and discuss your work. You will be assessed in a similar way to a piece of written work, in that the assessors will be looking for evidence of research, understanding, analysis, clarity of thought and the ability to communicate your Ideas and opinions. These presentations may be individual or group and they may take place with one or more internal assessors. Occasionally they may be lead or observed by the external examiner. Transparency in Group Assessment The nature and success of practical work requires collaborative working. Group work requires each team member to effectively participate in all the activities throughout the process. The grade for the group work will reflect the working processes and the overall success of the final outcome [performance, workshop or presentation]. When grading tutors will usually award a 'core' grade for the project applicable to all members of the group. However, they may also adjust the marks of individual members of the group equitably to reflect the individual's contribution. This will be supported by evidence gathered from individual research and project folders. When engaged in group work, all members of the group are expected to work as part of the production team, and this is reflected in the assessment process What your grades mean Practice-based Projects A16/A15/A14: A First at degree level is work of outstanding overall quality. It will consist of an original and ambitious project/performance, which has achieved its goals with a excellent of technical competence. It will be informed both by the strength of its original idea(s) and an appropriate and distinctive structure. It will have been well researched / planned and exhibit a highly developed critical awareness and conceptual understanding of the medium. B13/B12/B11: A 2.1 at degree level is work that achieves a very high overall standard. The work will have achieved its goals and will demonstrate a significant degree of imagination and ambition with a very good level of technical competence. It will be well structured. It will show significant evidence of research/planning and 7
  8. 8. demonstrate a strong critical awareness and conceptual understanding of the medium. C10/C9/C8 A 2.2 at degree level is work of a good overall standard showing understanding of conventions, although these may be limited. It will have achieved some of its primary goals. Technically it will be competent with a recognisable structure. It will be based on a degree of research/planning and exhibit some critical awareness and conceptual understanding of the medium. D7/D6/D5 A Third at degree level is work with some ability to communicate and an overall satisfactory – weak standard. It demonstrates some understanding of conventions and it is likely that its goals will have been achieved to only a limited extent. Technical competence will range from adequate to poor and it will lack a clear structure. It will show evidence of minimal research/planning and indicate some critical or conceptual understanding of the medium. E4/F3/F2/F1 A Fail at degree level is work of overall poor to very poor quality. Its technical standard, content and structure will be extremely weak. Its goals will be confused and/there will have been little attempt to achieve them. There will be no evidence of original research or understanding of the medium. Written Work A14-A16 (First Class degree level) Outstanding work that conveys not only mastery of the basic material and a grasp of conceptual issues, but also sustains a focus of investigation. It will show significant original and independent thought with a high level of analysis communicated with articulate and accurate expression. A wide range of primary and secondary texts will have been used with confidence. Work at the top end of this range will show a high degree of flair, scholarship and originality. Students will have shown a very detailed knowledge of the subject and presented an argument in a sophisticated way. There will be evidence of independent reading, and research that is organised with outstanding clarity and shows an ability to evaluate material critically. 8
  9. 9. B11-B13 (Upper Second Class Degree Level) Very good work which demonstrates a clear understanding of conceptual issues and of the basic material of the course and the ability to apply critical and analytical skills with a good degree of fluency and accuracy. Work at this level should present a well-structured, coherent argument showing an ability to synthesise ideas based on research and reading. Work at the upper end of this range may be showing some, but not all, of achievements at the higher levels. C8-C10 (Lower Second Class Degree Level) A good piece of work in which understanding of the basic material is demonstrated, together with some degree of awareness of critical issues and a certain amount of ability to deal with conceptual issues. The structure of the argument may be loose and although expression should be accurate, occasional stylistic or syntactical problems may occur. Work at this level may indicate an over-reliance on obvious secondary sources or lecture notes. Work at the upper end of this range may be showing some, but not all, of achievements at higher levels. D5-D7 (Third Class Degree) These grades signify work that is of a satisfactory standard. They will reflect difficulty in understanding the basic material or critical ideas of the course, but will be conceptually weak. There will be some confusion over issues raised by the assignment and will be based on obvious sources and lecture notes in an uncritical fashion with the use of possibly irrelevant primary and secondary material. Grammatical, syntactical and spelling errors are frequent in work achieving these grades. Work at the upper end of this range may be showing some, but not all, of achievements at a higher level. E4 (Marginal Fail) This is work that has marginally failed. There will be inadequate evidence of understanding, research and thought to merit a pass grade. It is likely to suffer from serious deficiencies in grammar and spelling. Work attaining this grade is only considered a pass if augmented by work of a higher grade in all other areas of the assessment. F1-F3 (Fail) This range is from work that is unsatisfactory at all levels to work that is overall of an unsatisfactory level. There may be serious misunderstanding of the issues, gross errors of fact and interpretation and only a minimal level of coherence in presenting an argument. There may be considerable errors of syntax and spelling. The student may not have attempted to apply the department’s conventions on presentation or followed these only sporadically and sloppily. At the higher end of this range there will be some knowledge shown but this will be flawed in the detail. The work will show only limited competency in written English. 9
  10. 10. Referral and Retrieval A minimum grade of E4 in each element of assessment and an overall grade of D5 will be required to pass the module. Failure of one element (F1/F2/F3) can be retrieved by a resubmission of appropriate work for that element only; this will result in an overall grade of D5 for the module. Referencing The following applies to all essays, presentations, evaluations and portfolio work: • Make sure that you include a bibliography of any sources used (see the library leaflet on HARVARD conventions for the layout of bibliographies and references) • Include references to the sources of all quotations, facts, statistics and matters of opinion which are not your own, at the point where they occur in the presentation. • The library leaflet explains how to make references. These sources should be listed at the end in the bibliography. This is very important, and should be followed carefully to avoid any possible suspicion that you are submitting work that is not entirely your own • Downloaded sections from internet sites, text cut and pasted from CD- ROMs, or extracts from printed books, should never be used in academic contexts without full and explicit referencing to the source. Avoid using the internet as the main source of your research Plagiarism Please note that correct referencing of source material that you use in assessments is not just good practice, but also is a protection against allegations of the unfair practice of plagiarism. Students are often expected to read widely in texts, journals or websites in preparation for assessments, but not to create a piece of work which is composed significantly of others’ words (even if referenced). Your own ability to think, reflect, analyse, and synthesise needs to be assessed, not just your ability to select sources. You will be credited for your research and use of sources. 10
  11. 11. Unfair Practice “Unfair practice” refers to all breaches of assessment regulations that might give an unfair advantage to a student in gaining a higher grade than his/her ability would merit, and includes: a) copying or using unauthorised materials or the work of another student; b) impersonating another student, or allowing yourself to be impersonated; c) submitting someone else’s work for assessment as though it were your own (plagiarism); d) claiming to have carried out research or obtained results which in fact you haven’t; e) presenting false information about special circumstances, intended to mislead. The action which will be taken in the case of suspected unfair practice is detailed in regulation 6 on the registry's website http://registry.newport.ac.uk, and, if a Committee of Inquiry finds it proven, may result in penalties ranging from a reprimand, to cancellation of marks, to disqualification from study. Retrieval Briefs In the event that you fail an assignment or fail to hand in an assignment you will be required to undertaken a RETRIEVAL assignment. The retrieval briefs for this module are indicated at the end of each of the module information that follows. Progression Students are required to attempt the assessment brief for each module, within each academic year. In order to progress into the following year of study, you must achieve at least a grade of F3 for each 20 credit module. Failure to do so may result in your repeating the year or the suspension of your studies 11
  12. 12. Personal Development Planning (PDP) Personal Development Planning is seen as a valuable process that is structured and supported by you to reflect upon your own learning, performance and / or achievement. It will also enable you to plan for your personal, educational and career development. The objective of the PDP is to help you to: • improve your capacity as individuals • understand what and how you are learning • review, plan and take responsibility for your own learning • become more effective, independent and confident self-directed learners • understand how you are learning and relate your learning to a wider context • improve your general skills for study and career management • articulate personal goals • evaluate progress towards your achievement • encourage a positive attitude to learning throughout your life. How will this all work? The PDP is integrated into the programme through meetings held with your personal tutor no less than 3 times every year in order to discuss overall progress, identify your support needs and recognise and record your achievements and strengths. The construction of a Progress File is combined with preparation of a portfolio/ that will be of real use to you as you move to a post-degree destination. The PDP paperwork belongs to you, but your tutors will keep appropriate records that can be made available to you on request. The intention of PDP is to support your learning and development and it is therefore fully integrated into programme as follows: Year 1 Level 4 Meeting When Purpose Diagnostic 1st personal To establish contact with your tutor, to introduce and Meeting tutorial explain the paperwork you will need to keep as a record Semester of your progress and reflection on your development and One establish your initial needs. Progress Assessment To discuss your progress to date. To reflect upon and Meeting 1 Feedback update your needs and to consider your overall progress Semester indicated by the assessment record. One Progress Assessment To discuss your progress to date, with particular Meeting 2 Feedback emphasis on your move into level five, to reflect upon and Semester update your record and needs and to consider your Two overall progress indicated by assessment records, with particular attention paid to your support needs. 12
  13. 13. Year 2 Level 5 Meeting When Purpose Progress 1st personal To renew contact after summer vacation, to reflect upon Meeting 3 tutorial and update the record of your needs and to consider your Semester overall progress indicated by assessment records One Progress Assessment To discuss your progress to date. To reflect upon and Meeting 4 Feedback update your needs and to consider your overall progress Semester indicated by the assessment record. One Progress Assessment To discuss your progress to date, with particular Meeting 5 Feedback emphasis on your move into level six, to reflect upon and Semester update your record and needs and to consider your Two overall progress indicated by assessment records, with particular attention paid to your support needs. Year 3 Level 6 Meeting When Purpose Progress 1st personal To renew contact after summer vacation, to reflect upon Meeting 6 tutorial and update the record of your needs and to consider your Semester overall progress indicated by assessment records One Progress Assessment To discuss your progress to date, with particular Meeting 7 Feedback emphasis on preparation for post-degree destination, to Semester reflect upon and update your record of needs, with One particular emphasis on support for presenting work in a professional context. Progress Assessment To discuss your progress to date, with particular Meeting 8 Feedback emphasis on the evident strengths of your achievements Semester that can inform the presentation of work to a potential Two employer or other post-degree destination STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Student Services offer services dealing with a range of issues such as health, financial difficulties, spiritual wellbeing, childcare and careers. Contact Numbers: 01633 432657 - Student Services on the Caerleon Campus 01633 432396 - Student Services on the Allt-yr-yn Campus Opening Hours: 8.30am-5pm - Monday to Thursday 8.30am-4.30pm - Friday 13
  14. 14. How to find us: Caerleon Campus - E20 Rathmell Building STUDY ADVICE SERVICE What is the Study Advice Service? Study Advice Tutors offer free advice to students on a range of study skills such as essay/report writing, Harvard referencing, critical thinking, reading strategies, note making, revision techniques, presentation skills, dissertations, punctuation skills and time management. The Study Advice Service is for anyone who wants to improve and develop their study skills. What help is offered? 45 minute tutorials are available for students to obtain advice on any study skill issue. Tutors can help with decoding an essay title, devising an essay plan, referencing sources, suggesting revision and exam techniques and many other study skill areas. Students can also book a tutor to watch a practise presentation where verbal and written feedback is provided. The Study Advice Service does not offer subject specific advice or proofread work. Does the Study Advice Service offer dyslexia support? No, but the tutors work very closely with Student Services who do offer support. Can the Study Advice Service help me with my English? The service does not offer a proofreading service but will instead help and support the student in being able to identify errors in his or her own work. For students whose first language is not English, proofreading support and English classes are offered elsewhere in the University. For individual or group tutorials at Caerleon campus or Allt-yr-yn campus, Email: study.advice@newport.ac.uk Telephone 01633 432657 Framework for Amicable Issues Resolution It is the policy of the University of Wales, Newport (Newport) that students should have access to a framework through which to raise issues in sufficient time to obtain useful remedy and keep their studies on track. This framework draws upon the provisions that University of Wales, Newport (Newport) makes for student representation (via the Students Union) and for handling complaints. It is intended that all those who use this framework should maintain a focus on finding the most appropriate and feasible solution that helps to ensure that the student experience at Newport is fit for purpose. 14
  15. 15. This document can be made available in alternative formats, such as Braille or audio. Contact Karen Jones in the University Secretary's Office: 01633 432083 15
  16. 16. Creative Music Practice Part One 16
  17. 17. Module Title: Creative Music Practice Part One Module Code: G106943 Level 4 Semester 1 Credits: 20 Module Leader: Matthew Lovett Duration (Hours): Supported Hours: 50 Directed Studies: 50 Independent Studies: 100 Assignment: Improvised / experimental musical performance and project portfolio Submission Date: 9th November (Performance, Audio CD and Project Folder Presentations) Place of Submission: Sound Studios 17
  18. 18. Creative Music Practice Part One, in conjunction with Musicology of the 20th Century, will serve as an introduction to a particular way of working with, and thinking about sound and music. The main purpose of the module is to address many of the issues associated with contemporary music making, with particular emphasis on experimentation, improvisation and innovation. The module has been structured in such a way as to give you an understanding of sound and music ‘from the ground up’. You’ll start by finding and making instruments out of scrap, then design and build your own in the fabrication workshops. You’ll then move into the electronics lab to modify and build more instruments, before learning about digital sound processing and midi interfaces. This will be combined with practical sessions on improvisation, MAX/MSP experimental/electroacoustic music and performance. You will also be introduced to the basic functionality of Pro Tools and live recording techniques. You’ll be expected to supplement your studies by keeping a project folder, as well as undertaking self-directed listening, reading and musical creativity, which will be supported by regular group critique and tutorial sessions. This module accounts for 20 credits and it is important to understand that you need to pass this module in order to proceed to the next. All the information given here is to help you cope with the demands of the module and get the most out of it. This module will be assessed on a number of elements that will combine to make up a coherent body of work: • A 10 – 15 minute live performance of experimental / improvised music And a portfolio of projects that includes: • A self-built instrument • Electronic and digital tools and instruments • A live recording of the performance • A project folder that contains your research, project descriptions, audio-visual- written ideas and notes, technical plans for performance, rehearsal schedules and any other relevant material You’ll develop this body of work over the course of the module, so it’s important that you manage your workload and don’t let it get out of control. This module accounts for 20 credits and it is important to understand that you must submit work for this module in order to proceed to the next year of your studies. All the information given here is to help you cope with the demands of the module and get the most out of it. It’s worth remembering that Creative Music Practice Part One is a challenging experience for all students – the best thing to do is dive in head first! 18
  19. 19. The following pages are taken from the definitive programme document. Please pay special attention to all criteria and requirements. If you need to clarify anything at all please do not hesitate to ask for help from your tutor. 1 Rationale The central focus of this module is on experimentation, improvisation and developing creative methodologies. The module is intended to act as a foundation for students to widen their perspectives on music practice. The module will develop a musical understanding beyond the conventional and popular forms focussing on improvisation and musicianship, as well as developing strategies for the design and use of new creative tools. The module will also introduce theoretical and critical concepts key to process, innovation, and experimentation. Students will also be made aware of development and documentation processes, in order to critically evaluate their work. The module will be delivered through practical workshops supported by seminar discussions designed to develop musical creativity and new methods of ideation. The module will conclude with a performance of improvised and experimental music that features the students’ self-built instruments. 2 Aims The module aims to: • introduce students to improvisational techniques • develop creative skills, techniques and musicianship within a group context • develop listening skills and music appreciation • introduce and examine the developments of musical forms and texts in the modern period • stimulate thought, discussions and debate which encourages further reading, listening and research 3 Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate the following: 1. A measure of personal expression, imagination and creativity in practical music- making (improvisation and performance) and the ability to communicate through music employing appropriate technical and interpretative means at an introductory level. 2. The ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities, and to show skills in teamwork, negotiation, organisation and decision-making. 3. Knowledge of less familiar areas of music and the ability to refer to, evaluate and then apply to practice. 4. Understand the design and construction of a range of musical instruments and tools. 19
  20. 20. Learning Outcomes explained: - A measure of personal expression, imagination and creativity in practical music making (improvisation and performance) and the ability to communicate through music employing appropriate technical and interpretative means In performance, although you will not be specifically assessed on your instrumental or technical skills, you will need to show that you can perform well and that your music has been thought through. - The ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities, and to show skills in teamwork, negotiation, organisation and decision- making During this project, you’ll be learning to work effectively with others, not only during performance, but also in planning, rehearsing and organising all of the technical and other resources that you need in order to complete the work - A knowledge of less familiar areas of music and the ability to refer to, evaluate and then apply to individual practice when developing and constructing work Your work will also need to demonstrate that you’re able to communicate your ideas through music and that you’ve taken on board the listening and reading content of the module. - Understand the design and construction of a range of musical instruments and tools You’ll be exploring a number of different approaches to instrument design and construction, and it’s essential that you document your learning process with written, audio and visual evidence 4 Indicative Content Through a series of practical workshops that will introduce them to experimental / ideational processes as well as design and construction methodologies, students will develop a number of mechanical, electronic and digital musical / sonic tools. In parallel to this, a series of workshops that draws on avant-garde and experimental music traditions, will introduce improvisation techniques. In contrast to passive hearing, students will be encouraged to develop their musical awareness by actively listening and responding in small ensembles. Students will also be inducted in the use of live sound systems, and given training in the use of recording equipment and software in order to document live performance. 5 Learning and Teaching Strategy 20
  21. 21. Will normally include the following: • seminars or other forms of small-group discussion, sometimes involving individual or group student presentations to develop oral presentation, negotiation and communication skills • other forms of small-group teaching and learning in which students have the opportunity to work together as a team (for example, a joint technology or performance project) • one-to-one interaction, particularly supporting the development of self-direction, intellectual independence and research skills through dissertations, analysis and individual projects, and the development of creative skills through composition and performance • lectures that stimulate thought, discussion and debate, and which encourage further reading, listening and research by which students can extend their own knowledge and understanding • workshops and masterclasses, normally addressing the acquisition of creative skills and techniques within a group context, and often benefiting from the experience of visiting specialists • peer learning where students discuss critically their colleagues' work, usually performances or compositions • writing (essays, learning journals, concert reviewing etc) as a means of developing research techniques, acquiring knowledge, and presenting ideas and arguments in written form • practical exercises, usually connected with the development of creative, analytical and aural skills • independent learning, whether as directed reading and listening related to essay- writing or dissertation/project work or as practice for developing creative skills • use of computer-assisted learning, of email for discussion groups or tutorial supervision, and of other forms of ICT • a wide variety of non-assessed curricular activities, especially those involving the participation in or attendance at performances 6 Assessment Strategy Will normally include the following: • practical examinations in which students demonstrate their technical and interpretative skills in performance. The programme of music is normally agreed with tutors in advance. Students are expected to show an awareness of stylistic issues. Practical examinations may involve individuals or groups and may be held in public • creative projects, often assessed by a mixture of continuous assessment, documentation and final presentation/performance, and especially relevant for interdisciplinary work (for example music in combination with theatre, dance, video etc) • compositions - for group discussion and critique, thereby developing students' abilities to formulate criteria for judgement, and to express their thoughts verbally • self-assessment demonstrating students' abilities to evaluate their work objectively and to identify their own strengths and weaknesses 7 Assessment Requirements 21
  22. 22. Performance (Summative) Students will be required to stage a musical performance that demonstrates group interaction and individual contribution and takes into account the issues raised in the module such as improvisation, electronic music and other experimental musical practices. This will form 50% of the final module grade. (Learning Outcomes 1 - 4). Presentation / Portfolio of Works (Summative) Students will be required to make a presentation that discusses the assessed work and submit a portfolio of projects that have been constructed during the module. The work should reflect a variety of media, and demonstrate the application of research and commitment to the design and build process. The portfolio will also include a documentary audio recording of the performed work. This will form 50% of the final module grade. (Learning Outcomes 1 - 4). Workshop / Creative Practice (Formative) Students will be required to attend all scheduled workshops, rehearsals and critiques for the module. Students are also required to uphold the terms and conditions set out by the programme for studio practice and bookings and the responsible care of all equipment. Formative Assessment Formative assessment is an interim 'work in progress' diagnosis carried out during the assignment period, providing the student with the opportunity for feedback from the Programme staff. The purpose of this input is to give the student advice on "where you are at" with the project and how to improve the quality of learning. Formative assessment maybe carried out through group or individual tutorials and critiques. Summative Assessment Summative assessment is more comprehensive in nature and is used to check the level of the student’s learning at the end of an assignment (here the student will be assigned a final grade subject to Exam Board ratification, using the Assessment Criteria set out in the Module Handbook). The purpose of this is to ensure that the student has understood and met the programme goals and objectives and to monitor the level that has been achieved in meeting the learning outcomes set out in the module briefs. All assessment elements in the module must be attempted and the student must achieve a minimum of E4 in all elements, and an overall average of D5 in order to achieve credit. All assessed elements will be equally weighted in calculating the final grade. In the event of failure, students will be instructed to retrieve the element or elements of the course, which they have failed. Group projects will be given individual retrieval tasks in the event of failure. (Refer to regulations 21 and 22 for Module Initial Degrees) 8 Assessment Criteria All assessment criteria will be applied in accordance with the HEFCW generic descriptors for Level Four. 22
  23. 23. The work will be assessed according to the following criteria: 1. Outcome: students will be expected to show evidence of the exercise of creativity, inventiveness and aesthetic sensitivity in realising the brief. (Learning Outcomes 1 - 4) 2. Technical Competence: students will be expected to demonstrate a competence in the technical skills required for and relevant to their assessed work. (Learning Outcomes 1 & 4) 3. Critical Understanding: students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical issues and debates raised in both the practical and theoretical modules, make clear the range of theoretical positions in their work and provide evidence of depth of study. (Learning Outcomes 1, 3 & 4) 4. Production Process (Research and Organisation): students will be expected to demonstrate effective time and resource management; including the ability to gather, analyse, manipulate, or interrogate research materials, the ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities in a professional setting and to meet all deadlines. (Learning Outcomes 1 – 4) Each of the above criteria will form 25% of the final module grade. Assessment Criteria Explained: The following are an informal guide to assist you in assessing the quality of your work with reference to the above criteria. Outcome: students will be expected to show evidence of creativity, inventiveness and aesthetic sensitivity in realising the brief. Aesthetics - Is the piece well structured? - Do the melodies/themes/musical ideas/sounds work? - Is the musical structure appropriate to the piece? - Are you using the right instruments? - Are the instruments doing what’s right for the piece? - Is there any evidence of stagecraft, such as dress, performance skills, communication with the audience? Creativity and Inventiveness - Do you engage with the audience? - Is there evidence of this? - Are you using lighting? - Are you using any visual media? - Is there a stage plan? - Is the music innovative? - Does the performance show that you have used your imagination to bring all the elements together? - How ambitious is your work – what evidence is there of this? 23
  24. 24. - What risks have you taken with your work – how have you pushed your own creative limits? Technical Competence: students will be expected to demonstrate a competence in the technical skills required for and relevant to their assessed work. Production It may be useful for you to think of a performance that you consider to be professional both in terms of its artistic merit and the quality of its technical support. - Is the sound quality good? - Are the levels right and can you hear everything (including what the singer is singing)? - Have you made all the right connections in your set up? - Have you considered Health and safety – is there evidence of this? - Have you rigged the P.A. correctly? - Is there enough power? - Have you used the appropriate desk, speakers and monitoring for the venue? - Have you used the appropriate equipment for the job, such as a stage box instead of multiple XLR cables? - Have you used the right amplification and instruments – do they work? - Are you using the right crew – sound engineer, lighting, get-in and get-out? - Is the equipment being looked after and used properly? Aesthetics - Have you made sure there is no feedback? - Are there any buzzes or hums from faulty or unearthed equipment? - Does the lighting work and is it being used well? - Is the staging set up well? - Is the audience properly catered for? - Is the musicianship of a professional standard? Critical Understanding: students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical issues and debates raised in both the practical and theoretical modules, make clear the range of theoretical positions in their work and provide evidence of depth of study. Supporting Evidence - Are your ideas underpinned by your research – is there evidence of this? - Does your work make clear that you have engaged with a range of theoretical positions? - Does your work show that you have carried out focussed research on the issues relevant to your assessed work? - Is it clear that your ideas are supported by depth of study? - Are your theoretical positions implicit in the production and consumption of your work? Context 24
  25. 25. - Do you understand why you are doing what you are doing? - Does your work show that you acknowledge and understand your influences and notions of genre and aesthetics? Production Process (Research and Organisation): students will be expected to demonstrate effective time and resource management; including the ability to gather, analyse, manipulate, or interrogate research materials, the ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities in a professional setting and to meet all deadlines. Research - Have you demonstrated clearly that your work is informed by research? This can be gathered from a variety of sources, including books, magazines, journals, appropriate websites, audio and video resources. It’s vital that you reference your work correctly, making it easier for both you and your tutors to find your source material where necessary Organisation - Teamwork and developing the ability to work collaboratively is essential for any creative practice. It is therefore essential that you demonstrate your ability to work effectively with others - Time management is also a key ingredient to the success of any creative project – you must identify your targets and deadlines and show that you’ve met them Preparation - Is the performance well rehearsed? - Have you made the most of rehearsal/studio time? - Is the production and performance process run efficiently? - Does the performance start on time? - Have you planned the set up? - Have you given enough time for sound checking? - Are the production/performance tasks sensibly delegated? - Is the get-out successfully completed? - Has each group member fully participated in the production and performance process? Professionalism - Is there evidence of group work in the music and performance? - Is there evidence of teamwork in the production process? - Do the performers communicate well with each other? Your assessment will normally include reference to the items above. 25
  26. 26. 9 Reading Essential BAILEY, D. 1993. Improvisation: Its Nature and Practice in Music. Da Capo Press COX, C (ed), WARNER, D (ed). 2004. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music Continuum. International Publishing Group HOPKIN, B. 1996. Musical Instrument Design: Practical Information for Instrument Making. See Sharp Press NYMAN, M. 1999. Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond. Cambridge University Press Indicative BEBBINGTON, R. 1993. Electronic Music Learning Projects. Bernard Babani BERENDT, J. 1987. Nada Brahma - The World is Sound: Music and the Landscape of Consciousness. Inner Traditions Bear and Company BERLE, A. 1998. Improvisation for the Contemporary Musician. Amsco Music BORGO, D. 2006. Sync or Swarm: Improvising Music in a Complex Age. Continuum BOULEZ P, CAGE J, SAMUELS R (Ed), NATTIEZ J (Ed). 1995. The Boulez-Cage Correspondence. Cambridge University Press CAGE, J. 1973. Silence: Lectures and Writings. Wesleyan U.P. COLLINS, N. 2006 Handmade Electronic Music: The Art of Hardware Hacking. Routledge COPE, D. 1992. New Directions in Music. William C. Brown COWELL, H. 1996. New Musical Resources. Cambridge University Press DAVIES, H. 2002. Sounds Heard. Sound World Publishers GHAZALA, R. 2005. Circuit-Bending : Build Your Own Alien Instruments. Wiley Publishing HOLMES T. 2003. Electronic and Experimental Music. Routledge HOPKIN, B. 1995 Making Simple Musical Instruments: A Melodious Collection of String, Winds, Drums and More. Lark Books OLIVEROS, P. 2005. Deep Listening: A Composer’s Sound Practice. iUniverse SAWYER, D. 1977. Vibrations: Making Unorthodox Musical Instruments. Cambridge University Press 26
  27. 27. SHEPARD, M. 2002. Simple Flutes: A Guide to Flute Making and Playing, or How to Make and Play Great Homemade Musical Instruments for Children and All Ages from Bamboo, Wood, Clay, Metal, PVC Plastic, or Anything Else. Shepard Publications STEWART, D. 2000. Inside the Music: The Musician's Guide to Composition, Improvisation and the Mechanics of Music. Backbeat UK TOOP, D. 2001. Ocean of Sound: Aether Talk, Ambient Sound and Imaginary Worlds. Serpent’s Tail YOUNG, R (ed). 2002 Undercurrents, The Hidden Wiring of Modern Music. Continuum Online Resources http://junkdojo.com/ http://nadishana.com/ http://www.oddmusic.com/ http://harrypartch.com/ http://windworld.com/ 10 Professional Status N/A 11 Student Feedback Student feedback will be elicited through the following: 1. Personal tutorials. 2. Critiques and seminar based discussions. 3. Student representative reports at Subject Boards. 4. A standard module feedback questionnaire will be used across the School of Art, Media and Design at the end of every module. Feedback will be analysed and a summary for each module will be kept with each relevant programme AME file of evidence in the School office. 27
  28. 28. Module Brief Title: Creative Music Practice Part One Contents: (A) Experimental and improvised musical performance (B) Portfolio of works including: self-built instrument, electronic and digital tools, live recording Length: 10 – 15 minutes Submission: Sound Studios Dates: 9th November for Performance and Portfolio Presentations Weighting: Part (A) 50%, Part (B) 50% Retrieval: Portfolio of instruments and tools & Audio CD containing 10 minute live performance Brief: Part (A) – Live Performance (50%) This module has been concerned with innovation and creativity, and in groups you are required to stage a public musical performance of between 10 and 15 minutes that showcases your ability to work with improvised, experimental and electronic musical material as part of a small ensemble, demonstrating both your solo and interactive abilities. The emphasis is very much on a spontaneous musical performance that is implicitly informed by the module content, although your work may also take into account predetermined strategies and composition; please take the opportunity to discuss your ideas with your tutor. You will be assessed on your ability to perform and present your work and show your understanding of the requirements of live performance. This assessment will take into consideration the technical training provided during CSM1 and you will therefore be expected not simply to perform well and show due recognition to the role of the audience, but to engage with and manage all technical aspects of the production and documentation process. Part (B) – Project Portfolio (50%) You are also required to submit a Project Portfolio which contains your self-built musical instruments and tools, as well as your research notes, designs, descriptions of your project work, audio / visual or written ideas, technical plans for live performance, rehearsal schedules, and an Audio CD containing a live recording of your performed 28
  29. 29. work. Your written work is an opportunity for you to explain and evaluate your work and provide evidence of your ability to manage your professional practice. In realising this brief, you should consider the assessment criteria below and make sure that you are able to answer the following questions: Outcome - Does my work show that I’m developing musically and that I’m aware of what sounds good? - Have I taken on board everything from this module and really tried to make an interesting and engaging piece of music? - Do I know how to communicate well with the other musicians and with the audience? - Am I going to be able to showcase my solo as well as my ensemble musical abilities? Technical - Am I making live and recorded music that sounds professional? - How best can I present this music live? - What equipment or personnel do I need to put together a live performance? - Do I know how to get a good sound on stage and make sure that the audience can hear what’s going on? - Do I know how to set up, place and operate the microphones and other recording equipment in order to make a clear recording of my work? Critical Understanding - Does my work show that I have been listening to and engaging with the issues and music discussed in CSM1? - Does my work show that I understand and can perform music that is informed by a range of experimental and modernist ideas? Production Process (Research and Organisation) - Have I worked well with others in order to put this piece of music together? - How have I made the best use of my time during the production process? - Do I know how to describe the production/preparation process as well as the ideas behind my work? - Do I know how to evaluate my work and show that I have learned from the production and performance process? - Have I researched the project thoroughly, by using written, audio, visual materials? - Have I referenced my research and demonstrated clearly that my work is informed by a pro-active use of resources? If you are unsure about ANY of these points, don’t hesitate to ask for clarification with 29
  30. 30. the programme team BEFORE your assessment. 30
  31. 31. Creative Music Practice Part Two 31
  32. 32. Module Title: CMP2: Creative Music Practice 2 Module Code: G106944 Level 4 Semester 1 Credits: 20 Module Leader: Matthew Lovett Duration (Hours): Supported Hours: 50 Directed Studies: 50 Independent Studies: 100 Assignment: Submission Dates: Live sonic event 18th December Project Folder before 2pm, 12th January, Presentations 15th January Place of Submission: Performing Arts Space and Newport School of AMD reception, Caerleon Campus 32
  33. 33. Creative Music Practice Part Two follows on from and builds upon the knowledge and skills that you will have gained during CMP Part One. Having developed a number of musical instruments and tools and begun to broaden your understanding of experimental approaches to music making, you will now focus on working with real time outcomes to your work that make use of a new range of tools and strategies. You’re going to be working in groups to develop a live performance / sonic happening that showcases your understanding of working within a network of musicians, using a number of new tools and creative strategies, such as site-specific, interactive, electroacoustic and graphic scoring. You’ll continue with your induction into MAX / MSP, build a USB software controller, learn about using sensors and circuit boards, continue to develop your understanding of Pro Tools all within the context of collaboration and experimentation. The module will be assessed summatively at the live event and at your group presentation, where you will present and discuss your ideas, research, objectives and influences for the project. You’ll develop this body of work over the course of the module, so it’s important that you manage your workload and don’t let it get out of control. This module accounts for 20 credits and it is important to understand that you must submit work for this module in order to proceed to the next year of your studies. All the information given here is to help you cope with the demands of the module and get the most out of it. Good luck and remember to enjoy the process 33
  34. 34. The following pages are taken from the definitive programme document. Please pay special attention to all criteria and requirements. If you need to clarify anything at all please do not hesitate to ask for help from your tutor. 1 Rationale Following on from CMP1, the focus of CMP2 is once again directed towards innovation and experimentation. The module is designed to allow students to generate performance outcomes beyond the confines of conventional concert practice. This module advances students’ understanding of the use of sound and video within a network context and will continue to establish a theoretical foundation for students’ creative practice. Students will be introduced to audio and video software applications and will develop strategies for time-based and site specific work, with particular emphasis on the avant- garde. The module will be delivered through practical workshops supported by seminar discussions designed to develop creativity and new methods of ideation. The module will conclude with a live / time-based event. 2 Aims The module aims to: • develop the ability to reflect constructively on their own practice, for example, through considering different performing traditions and performer roles • develop presentational skills, such as awareness and acknowledgement of an audience • develop ensemble skills: performing effectively as part of a group • facilitate the creation of musical ideas and concepts that relate to, or combine with, other art forms and media • stimulate thought, discussions and debate which encourages further reading, listening and research 3 Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate the following: 5. Demonstrate the particular musical skills of ensemble performance, including improvisation and co-creation. 6. The ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities, and to show skills in teamwork, negotiation, organisation and decision-making. 7. An understanding of the means by which to integrate electronic and computer- based elements into live performance 8. An awareness of the implications of the multidisciplinary nature of music for creation, innovation and research. 34
  35. 35. 9. The ability to find creative links between the results of personal research, textual and musical analysis, scholarship, reflection and listening skills, and the process of performing 35
  36. 36. 4 Indicative Content The module draws on Fluxus, Dada, conceptual art as well as site-specific and interactive practice to establish a critical framework within which to develop live performance strategies. Through a series of workshops and seminars, students will develop an understanding of the use of audio and visual media within the context of time-based performance. Students will explore the use of networks, communities and systems in order to produce a realtime event. Students will also be introduced to examples of notating musical ideas from a diverse range of methods such as graphic, text and natural scores. A series of workshops will provide training in the use of audio and visual software to further extend students’ use of a range of media materials within their work. 5 Learning and Teaching Strategy Will normally include the following: • seminars or other forms of small-group discussion, sometimes involving individual or group student presentations to develop oral presentation, negotiation and communication skills • other forms of small-group teaching and learning in which students have the opportunity to work together as a team (for example, a joint technology or performance project) • one-to-one interaction, particularly supporting the development of self-direction, intellectual independence and research skills through dissertations, analysis and individual projects, and the development of creative skills through composition and performance • lectures that stimulate thought, discussion and debate, and which encourage further reading, listening and research by which students can extend their own knowledge and understanding • individual or small-group performance instruction, developing experience of repertoire, techniques of performance, musicianship, interpretation and presentation • workshops and masterclasses, normally addressing the acquisition of creative skills and techniques within a group context, and often benefiting from the experience of visiting specialists • peer learning where students discuss critically their colleagues' work, usually performances or compositions • writing (essays, learning journals, concert reviewing etc) as a means of developing research techniques, acquiring knowledge, and presenting ideas and arguments in written form • practical exercises, usually connected with the development of creative, analytical and aural skills • independent learning, whether as directed reading and listening related to essay- writing or dissertation/project work or as practice for developing creative skills 36
  37. 37. • studio or laboratory work, including hands-on experience in the use of electronic equipment for composition and/or recording, and for various forms of empirical work • use of computer-assisted learning, of email for discussion groups or tutorial supervision, and of other forms of ICT • fieldwork projects, where students study a musical culture in situ, by such methods as attending, observing and participating in events, and interviewing performers, patrons or listeners • a wide variety of non-assessed curricular activities, especially those involving the participation in or attendance at performances. 6 Assessment Strategy Will normally include the following: • practical examinations in which students demonstrate their technical and interpretative skills in performance. The programme of music is normally agreed with tutors in advance. Students are expected to show an awareness of stylistic issues. Practical examinations may involve individuals or groups and may be held in public • creative projects, often assessed by a mixture of continuous assessment, documentation and final presentation/performance, and especially relevant for interdisciplinary work (for example music in combination with theatre, dance, video etc) • compositions - for group discussion and critique, thereby developing students' abilities to formulate criteria for judgement, and to express their thoughts verbally • self-assessment demonstrating students' abilities to evaluate their work objectively and to identify their own strengths and weaknesses 7 Assessment Requirements Performance (Summative) Students will be required to stage a live event / happening that demonstrates an understanding of the critical and practical learning undertaken within the module. The specific nature and form of the event will be negotiated with the module leader during the module, but will make use of live performance as well as audio and visual media. This will form 75% of the final module grade. (Assessment Criteria 1 – 3) Presentation / Portfolio of Works (Summative) Students will be required to make a presentation that discusses the assessed work and submit a portfolio of projects that have been developed during the module. The work should reflect a variety of media, and demonstrate the application of research and commitment to the design and build process. This will form 25% of the final module grade. (Assessment Criteria 4) Workshop / Creative Practice (Formative) Students will be required to attend all scheduled workshops, rehearsals and critiques for the module. Students are also required to uphold the terms and conditions set out by the 37
  38. 38. programme for studio practice and bookings and the responsible care of all equipment. Formative Assessment Formative assessment is an interim 'work in progress' diagnosis carried out during the assignment period, providing the student with the opportunity for feedback from the Programme staff. The purpose of this input is to give the student advice on "where you are at" with the project and how to improve the quality of learning. Formative assessment maybe carried out through group or individual tutorials and critiques. Summative Assessment Summative assessment is more comprehensive in nature and is used to check the level of the student’s learning at the end of an assignment (here the student will be assigned a final grade subject to Exam Board ratification, using the Assessment Criteria set out in the Module Handbook). The purpose of this is to ensure that the student has understood and met the programme goals and objectives and to monitor the level that has been achieved in meeting the learning outcomes set out in the module briefs. All assessment elements in the module must be attempted and the student must achieve a minimum of E4 in all elements, and an overall average of D5 in order to achieve credit. All assessed elements will be equally weighted in calculating the final grade. In the event of failure, students will be instructed to retrieve the element or elements of the course, which they have failed. Group projects will be given individual retrieval tasks in the event of failure. (Refer to regulations 21 and 22 for Module Initial Degrees) 8 Assessment Criteria All assessment criteria will be applied in accordance with the HEFCW generic descriptors for Level Four. The work will be assessed according to the following criteria: 5. Outcome: students will be expected to show evidence of the exercise of creativity, inventiveness and aesthetic sensitivity in realising the brief. (Learning Outcomes 1 - 4) 6. Technical Competence: students will be expected to demonstrate a competence in the technical skills required for and relevant to their assessed work. (Learning Outcomes 1 & 4) 7. Critical Understanding: students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical issues and debates raised in both the practical and theoretical modules, make clear the range of theoretical positions in their work and provide evidence of depth of study. (Learning Outcomes 1, 3 & 4) 8. Production Process (Research and Organisation): students will be expected to demonstrate effective time and resource management; including the ability to gather, analyse, manipulate, or interrogate research materials, the ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities in a professional setting and to meet all deadlines. (Learning Outcomes 1 – 4) Each of the above criteria will form 25% of the final module grade. 38
  39. 39. Assessment Criteria Explained: The following are an informal guide to assist you in assessing the quality of your work with reference to the above criteria. Outcome: students will be expected to show evidence of creativity, inventiveness and aesthetic sensitivity in realising the brief. Aesthetics - Is the piece well structured? - Do the melodies/themes/musical ideas/sounds work? - Is the musical structure appropriate to the piece? - Are you using the right instruments? - Are the instruments doing what’s right for the piece? - Is there any evidence of stagecraft, such as dress, performance skills, communication with the audience? Creativity and Inventiveness - Do you engage with the audience? - Is there evidence of this? - Are you using lighting? - Are you using any visual media? - Is there a stage plan? - Is the music innovative? - Does the performance show that you have used your imagination to bring all the elements together? - How ambitious is your work – what evidence is there of this? - What risks have you taken with your work – how have you pushed your own creative limits? Technical Competence: students will be expected to demonstrate a competence in the technical skills required for and relevant to their assessed work. Production It may be useful for you to think of a performance that you consider to be professional both in terms of its artistic merit and the quality of its technical support. - Is the sound quality good? - Are the levels right and can you hear everything (including what the singer is singing)? - Have you made all the right connections in your set up? - Have you considered Health and safety – is there evidence of this? - Have you rigged the P.A. correctly? - Is there enough power? - Have you used the appropriate desk, speakers and monitoring for the venue? - Have you used the appropriate equipment for the job, such as a stage box instead of multiple XLR cables? - Have you used the right amplification and instruments – do they work? 39
  40. 40. - Are you using the right crew – sound engineer, lighting, get-in and get-out? - Is the equipment being looked after and used properly? Aesthetics - Have you made sure there is no feedback? - Are there any buzzes or hums from faulty or unearthed equipment? - Does the lighting work and is it being used well? - Is the staging set up well? - Is the audience properly catered for? - Is the musicianship of a professional standard? Critical Understanding: students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical issues and debates raised in both the practical and theoretical modules, make clear the range of theoretical positions in their work and provide evidence of depth of study. Supporting Evidence - Are your ideas underpinned by your research – is there evidence of this? - Does your work make clear that you have engaged with a range of theoretical positions? - Does your work show that you have carried out focussed research on the issues relevant to your assessed work? - Is it clear that your ideas are supported by depth of study? - Are your theoretical positions implicit in the production and consumption of your work? Context - Do you understand why you are doing what you are doing? - Does your work show that you acknowledge and understand your influences and notions of genre and aesthetics? Production Process (Research and Organisation): students will be expected to demonstrate effective time and resource management; including the ability to gather, analyse, manipulate, or interrogate research materials, the ability to work in combination with others on joint projects or activities in a professional setting and to meet all deadlines. Research - Have you demonstrated clearly that your work is informed by research? This can be gathered from a variety of sources, including books, magazines, journals, appropriate websites, audio and video resources. It’s vital that you reference your work correctly, making it easier for both you and your tutors to find your source material where necessary Organisation 40
  41. 41. - Teamwork and developing the ability to work collaboratively is essential for any creative practice. It is therefore essential that you demonstrate your ability to work effectively with others - Time management is also a key ingredient to the success of any creative project – you must identify your targets and deadlines and show that you’ve met them Preparation - Is the performance well rehearsed? - Have you made the most of rehearsal/studio time? - Is the production and performance process run efficiently? - Does the performance start on time? - Have you planned the set up? - Have you given enough time for sound checking? - Are the production/performance tasks sensibly delegated? - Is the get-out successfully completed? - Has each group member fully participated in the production and performance process? Professionalism - Is there evidence of group work in the music and performance? - Is there evidence of teamwork in the production process? - Do the performers communicate well with each other? Your assessment will normally include reference to the items above. 41
  42. 42. 9 Reading Essential BERGHAUS, G. 2005 Avant-garde Performance: Live Events and Electronic Technologies. Palgrave Macmillan COX, C (ed), WARNER, D (ed) Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music Continuum. International Publishing Group GIBBS, T. 2007. The Fundamentals of Sonic Art & Sound Design. AVA Publishing NYMAN, M. 1999. Experimental Music: Cage and Beyond. Cambridge University Press Indicative CAGE, J. 1973. Silence: Lectures and Writings. Wesleyan U.P. CARDEW, C. 1972. Scratch Music. Latimer New Dimensions COPE, D. 1992. New Directions in Music. William C. Brown COWELL, H. 1996. New Musical Resources. Cambridge University Press DWYER, T. 1971. Composing with Tape Recorders: Musique Concrete for Beginners. Oxford University Press EMMERSON, S. (Ed,) 1986 The Language of Electroacoustic Music. Palgrave Macmillan HENDRICKS, G. 2003. Critical Mass: Happenings, Fluxus, Performance, Intermedia and Rutgers University, 1958-1972. Rutgers University Press HIGGINS, H. 2002, Fluxus Experience. University of California Press HOLMES T. 2003. Electronic and Experimental Music. Routledge KAYE, N. 2000. Site Specific Art: Performance, Place and Documentation. Routledge KAYE, N. 2006. Multi-media: Video - Installation – Performance. Routledge JUDD, F. 1961. Electronic music and musique concrete. Spearman OLIVEROS, P. 2005. Deep Listening : A Composer’s Sound Practice. iUniverse REEVE, F. 1992. Concrete Music. Pyncheon House TOOP, D. 2001. Ocean of Sound: Aether Talk, Ambient Sound and Imaginary Worlds. Serpent’s Tail 42
  43. 43. TREIB, M. 1997. Space Calculated in Seconds: The Philips Pavilion, Le Corbusier, Edgard Varese. Princeton University Press YOUNG, R (ed). 2002 Undercurrents, The Hidden Wiring of Modern Music. Continuum 10 Professional Status N/A 11 Student Feedback Student feedback will be elicited through the following: 5. Personal tutorials. 6. Critiques and seminar based discussions. 7. Student representative reports at Subject Boards. 8. A standard module feedback questionnaire will be used across the School of Art, Media and Design at the end of every module. Feedback will be analysed and a summary for each module will be kept with each relevant programme AME file of evidence in the School office. 43
  44. 44. Module Brief Title: Creative Music Practice Part Two Contents: Live sonic event Length: 10 – 15 minutes Additional Portfolio: Project portfolio and presentation Submission: Live Performance / Sound Studios Dates: Performance 18th December Audio CD and Project Folder before 2pm, 12th January, Presentations 15th January Weighting: Live event 75% Portfolio / Presentation 25% Retrieval: Audio CD containing a10 minute live performance and a 3 minute musique concrete composition Brief: This module has been concerned with developing skills, experience and understanding appropriate to live performance, time-based and site-specific work. You are therefore required to stage a public event that showcases your ability to create a live or time based sonic event within a network of similar performances / happenings. Your work must demonstrate the progression of your learning using the knowledge and skills acquired in CMP Part 1, using the improvised, experimental and avant-garde practices that you are becoming familiar with. You will work in groups to put together a live performance / time-based sonic event of 10 – 15 minutes. You’ll be expected to make use of the electronic and digital tools that you have engaged with during the module and your work must demonstrate a critical understanding of the theories and practices that have been raised. You’re also required to document your work and keep a project folder that contains your plans, ideas, photographs, research and downloads, as well as rehearsal and technical schedules. You will make a group presentation of your work at the end of the module where you will discuss your aims and intentions for the project, as well as outlining your research and supporting evidence that has informed your work. The project folder and presentation is an opportunity for you to explain and evaluate your work and provide evidence of your ability to manage your professional practice. In realising this brief, you should consider the assessment criteria below and make sure that you are able to answer the following questions: 44
  45. 45. Outcome - Does my work show that I’m developing musically and that I’m aware of what sounds good? - Have I taken on board everything from this module and really tried to make an interesting and engaging piece of music? - Do I know how to communicate well with the other musicians and with the audience? - Am I going to be able to showcase my solo as well as my ensemble musical abilities? Technical - Am I making live and recorded music that sounds professional? - How best can I present this music live? - What equipment or personnel do I need to put together a live performance? - Do I know how to get a good sound on stage and make sure that the audience can hear what’s going on? - Do I know how to set up, place and operate the microphones and other recording equipment in order to make a clear recording of my work? Critical Understanding - Does my work show that I have been listening to and engaging with the issues and music discussed in CSM1? - Does my work show that I understand and can perform music that is informed by a range of experimental and modernist ideas? Production Process (Research and Organisation) - Have I worked well with others in order to put this piece of music together? - How have I made the best use of my time during the production process? - Do I know how to describe the production/preparation process as well as the ideas behind my work? - Do I know how to evaluate my work and show that I have learned from the production and performance process? - Have I researched the project thoroughly, by using written, audio, visual materials? - Have I referenced my research and demonstrated clearly that my work is informed by a pro-active use of resources? If you are unsure about ANY of these points, don’t hesitate to ask for clarification with the programme team BEFORE your assessment. 45
  46. 46. Musicology of the 20th Century 46
  47. 47. Module Title: Musicology of the 20th Century Module Code: G106002 Level 4 Semester 1 Credits: 20 Module Leader: Matthew Lovett Duration (Hours): Supported Hours: 50 Directed Studies: 50 Independent Studies: 100 Assignment: Seminar Presentation, Written Paper and Research Folder Submission Date: Hand-in – 1pm, 12th January 2010 Presentations – 13th/14th January 2010 Place of Submission: Newport School of AMD reception, Caerleon Campus 47
  48. 48. The following intended as a guide to the Musicology of the 20th Century module, and supplements the validated programme document. This module, in conjunction with Creative Music Practice Part Ones and Two serves as a foundation to your studies at Newport, and will introduce you to a particular way of working with, and thinking about music. The main purpose of this module is to address many of the theoretical, conceptual and aesthetic issues associated with the developments in working with sound and music in the 20th century, with particular emphasis on experimental and improvisatory musical practices, technological innovation and Modernism. In this module, you’ll attend a number of lectures, listening and analysis sessions, seminars and tutorials. You’re also expected to supplement your studies with 100 hours of self-directed listening, reading and written work, including preparing and presenting seminar papers, which can be included your research folder. At the end of the module, you’ll be required to make a 15-minute seminar presentation of a 2000 word paper. You’ll also submit this paper as well as your research folder at the student desk. Your assessment will be take into account ALL of these elements. This module accounts for 20 credits and it is important to understand that you must submit work for this module in order to proceed to the next year of your studies. All the information given here is to help you cope with the demands of the module and get the most out of it. 48
  49. 49. The following pages are taken from the definitive programme document. Please pay special attention to all criteria and requirements. If you need to clarify anything at all please do not hesitate to ask for help from your tutor. 1 Rationale Students will be introduced to a sound and music history, with particular focus on the 20th century. Through selected case studies, students will reach an understanding of the nature of relevant musical texts and in particular within the avant-garde. Areas to be considered will be selected from the following: Atonalism, Serialism, Indeterminacy, Musique Concrête, Electroacoustic Music, Minimalism, Fluxus, Improvisation The module will invite students to question and debate their assumptions about music practice and the role of the musician/artist, in preparation for an exploration of the historical and theoretical context of music with modern culture. It will also begin to develop the ability to research, debate and communicate intellectual ideas within the context of contemporary music practice, and will lay the foundations for future academic and intellectual enquiry. Students will be introduced to theoretical and critical concepts key to process, innovation and experimentation in modern and contemporary music. Through selected case studies, students will reach an understanding of the nature of relevant musical texts and in particular those within the avant-garde. 2 Aims This module aims to: • Develop listening skills and music appreciation • Introduce and examine the developments of musical forms and texts in the modern period • Stimulate thought, discussions and debate which encourages further reading, listening and research • Develop an ability to comprehend and apply the parameters of context • Develop an understanding of the role and function of assessment, and to begin the development of a process of critical self analysis 3 Learning Outcomes On completion of the module, the student should be able to demonstrate the following: 1. The ability to confront, explore and debate ideas and communicate unfamiliar concepts, repertoires and practices in relation to music 2. A wide knowledge and experience of the repertoire(s) studied and the ability to understand theoretical and aesthetic systems 3. The ability to develop ideas and construct arguments in both verbal and written form and to evaluate such ideas and arguments critically 49
  50. 50. 4. The ability to carry out independent learning as a basis for academic study, presentation of individual and group work and for personal professional development 5. The ability to select and use research in a creative, independent and appropriate manner and to analyse and draw conclusions from research for future work 6. To recognise direct influences and quotations in one’s own and others’ work Learning Outcomes explained: - The ability to confront, explore and debate ideas and communicate unfamiliar concepts, repertoires and practices in relation to music - A wide knowledge and experience of the repertoire(s) studied and the ability to understand theoretical and aesthetic systems During your studies, you will come across a number of ideas and practices that are unfamiliar to you and you will be assessed on your ability to engage with and form your own opinions about them. As part of this module, you will also experience a great deal of music that is either new or unfamiliar to you and it is your responsibility to familiarise yourself with the relevant aesthetic (e.g. what it sounds like) and theoretical issues (e.g. what are the ideas and concepts associated with the music). - The ability to develop ideas and construct arguments in both verbal and written form and to evaluate such ideas and arguments critically - The ability to select and use research in a creative, independent and appropriate manner and to analyse and draw conclusions from research for future work Your papers and written work must be well thought out and contain logical, coherent arguments and if you have a particular idea that you want to explore, then you must be able to support your work with evidence of research such as quotations from credible websites, books, recordings, conference papers, journals etc. This is an important process for degree-level work and your research must not be based on anecdotal or unsubstantiated information. However, please bear in mind that you’re not on your own and the lectures, listening, seminars, reading lists and tutorials are designed to support you in collecting and referencing that evidence. - The ability to carry out independent learning as a basis for academic study, presentation of individual and group work and for personal professional development Your academic work at all times supports your creative studies and it’s vital that you take it seriously, since not only are you taking on board a number of new concepts and ideas at this stage, but you are also learning how to learn in preparation for your dissertation in Year 3. Therefore your work will be assessed in terms of your own professional development. - To recognise direct influences and quotations in one’s own and others’ work Finally, and perhaps most importantly, your work MUST be properly referenced and acknowledge ALL quotations and influences. If your work is found to be derivative in any way of other peoples’ work, and you haven’t flagged this up, then it could affect your grade and progression (see the Written Work, Referencing, Plagiarism and Unfair 50
  51. 51. Practice sections of this handbook). Please be careful to thoroughly check your work in this regard, take time to read through the relevant sections in this handbook and seek advice if you are unsure about any of this. 4 Indicative Content A series of lectures and seminars will introduce the basic concepts and historic developments of modern music, improvisation and new forms of notation in support of practice based teaching and learning. Students will be introduced to a range of musical perspectives through weekly lectures and listening/seminar sessions and encouraged to engage and debate in order to form their own individual perspective and approach. The historical and theoretical issues will then be explored in a further weekly seminar session where students are given the opportunity to read and discuss selected texts. Students will also be asked to undertake reading and research towards individual and group outcomes such as student led seminars. Example Content Week 5. Rethinking Music (The New Music) Two-hour listening and seminar session: Rationale To expose students to the challenges of modern music and the break with 200 years of Western composition where composers began to explore a greater variety of musical and compositional ideas. The session will include a brief introduction to Serialism, Dada, Darmstadt, and the music of Cage, Cowell, Partch, Nancarrow and Fluxus among others. Session Aims 1. To introduce students to a number of composers working in the early to mid 20th century. 2. To introduce musical innovations in the early to mid 20th century. 3. To study extra-musical influences and assess the changing nature of music. 4. To discuss early multimedia and interdisciplinary practices. Session Outcomes Students should be able to: 1. Discuss the transition between early modern composition and experimental composition; 2. Discuss key experimental composers of the early - mid 20th century; 3. Describe the key musical developments of the early - mid 20th century; 4. Critically evaluate a selection of experimental compositions. 51
  52. 52. Method Introduction to the session - what do we understand to be music - what constitutes a musical experience? Example 1: Ameriques (1921) - Edgard Varese (1883 - 1965). Discuss Varese as a key figure in the 20th century in terms of liberating sound and structure. Example 2: The Tiger (1930) by Henry Cowell (1897 - 1965). Discuss Cowell as a central figure in the early 20th century as a composer, theorist and publisher of others' work. Example 3: The Banshee (1925) by Henry Cowell. Discuss the piece as a forerunner to what many musicians and composers are still experimenting with and exploring today Example 4: Sonata II (1948) John Cage (1912 - 1992). Discuss John Cage as one of the most influential figures in 20th century music Example 5: Instructions to create a Random Poem (1916) by Tristan Tzara. Brief outline of Dada with a link to Fluxus Example 6: Comb Music (1959 - 1962) by George Brecht. Discuss the musical nature of Brecht's piece Example 7: Composition 1960 No. 7 (1960) La Monte Young. Discuss the musical nature of the piece Example 8: Le Marteau Sans Maitre (1957) - Pierre Boulez (b1925). Discuss the piece in relation to Serialism and discuss how a number of American composers sidestepped the European move towards Total Serialism, instead investigating the substance of music itself. Other sessions in the Musicology 1 series will include: Pythagoras and the Birth of Western Music, Start of the Century, Birth of the Modern Period, A Brief History of Improvisation, Minimalism and Other Directions in the Modern Age, European Ideas, Music and New Technologies 5 Teaching and Learning Strategy Will normally include the following: 1. Lectures and seminars will be used to introduce the ideas underpinning the module and to stimulate discussion and debate 2. Essay writing as a means of developing research techniques, acquiring knowledge, and presenting ideas and arguments in written form 3. Lectures and screenings will be used to introduce the ideas underpinning this module as well as CSM1, and to stimulate discussion and debate 4. Seminars: the debates introduced in the lectures and screenings will be developed in group discussion. Set text extracts will also be discussed 52
  53. 53. 5. Workshop sessions will address the acquisition of research, writing, communication and presentation skills and techniques 6. One to one tutorials supporting the individual development of self-direction and independent research 7. Essay writing as a means of developing research techniques, acquiring knowledge and presenting ideas and arguments in written form 8. Seminars (Running Discourse) will also be used for the discussion, development and critique of group proposals and to review research plans and work in progress, as well as for the presentation and discussion of group work by students and for formative feedback. Students will be asked to engage in a critical reflective debate as a process of informal and peer evaluation 9. Independent learning including directed reading and listening, related essay writing and practice for developing creative skills 10. Use of computer-assisted learning, including, email and internet-based discussion forums 11. A wide variety of extra-curricular activities, involving the participation in or attendance at performances and events 6 Assessment Requirements Seminar Paper (Summative) Students will be required to make a 15-minute seminar presentation supported by a properly referenced 2000 word paper and a research folder containing a range of specified and annotated materials. You will be assessed at a presentation to the peer group, and the supporting evidence must be submitted prior to the presentation. This will form 100% of the final module grade (Learning outcomes 1 – 6) and students must achieve a minimum of D5 in order to achieve credit. This will form 100% of the final module grade. The module can be retrieved in the event of failure. Mid-Term Assessment (Formative) You will be required to present a synopsis of the M1 seminar paper (see below for title), demonstrating how it relates to the issues and concepts contained in the module as well as a research folder. As part of this process, there will be an opportunity for you to discuss your overall progress in the module and get feedback from your tutor. What is formative assessment? Formative assessment is an interim 'work in progress' diagnosis carried out during the assignment period, providing you with the opportunity for feedback from the programme staff. The purpose of this input is to give you advice on "where you are at" with the project and how to improve the quality of learning. Formative assessment maybe carried out through group or individual tutorials and critiques. What is summative assessment? Summative assessment is more comprehensive in nature and is used to check the level of the student’s learning at the end of an assignment (here the student will be assigned a final grade subject to Exam Board ratification, using the Assessment Criteria set out 53

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