Practical User Research: A Crash Course

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User feedback is critical to designing great interactive experiences! If you’ve ever wanted to get amazing user feedback but never have the time or budget to do any research, then this workshop is for …

User feedback is critical to designing great interactive experiences! If you’ve ever wanted to get amazing user feedback but never have the time or budget to do any research, then this workshop is for you! In just 3 short hours, I’ll demonstrate how quality user feedback is actually within the reach of any organization, project, budget, or schedule… even yours! I’ll also empower you with the tools and skills you need to do research in the real world.

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  • 1. PRACTICAL  USER  RESEARCH:A  CRASH  COURSE  #MWC_PRACTICALUX1
  • 2. INTROS2h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/mytudut/5188623575/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • 3. ABOUT  ME  3Ma3hew  Doty  @ma$hewjdotyUser  Experience  LeaderWhole-­‐brained  Thinkificator  All-­‐around  Swell  Guy
  • 4. 4http://marketingpie.risdall.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Tron-fight-for-the-user.jpg
  • 5. WHO  I’VE  DONE  WORK  FOR  TargetBest  BuyLife  Time  FitnessOfficeMaxSearsMarrio$KraK  FoodsHarland  ClarkeArrow  ElectronicsHalliburtonPennwellAshley  FurnitureGoldman  SachsPNCAT&TCTU  OnlineAIU  OnlineJC  Penny  
  • 6. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGABOUT  EVANTAGE  6-­‐ BouSque  customer  experience  consultancy  based  in  Minneapolis.  -­‐ Founded  in  1999.-­‐ Consistently  ranked  one  of  the  best  places  to  work.-­‐ Offers...  -­‐ Customer  Experience  Strategy  -­‐ Digital  Strategy,  Experience  Design,  and  ImplementaSon  -­‐ Performance  OpSmizaSon
  • 7. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGABOUT  YOU...7• Who  are  you?• What’s  your  problem?• What  do  you  want  from  me?http://www.flickr.com/photos/86979666@N00/7623744452/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • 8. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGOBJECTIVES  1.Demonstrate  how  quality  user  insights  are  actually  within  the  reach  of  any  organizaSon,  project,  budget,  or  schedule…  even  yours!  2.Empower  you  with  the  basic  tools  and  skills  you  need  to  start  doing  pracScal  research  of  your  own.  3.Send  you  off  with  at  some  kind  of  real  insight  for  your  parScular  project/problem.8
  • 9. OUR  AGENDA91:00  Learn  about  user  research  and  select  your  technique1:30  Learn  your  technique2:00  Design  &  conduct  your  study  (take  breaks  as  needed)3:15  Document  &  Present  your  findings  3:45  Wrap  up
  • 10. WARNING10We  will  be  moving  fast  I  will  require  your  parScipaSonThis  will  be  awesome
  • 11. LEARN  ABOUT  USER  RESEARCH  &  SELECT  YOUR  TECHNIQUE11
  • 12. WHAT  IS  USER  RESEARCH?12
  • 13. USER  RESEARCH13An  set  of  acSviSes  that  help  us...  1. Understand  the  people  who  will  be  actually  using  what  we’re  designing.  2. Validate  our  decisions/assumpSons  throughout  the  project.
  • 14. PRACTICAL  USER  RESEARCH14A  flexible  approach  to  user  research  which  delivers  many  of  the  benefits  of  user  insight  while  remaining  sensiSve  to  Sme  and  budget  constraints.
  • 15. WHY  SHOULD  WE  DO  USER  RESEARCH?15
  • 16. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTING 16h$ps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnZyc5LrVEs
  • 17. SO,  WHAT  WENT  WRONG?17NONE  OF  THE  DECISIONS  WERE  BASED  ON  DATA!
  • 18. WHY  SHOULD  WE  DO  USER  RESEARCH?18TO  GET  DATA  THAT  HELPS  US...
  • 19. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGOVERCOME  PERSONAL  BIAS19
  • 20. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGCOUNTER  IVORY  TOWER  DESIGN20http://www.flickr.com/photos/dplanet/94441587/
  • 21. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGREPLACE  THE  ELASTIC  USER21
  • 22. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTING16© 2006 Steve Krug. Used with permission of the author.AVOID  RELIGIOUS  DEBATES
  • 23. MYTHS  OF  USER  RESEARCH23
  • 24. 1.  WE  DON’T  NEED  TO  DO  USER  RESEARCH“We’re  smart  enough  to  get  it  right!”“Users  don’t  know  what  they  want!”“We’ll  just  fix  anything  aKer  we  go  live.”24h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/evertwh/2723737126/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 25. 2.  WE  DON’T  HAVE  THE  BUDGETToo  oKen,  we  think  “research”  automaScally  means  expensive  labs,  recruiSng  fees  and  expensive  research  partners.25h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/danmoyle/5634567317/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 26. 3.  WE  DON’T  HAVE  THE  TIME“We  can  only  test  our  exact  target  audience.”“I  can’t  have  my  development  team  sirng  on  their  hands!”26http://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/2661425133/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  • 27. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGTHE  REALITY• User  research  yields  cost  &  Sme  savings  as  well  as  happy,  loyal,  producSve  users.• Insights  can  be  gained  without  all  the  bells  and  whistles.  • Parallel  paths  &  informal  methods  can  reduce  or  eliminate  extra  Sme  needed.27
  • 28. WHAT  KIND  OF  RESEARCH  SHOULD  WE  DO?    28
  • 29. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGAccess to UsersTime&BudgetFORMALWHAT  KIND  OF  RESEARCH  SHOULD  WE  DO?  29FORMALINFORMAL
  • 30. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGAccess to UsersTime&BudgetFORMALWHAT  KIND  OF  RESEARCH  SHOULD  WE  DO?  30SECONDARY PRIMARY
  • 31. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGUSER  RESEARCH  DECISION  MODEL31Access to UsersTime&BudgetFORMALPRIMARYFORMALSECONDARYINFORMALSECONDARYINFORMALPRIMARYAdapted from http://matthewjdoty.com/img/research.pngUsed with Permission
  • 32. WHEN  SHOULD  WE  DO  USER  RESEARCH?32
  • 33. THE  SHORT  ANSWER...33EARLY  &  OFTEN
  • 34. THE  LONGER  ANSWER...34IT  DEPENDS...
  • 35. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGWATERFALL35DISCOVERDEFINEDESIGNDEVELOPDEPLOYEthnographyUser  InterviewsFocus  Groups  SurveysBaseline  User  Tesng  Web  Metrics  AnalysisSecondary  ResearchCard  SorngTree-­‐tesngConcept  Tesng  Usability  TesngConcept  Tesng  Usability  Tesng    Usability  Tesng    SurveysBaseline  User  Tesng  Web  Metrics  AnalysisA/B  TesngMVT
  • 36. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGAGILE36UX SPRINT 1 UX SPRINT 2 UX SPRINT 3DEV SPRINT 0 DEV SPRINT 1 DEV SPRINT 2 DEV SPRINT 3ENVISIONINGEthnographyUser  InterviewsFocus  Groups  SurveysBaseline  User  Tesng  Web  Metrics  AnalysisSecondary  ResearchCard  SorngTree-­‐tesngConcept  Tesng  Usability  Tesng    Card  SorngTree-­‐tesngConcept  Tesng  Usability  TesngCard  SorngTree-­‐tesngConcept  Tesng  Usability  TesngUsability  Tesng     Usability  Tesng    
  • 37. WHO    SHOULD  DO  THE  RESEARCH?37
  • 38. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTING              YOU!38http://www.flickr.com/photos/subharnab/2721507697/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • 39. WHAT  TECHNIQUES  SHOULD  I  USE?39
  • 40. WHAT  QUESTIONS  ARE  YOU  TRYING  TO  ANSWER?How  do  they  want                        to  interact?Card  SorSng  (open)Design  Games/WorkshopsFocus  GroupsSurveysBaseline  Usability  TesSngTask  Analysis40Who  is  our  audience  &  what  do  they  need?Contextual  Inquiry  (Ethnography)InterviewsFocus  GroupsSurveysDiariesWhat  do  they  think  of  what  we’ve  done?Concept  TesSngUsability  TesSngCard  sorSng  (closed/reverse)Tree  TesSngContextual  InquiryAnalysis  of  Web  MetricsA/B,  MVT  tesSng
  • 41. WHAT  QUESTIONS  ARE  YOU  TRYING  TO  ANSWER?How  do  they  want                        to  interact?Card  SorVng  (open)Design  Games/WorkshopsFocus  GroupsSurveysBaseline  Usability  TesVngTask  Analysis41Who  is  our  audience  &  what  do  they  need?Contextual  Inquiry  (Ethnography)InterviewsFocus  GroupsSurveysDiariesWhat  do  they  think  of  what  we’ve  done?Concept  TesSngUsability  TesVngCard  sorVng  (closed/reverse)Tree  TesVngContextual  InquiryAnalysis  of  Web  MetricsA/B,  MVT  tesSng
  • 42. WHAT  IS  CARD  SORTING?A  research  technique  that  aims  to  understand  how  people  organize  and  group  informaSon.  Results  can  be  used  to  structure  the  site/app  in  more  intuiSve  way.42
  • 43. WHAT  IS  TREE  TESTING?A  research  technique  that  aims  to  uncover  issues  with  labeling  &  findability.  Results  are  used  to  inform  the  design/organizaSon  of  your  menu/navigaSon.    43
  • 44. WHAT  IS  USABILITY  TESTING?A  research  technique  that  aims  to  validate  decisions  and  catch  usability  issues.    Results  can  be  used  to...• Fix  issues  before  producSon• Inform  the  next  release• Inform  a  redesign44
  • 45. WHICH  TECHNIQUE  SHOULD  YOU  USE?45
  • 46. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGNOW  WHAT?    • Break  into  groups  based  on  your  technique.• Prepare  to  be  amazed  at  what  you  can  do.    46http://www.flickr.com/photos/21496790@N06/5065834411/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 47. OUR  AGENDA471:00  Learn  about  user  research  and  select  your  technique1:30  Learn  your  technique2:00  Design  &  conduct  your  study  (take  breaks  as  needed)3:15  Document  &  Present  your  findings  3:45  Wrap  up
  • 48. LEARN  YOUR  SELECTED  TECHNIQUE48
  • 49. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGTHE  CORE  STAGES  OF  USER  RESEARCH  1. ArSculate  your  objecSves2. Design  the  study  3. Recruit  parScipants4. Conduct  the  study5. Analyze  the  findings6. Document  the  findings  &  recommendaSons49
  • 50. USABILITY  TESTING  10150
  • 51. HOW  DOES  USABILITY  TESTING  WORK?1. Show  the  user  interface  (a  sketch,  mockup,  prototype  or  the  actual  site/app)2. Ask  the  parScipant  to  perform  a  task3. Observe  interacSons  &  take  notes  51
  • 52. HOW  MANY  PARTICIPANTS  ARE  NEEDED?52AT  LEAST  5 http://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users/
  • 53. HOW  DO  I  DESIGN  A  USABILITY  STUDY?1. IdenSfy  the  pages/screens/elements  where  you’d  like  to  have  user  feedback2. Clearly  arSculate  and  document  your  goals  with  each  page/screen/element  and  what  successful  interacSon  looks  like3. Create  realisSc  scenarios  &  tasks  that  will  elicit  credible  feedback.53
  • 54. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGIDENTIFY  PAGES/SCREENS/ELEMENTS• Which  ones  are  required  for  the  criScal  tasks?• Which  ones  perform  poorly  in  your  web  analyScs?• Which  ones  are  causing  the  most  internal  disagreement  (e.g.  religious  debates)?• Which  ones  are  falling  vicSm  to  ivory  tower  design?• Which  ones  represent  a  risk  you  are  taking?54
  • 55. EXAMPLE:  ARTICULATE  YOUR  GOALSThe  goal  of  this  study  is  to  observe  user  interacSons  with  the  site  to  see  if  parScipants...• Are  able  to  successfully  use  the  navigaSon  (main  and  secondary)  to  complete  tasks.• Are  successfully  able  to  idenSfy  links  (they  know  what  a  link  is  and  what  is  not  link).• Understand  terminology  and  labels.55
  • 56. EXAMPLES:  SCENARIOS  &  TASKSLet’s  say  that  you  entered  [SEARCH  TERM}  into  Google.  and  clicked  on  the  link  for  [WEBSITE].  This  is  the  home  page  of  the  new  site.  Without  clicking  on  anything,  take  a  few  moments  to  look  it  over  and  take  it  in.  (COUNT  TO  10,  THEN  ASK  THE  FOLLOWING  QUESTIONS)• What  are  your  first  impressions?  • What  can  you  do?• What  would  you  do  first?• What’s  missing?56
  • 57. EXAMPLES:  SCENARIOS  &  TASKSFrom  what  we  understand  you  are  in  the  market  for  a  [PRODUCT].  I’d  like  you  show  me  what  you  would  do  find  and  add  [PRODUCT]  to  your  cart.Tell  me  about  a  me  that  you  were  looking  for  [PRODUCT].  I’d  like  you  now  to  put  yourself  back  in  that  situaon  and  show  me  what  you  would  do  find  and  add  [PRODUCT]  to  your  cart.57
  • 58. 58
  • 59. CARD  SORTING  10159
  • 60. HOW  DOES  CARD  SORTING  WORK?Open  SorSng  1. People  are  given  a  set  of  “cards”  that  represent  features/content  of  the  site/app.  2. They  organize  informaSon  into  groups  which  make  sense  to  them.  3. They  name  each  of  the  groups.  60
  • 61. Closed  SorSng1. People  are  given  a  set  of  “cards”  that  represent  features/content  of  the  site/app.  2. They  organize  informaSon  into  several  pre-­‐defined  groups  in  a  way  that  makes  sense  to  them.HOW  DOES  CARD  SORTING  WORK?61
  • 62. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGIDEAS  FOR  CREATING  YOUR  “CARDS”62• Use  your  current  site  and  create  a  card  for  items  in  your  navigaSon  &  important  features.• Create  a  conceptual  feature  list  for  the  new  site  or  app  you  are  thinking  of  building  and  use  the  items  in  this  list.• Look  to  your  web  metrics  to  see  what  areas  of  the  site  may  be  experiencing  issues  related  to  site  organizaSon.
  • 63. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGHOW  MANY  CARDS  SHOULD  I  MAKE?6320  -­‐  50
  • 64. HOW  MANY  PARTICIPANTS  ARE  NEEDED?64In  card  sorSng,  “...theres  only  a  0.75  correlaSon  between  the  results  from  five  users  and  the  ulSmate  results.”  “You  must  test  fiKeen  users  to  reach  a  correlaSon  of  0.90,  which  is  a  more  comfortable  place  to  stop.”http://www.nngroup.com/articles/card-sorting-how-many-users-to-test/AT  LEAST  15
  • 65. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGHOW  DO  I  DESIGN  A  CARD  SORT?65h2p://uxpunk.com/websort/
  • 66. 66
  • 67. TREE  TESTING  10167
  • 68. HOW  DOES  TREE  TESTING  WORK?1. Present  a  basic  menu  of  opSons.2. Ask  people  to  find  key  features  and  content.3. Analyze  how  oKen  tasks  are  successfully  completed.68
  • 69. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGIDEAS  FOR  CREATING  YOUR  TEST• Which  navigaSon  elements  are  needed  for  criScal  tasks?• Which  ones  perform  poorly  in  your  web  analyScs?• Which  ones  are  most  likely  to  lead  to  revenue  generaSon?• Which  ones  are  suspected  of  poor  labeling?69
  • 70. HOW  MANY  PARTICIPANTS  ARE  NEEDED?70• Since  it’s  similar  to  usability  tesSng,  some  say  at  least  5.  • Since  it’s  Similar  to  card  sorSng,  some  say  at  least  15.• Tree  tesSng  vendors  will  recommend  a  minimum  of  40-­‐50.IT  DEPENDS...QUICKER  TURNAROUND  MORE  RELIABLE
  • 71. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGHOW  DO  I  DESIGN  A  TREE  TEST?71h2p://uxpunk.com/plainframe/
  • 72. 72
  • 73. OUR  AGENDA731:00  Learn  about  user  research  and  select  your  technique1:30  Learn  your  technique2:00  Design  &  conduct  your  study  (take  breaks  as  needed)3:15  Document  &  Present  your  findings  3:45  Wrap  up
  • 74. DESIGN  &  CONDUCT  YOUR  STUDIES74
  • 75. DOS  AND  DON’TS  OF  IN-­‐PERSON  RESEARCHDo...• Dress  appropriately• Bring  business  cards• Ask  open-­‐ended  quesSons• Use  words  other  than  those  used  in  what  you  are  researching• Ask  the  parScipant  to  “think  out  loud”Don’t...• Sigh  or  groan  if  the  parScipant  makes  an  incorrect  choice  or  misstates  something• Ask  leading  quesSons  • Ask  closed-­‐ended/manipulaSve  quesSons• “Help”  or  correct  the  parScipant75
  • 76. DESIGN  &  CONDUCT  YOUR  STUDIESDesign1. Build  your  study  based  on  real  problems  you  face  2. Work  as  a  group  to  solve  issues  &  quesSons  but  use  me  as  a  resource  if  you  get  stuckConduct  1. Use  your  group  as  study  subjects2. Decide  within  your  group  whose  studies  you  will  run3. Run  your  studies4. Work  as  a  group  to  solve  issues  &  quesSons  but  use  me  as  a  resource  if  you  get  stuck76
  • 77. HOW  DID  THAT  GO?  77
  • 78. OUR  AGENDA781:00  Learn  about  user  research  and  select  your  technique1:30  Learn  your  technique2:00  Design  &  conduct  your  study  (take  breaks  as  needed)3:15  Document  &  Present  your  findings  3:45  Wrap  up
  • 79. DOCUMENT  &  PRESENT  YOUR  FINDINGS79
  • 80. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGHOW  DO  I  ANALYZE  A  CARD  SORT?80h2p://uxpunk.com/websort/
  • 81. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGIT’S  ALL  ABOUT  RELATIONSHIPS81VerScal  lines  closer  to  the  leK  indicate  stronger  relaSonships  between  items  VerScal  lines  further  to  the  right  indicate  weaker  relaSonships  between  items  
  • 82. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGHOW  DO  I  ANALYZE  A  TREE  TEST?82h2p://uxpunk.com/plainframe/
  • 83. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGSUCCESSES  VS.  FAILS83
  • 84. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGPATHS  TAKEN84Imagine  you  are  invesSgaSng  universiSes  and  wish  to  obtain  a  Masters  degree.  Where  would  you  expect  to  find  out  if  this  university  offered  the  parScular  Masters  you  were  looking  for?ParVcipant  1:1. Departments  &  Academics  >  Graduate  ProgramsParVcipant  21. Future  Students  >  Graduate  Students  2. Departments  &  Academics  >  Graduate  ProgramsParVcipant  31. Future  Students  >  Graduate  Students  2. Departments  &  Academics  >  Graduate  ProgramsParVcipant  41. Future  Students  >  Graduate  Students  2. Departments  &  Academics  >  Graduate  ProgramsParVcipant  51. Departments  &  Academics  >  Graduate  Programs
  • 85. HOW  DO  I  FIND  THE  “NUGGETS”?85
  • 86. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGNUGGETS  86
  • 87. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGFINDING  THE  NUGGETS  87• ParScularly  impressive/inspiring  moments/results• “Eureka!”  moments  (yours  or  the  parScipant’s)• “What  the..?!?!”  moments/results• Surprising  moments/resultshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsaab/4732416270/
  • 88. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGEXAMPLES  OF  NUGGETS  • ParScipants  struggled  to  find  the  login.• Unexpectedly,  parScipants  engaged  in  horizontal  scrolling  behavior  and  expressed  that  they  preferred  it.• Racquetball  and  kids  camps  showed  a  very  strong  relaSonship.• Everyone  found  yoga  on  the  first  try.88
  • 89. HOW  DO  I  DELIVER  THE  FACTS  IN  COMPELLING  WAYS?89
  • 90. TELL  A  COMPELLING  STORY“The  next  Sme  you  struggle  with  gerng  people  on  board  with  your  projects  and  ideas,  simply  tell  them  a  story...    ...storytelling  is  the  only  way  to  plant  ideas  into  other  peoples  minds.”  Leo  WidrichThe  Science  of  Storytelling:  Why  Telling  a  Story  is  the  Most  Powerful  Way  to  AcSvate  Our  Brains(h2p://lifehacker.com/5965703/the-­‐science-­‐of-­‐storytelling-­‐why-­‐telling-­‐a-­‐story-­‐is-­‐the-­‐most-­‐powerful-­‐way-­‐to-­‐acvate-­‐our-­‐brains)90
  • 91. CONNECT  THE  DOTS...  IN  THE  STUDY91ParScipants  do  not  feel  confident  about  the  purchaseParScipants  spent  a  lot  of  Sme  going  back  &  forth  between  the  PLP  and  the  PDP.    ParScipants  commented  size  and  fit  are                  the  most  important  consideraSons                  when  buying  something  like  this                        online.  ParScipants  were  reluctant  to  add            items  to  their  cart.          
  • 92. CONNECT  THE  DOTS...  OUTSIDE  THE  STUDY92User  ResearchStakeholder  InterviewsCompeVVve  AnalysisWeb  AnalyVcsFindings  in  Context
  • 93. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGTAKE  10  MINUTES...• Look  for  the  nuggets  in  your  study.  • Start  connecSng  dots  and  forming  a  story.93http://www.flickr.com/photos/33909700@N02/3159761620/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  • 94. HOW  DID  THAT  GO?WHO  WANTS  TO  SHARE?  94
  • 95. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jakecaptive/3205277810/sizes/l/in/photostream/THOUGHTFUL  PAUSEUser  research  does  not  uncover  everything.We  should  manage  our  client’s/team’s  expectaSons.95
  • 96. OUR  AGENDA961:00  Learn  about  user  research  and  select  your  technique1:30  Learn  your  technique2:00  Design  &  conduct  your  study  (take  breaks  as  needed)3:15  Document  &  Present  your  findings  3:45  Wrap  up
  • 97. WRAP  UP97
  • 98. WHEN    SHOULD  I  HIRE  EXPERTS?98
  • 99. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGWHEN  SHOULD  I  HIRE  EXPERTS?99Access to UsersTime&BudgetFORMALPRIMARYFORMALSECONDARYINFORMALSECONDARYINFORMALPRIMARY
  • 100. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGWHEN  SHOULD  I  HIRE  EXPERTS?100When  you  need...• Dedicated  resources• Specialized  experSse• Help  to  avoid  mistakes• External  perspecSves• A  fresh  set  of  eyes• An  objecSve  point  of  view• Help  negoSaSng  differences  of  opinion• TrainingAdapted  from:  h2p://www.fresh-­‐sprouts.com/2011/04/when-­‐to-­‐hire-­‐consultants/  h2p://www.planning.org/consultants/choosing/part1.htmh2p://managementconsulted.com/consulng-­‐skills/6-­‐reasons-­‐why-­‐companies-­‐hire-­‐management-­‐consultants-­‐that-­‐charge-­‐2-­‐million-­‐for-­‐3-­‐months-­‐of-­‐work/h2p://www.nonprofinclusiveness.org/why-­‐hire-­‐consultant-­‐0
  • 101. GUIDING      PRINCIPLES101
  • 102. h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/ekilby/2484798276/sizes/o/in/photostream/GET  USER  INSIGHT  EARLY  &  OFTEN102
  • 103. h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/ericmcgregor/346990046/sizes/m/in/photostream/FOCUS  ON  THEHEAVY  HITTERS  103
  • 104. h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/supersonicphotos/4483487579/sizes/l/in/photostream/SOMETHING  IS  BETTER  THANNOTHING  104
  • 105. ©  2013  EVANTAGE  CONSULTINGRECOMMENDED  READING  105
  • 106. h2p://www.flickr.com/photos/thuanygabriela/4818584778/sizes/l/in/photostream/THANK  YOU  MINNEWEBCONYOU  ROCK!!!106@MATTHEWJDOTY