Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Take On Terror
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Take On Terror

1,666

Published on

Take on Terror is QCIC\'s regular White Paper on terrorism

Take on Terror is QCIC\'s regular White Paper on terrorism

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,666
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
131
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.   2010                        [TAKE ON TERROR]  The definitive source for fact‐based analysis of Terrorism Risk       
  • 2.                        © QCIC Ltd 2010  This  document  has  been  prepared  by  QCIC  Ltd  (“QCIC”)  on  a  best  endeavours  basis.    Any  information  provided  by  third  parties  and  referred  to  herein  has  not  been  checked  or  verified  by  QCIC, unless otherwise expressly stated.  No third party may rely upon this document without the  prior and express written agreement of QCIC.    This document is copyright QCIC Ltd 2010 and is made available free of charge.   No third party may reproduce the information contained in this document without the prior written  consent of the company.    
  • 3.     [FOREWORD]  Terrorism is one of the most prominent and high  profile phenomena of our age.  It is dynamic – the  nature  and  extent  of  the  risk  changes  “ Last year there were  relentlessly.  Analysis of terrorism can be subject  on average 27 terror  ” to emotions or subjective bias.  At QCIC we base  our analysis on facts and statistics.  This ensures  attacks every day  that  we  remain  objective  and  our  analysis  and  advice remains grounded.  [TAKE ON TERROR] aims to set out the current situation clearly and succinctly.  It aims to do so in  a cool and level‐headed manner.  In producing the paper, QCIC has examined over 60,000 recorded  terrorist  incidents  in  the  past  five  years  using  data  supplied  by  the  US  Government  and  other  trusted  sources.    We  have  based  our  analysis  on  the  facts  and on  official  and  reliable  statistics  so  that your organisation’s risk assessments can be evidence‐based.  It may come as something of a surprise to learn that in the year ending June 2009 there were over  10,000 terrorist incidents across the world.  On average that is 27 terror attacks every day.  For global businesses this reality it is a significant concern – or it should be.  In an age of increasing  stakeholder  expectations  and  legislative  requirements,  organisations  cannot  ignore  it.    As  well  as  setting out the current position, the paper also sets out some of the ways in which your organisation  can  take  on  terrorism  in  your  workplace;  through  improved  resilience  and  planning  which  will  ensure that some of terrorism’s sting is removed in the event of an incident.     I  trust  you  find  this  paper  a  valuable  reference  and  that  it  brings  forward  some  useful  ideas  and  commentary.  .        Matthew Horrox  Director of Intelligence  QCIC  1 January 2010      [TAKE ON TERROR]   i   
  • 4.     [CONTENTS]  [GLOBAL TERRORISM] .................................................................................................................... 1  Targeted territories ....................................................................................................................... 2  Heat map ...................................................................................................................................... 3  Suicide terrorism ........................................................................................................................... 4  [SIX STATES TO WATCH] ................................................................................................................. 5  [IRAQ] ............................................................................................................................................... 6  Current context ............................................................................................................................. 6  Slow improvement ........................................................................................................................ 6  Turning the tide ............................................................................................................................ 6  Suicide terrorism ........................................................................................................................... 7  Elections 2010 ............................................................................................................................... 8  [PAKISTAN] ...................................................................................................................................... 9  Problem areas ............................................................................................................................... 9  Suicide terrorism ......................................................................................................................... 10  International dimensions .............................................................................................................. 11  Political instability ........................................................................................................................ 11  [AFGHANISTAN] ............................................................................................................................ 12  Suicide terrorism .......................................................................................................................... 13  America’s bleak options ............................................................................................................... 13  [ISRAEL] ......................................................................................................................................... 14  Suicide terrorism ......................................................................................................................... 15  Stalled peace process .................................................................................................................. 15  [INDIA] ............................................................................................................................................ 16  Trouble spots ............................................................................................................................... 17  Suicide terrorism .......................................................................................................................... 17  Mumbai massacre ........................................................................................................................ 17  [RUSSIA] ......................................................................................................................................... 18  ii  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 5.   Suicide terrorism ......................................................................................................................... 18  [TAKING ON TERROR] ................................................................................................................... 20  Globalisation and security risk management ............................................................................... 21  Protecting physical assets ........................................................................................................... 21  Protecting people........................................................................................................................ 21  Protecting reputation .................................................................................................................. 22  Protecting your business ............................................................................................................. 22  The value of getting expert advice .............................................................................................. 22  [TERRORISM RANKINGS] .............................................................................................................. 23              [TAKE ON TERROR]  iii   
  • 6.     [DEFINITIONS]  [TERRORISM] occurs when groups or individuals acting on political motivation deliberately  or recklessly attack civilians / non‐combatants or their property and the attack does not fall  into another category of violence such as crime or rioting.        iv  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 7.     [GLOBAL TERRORISM]  In the year ending June 2009 there were 10,946 recorded terrorist incidents, 15% fewer than in the  same period in the previous year.  The drop is almost all accounted for by a significant reduction in  the number of attacks in Iraq.   The underlying global terrorism level, excluding data from Iraq and  Afghanistan remains relatively stable.  5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 All Other Countries Iraq Afghanistan Figure 2a: Global Terrorism ‐ Number of Incidents (5 year trend)  During 2008/09, the numbers of people killed and seriously injured fell too: the number killed fell to  15,265 while the number seriously injured fell to 30,352 – a fall of 13 and 16 per cent respectively.  25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Killed Seriously Injured Figure 2b: Global Terrorism ‐ Killed and Injured (5 year trend)  Conversely, the numbers of people held hostage rose to 9,813, an increase of 123% year‐on‐year.   This sharp upswing is accounted for by a few major incidents, including an incident on 2 May 2009 in  which Taliban forces took 2,000 civilians hostage for use as human shields in the village of Pir Baba  [TAKE ON TERROR]   1   
  • 8.   in  North‐West  Frontier  Province,  Pakistan,  and  between  28  June  and  1  July  2009  when  HAMAS  gunmen kidnapped 515 Fatah members in the Gaza Strip.  20,000  15,000  10,000  5,000  ‐ Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Hostages   Figure 2c: Global Terrorism ‐ Hostages (5 year trend)  Targeted territories  QCIC has ranked each country by number of terrorist incidents suffered in 2008/09.  The top ten are  shown in the table below along with the number of incidents suffered in 2007/08.    Number of Incidents     Rank  Territory  2007/08  2008/09  Trend  1  Iraq  4,428  2,534  2  Pakistan  1,342  2,191  3  Afghanistan  1,103  1,403  4  Israel  1,173  802  5  India  818  692  6  Russia  330  483  7  Somalia  494  451  8  Thailand  771  448  9  Philippines  282  384  10  Colombia  366  303  Figure 2d: Global Terrorism ‐ Top 10 Countries by Rank  Iraq  and  Pakistan  remain  ranked  at  one  and  two  respectively  for  another  year,  while  Afghanistan  and Israel have traded third and fourth place.  Philippines, at eleven last year, saw a sharp increase  in  incidents  and  is  now  ranked  ninth.    Nepal,  previously  at  seven  with  637  incidents  dropped  to  eleven with “only” 161 attacks following the establishment of a republic.            2  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 9.                                                         Heat map  The deeper the shade of  red, the more terrorist  incidents occurred in  2008/09  Figure 2e: Global Terrorism Heat Map 2008‐09    [TAKE ON TERROR]  3   
  • 10.   Suicide terrorism  The incidence of suicide terrorism has been generally on a decline since its peak in December 2006.   Much  of  the  reduction  is  accounted  for  by  the  improvements  to  the  security  situation  in  Iraq.   Afghanistan and Pakistan are the two other principal territories afflicted and in each of these suicide  terrorism  is  becoming  increasingly  prevalent.    Sporadic  attacks  have  occurred  in  other  territories  but with little pattern.    10 20 30 40 50 60 0   January February Somalia Iraq Afghanistan March April May   June 2004 July August   September October Spain Israel Algeria November December   January February March   April May June   2005 Sri Lanka Jordan Bangladesh July August September October   November December January   February Figure 2f: Global Suicide Terrorism 2004‐09  Syria Moldova China March April May   June 2006 July August   September October Turkey Morocco Egypt November December     January February March   April May June   2007 United Kingdom Pakistan Gaza Strip July August September October   November December January   February Uzbekistan Qatar India March April May   June 2008 July August   September October West Bank Russia Indonesia November December   January February March   April May June   2009 Yemen Saudi Arabia Iran July August September October   November December     4  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 11.     [SIX STATES TO WATCH]  Of the 10,946 recorded terrorism incidents in 2008/09, 8,105 occurred in the top six countries.  That  accounts for approximately three quarters of all incidents.  Full analysis of all territories and groups,  including data to the end 2009 is available from the QCIC Intelligence Unit upon request.      [TAKE ON TERROR]  5   
  • 12.     [IRAQ]  Current context  The situation in Iraq today (in January 2010) is coloured by the upcoming elections in March.  During  the  run  up  to  the  elections  it  is  very  likely  that  there  will  be  a  sustained  and  sharp  upswing  in  violence.  This may well impact the Obama Administration’s plan for troop withdrawal during 2010.    Slow improvement  Taking a broader  view,  the  situation in  Iraq has  been slowly improving from the  peak in Q1  2007,  although  during  the  year  there  has  been  a  slight  upswing  following  the  withdrawal  of  US  troops  from towns and cities.    At the height of violence there were over 7,400 attacks (in the year Q3 2006‐Q2 2007).  The number  of attacks has fallen steadily and now stands at a comparatively good (although disastrous by other  standards) 2,534 incidents in 2008/09.  In this period 3,765 people were killed, 10,827 were injured  and  64  people  were  taken  hostage.    Of  these,  perhaps  most  notable  statistic  is  the  decline  in  hostage taking – down from its peak of 2,083 in Q3 2006‐Q2 2007.  12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Number Terrorist Incidents People Killed People Injured Hostages Taken Figure 3a: Iraq Terrorism Incidents (5 year trend)  Turning the tide  Factors  in  the  reduction  of  violence  include  the  surge  in  US  troops,  enlisting  the  support  of  tribal  elders to fight militias and the improving capability of the Iraqi national army.  US troops have now  withdrawn from towns and cities and are (according to current plans) due to end combat operations  in September 2010 and withdraw all troops by the end of 2011.  Iraqi security forces are now taking  on an expanded role.  That said al‐Qa’ida in Iraq (AQI) and other Iranian‐backed Shi’a groups remain  6  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 13.   active in many areas and it will be interesting to observe the extent to which the US can withdraw in  2010, particularly given elections in March which will likely trigger an upswing in violence.   Many areas in the south of the country are now considerably safer than they were, although by any  other yardstick other than Iraq’s recent past, they would be considered unsafe areas.  Turkey   Turkey DAHŪK Dahūk ARBIL Iraq Mosul NĪNAWÁ Arbil As Sulaymānīyah DAHŪK Kirkūk   Syria KIRKŪK Dahūk ŞALĀH AD DĪN Samarra’ DIYĀLÁ Iran Ba’qūbah Ar Ramadi Al Fallujāh BAGHDĀD     Baghdād Jordan AL ĀNBAR Karbalā’ BĀBIL WĀSIT Al Kūt  No terrorist events   ARBIL KARBALĀ Al Hillah Ad Diwānīyah MAYSĀN An Najaf AL QĀDISĪYAH Al ‘Amārah  At least 1 event   AN NAJAF As Samāwah DHĪ QĀR Mosul   Saudi Arabia An Nāsirīyah  Average of 1 event per annum   NĪNAWÁ Arbil AL MUTHANNÁ Al Başrah AL BAŞRAH Umm Qasr 100 200 Miles  Average of  1 event per quarter   300 Kilometres Kuwait   As Sulaymānīyah  Average of 1 event per month   Kirkūk  Average of >2 events per month     KIRKŪK Syria   ŞALĀH AD DĪN   Samarra’ Iran DIYĀLÁ   Ba’qūbah Ar Ramadi Al Fallujāh BAGHDĀD   Baghdād Jordan   AL ĀNBAR Karbalā’ BĀBIL WĀSIT Al Kūt KARBALĀ Al Hillah   Ad Diwānīyah MAYSĀN An Najaf AL QĀDISĪYAH   Al ‘Amārah DHĪ QĀR   AN NAJAF As Samāwah Saudi Arabia An Nāsirīyah   Al Başrah AL BAŞRAH   AL MUTHANNÁ Umm Qasr   100 200 Miles   Kilometres Kuwait 100 200 300   Figure 3b: Iraq Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09 (with 5 year terrorism map inset top right)  Suicide terrorism  Suicide terrorism remains a major issue in Iraq, although the frequency of attacks has fallen sharply  since  Q4  2008.    In  2008/09  there  were  143  suicide  terrorism  incidents,  killing  1,193  and  injuring  3,360.  In the same period in 2007/08 there were 244 suicide terrorism incidents, killing  2,144 and  injuring 5,093 – significantly worse on all counts.    [TAKE ON TERROR]  7   
  • 14.     Elections 2010  On  7  March  2010  Iraqis  will  go  to  the  polls  to  elect  the  next  parliament  (Council  of  Representatives).  The elections, which were due in January 2010, were delayed due to a  political dispute about representation of minority Kurds and Sunnis.    In  the  run  up  to  the  elections  there  is  likely  to  be  a  continued  upswing  in  violence  perpetrated  by  those  who  would  like  to  derail  the  democratic  process  or  manipulate  its  outcome.    This  will continue to polling day.  Prime  Minister  Nouri  al‐Maliki  and  his  Shi’a‐dominated  government are running on a security platform, citing statistics showing falling violence.    Sunni  extremists  and  nationalists,  including  members  of  the  former  Ba’athist  regime  operating  from  Syria,  al‐Qa’ida  in  Iraq  (AQI),  and  Iranian‐backed  Shi’a  groups  all  have  reasons to wish to undermine the democratic process, destabilize Iraq and embarrass the  United States.    In August, October and December 2009 spectacular coordinated car bomb attacks were  staged in Baghdad killing hundreds.   Worryingly for the authorities, the bombings have  taken place in “secure areas” targeting among others government ministries.  This raises  doubts about the Iraqi security forces’ competence and loyalty and significantly damages  al‐Maliki’s  campaign.    It  also  puts  into  some  doubt  the  US  plan  to  withdraw  combat  troops  by  September  2010  as  it  will  be  difficult  for  President  Obama  to  claim  that  the  security situation is stable enough to warrant a withdrawal.  2010 will be a pivotal year for Iraq – definitely one to watch.    700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 July August September October November December January February March April May June 2008 2009 Incidents Dead Wounded Figure 3c: Iraq Suicide Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09   8  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 15.      [PAKISTAN]  The  deterioration  of  the  security  situation  in  Pakistan  has  been  swift  and  in  large  parts  of  the  country the government is not in full control.  Islamist militants in the Federally Administered Tribal  Areas are a serious problem.    3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Number Terrorist Incidents People Killed People Injured Hostages Taken   Figure 3d: Pakistan Terrorism Incidents (5 year trend)    In  2008/09  there  were  2,191  incidents  in  which  2,649  people  were  killed,  5,250  injured  and  4,060  people taken hostage or kidnapped.    Problem areas  All  along  the  border  with  Afghanistan,  in  North  West  Frontier  Province,  Federally  Administered  Tribal Areas and in many areas of Balochistan, there is large scale violence and insurrection.  This is  combined with a rising incidence of suicide terrorism in the country.     The  Waziristan  and  Baujur  districts  of  FATA  are  considered  to  be  the  most  significant  hubs  for  jihadis  along  the  border,  with  Baujur  reported  to  be  the  nexus  for  al‐Qa’ida–Taliban  activities  because of the many foreign militants reported to be in the area.  The area is used as a base to avoid  capture,  produce  propaganda,  as  a  hub  for  communications  with  cells  around  the  world  and  as  a  training area for new recruits.  However, sustained pressure on al‐Qa’ida in the FATA has led to the  deaths  of  several  key  personnel  in  the  past  year  weakening  the  organisation,  and  the  ongoing  conflict between the military and the militants has seen large numbers of civilian casualties.    North  West  Frontier  Province  suffered  the  most  recorded  terrorist  incidents  in  2008/09  ‐  1,213‐  accounting  for  over  half  the  incidents  in  Pakistan.    Particular  problem  areas  include  Swat,  Dera  Ismail Khan, Kohat, Peshawar, Bannu, Hangu, and Malakand.  [TAKE ON TERROR]  9   
  • 16.     Uzbek‐ Tajikistan Pakistan istan NORTH‐WEST China Baujur FRONTIER PROVINCE Turkmenistan Kābul Mohmand NORTHERN Khyber AREAS Peshawar NORTH‐WEST Kurram FEDERALLY FRONTIER ADMINISTERED PROVINCE Orakzai TRIBAL AREAS Peshawar Islamabad North Waziristan AZAD Rawalpindi KASHMIR South  Afghanistan Waziristan Lahore PUNJAB PUNJAB BALOCHISTAN Quetta BALOCHISTAN Iran India SINDH  No terrorist events    At least 1 event   Hyderabad  Average of 1 event per annum   Karachi  Average of  1 event per quarter   ARABIAN SEA 100 200 300  Average of 1 event per month   Miles Kilometres  Average of >2 events per month   100 200 300 Figure 3e: Pakistan Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09 (with breakout map of FATA top right)  Suicide terrorism  Suicide terrorism is a major issue in Pakistan and has been increasing since 2007.    600 500 400 300 200 100 0 July August September October November December January February March April May June 2008 2009 Incidents Dead Wounded Figure 3f: Pakistan Suicide Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09  In  2008/09  there  were  68  suicide  terrorism  incidents,  killing  956  and  injuring  2,653.    In  the  same  period last year there were 56 suicide terrorism incidents, killing 860 and injuring 1,994.  10  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 17.   International dimensions  Terrorism  and  terrorist  groups  operating  in  Pakistan  have  a  significant  impact  on  Pakistan’s  foreign relations.  For instance:  In recent months relations with India have been under strain as India accused Pakistan of  failing to cooperate with them in relation to the major attack in Mumbai which took place  in November 2008 and was perpetrated by Pakistani nationals.    A number of anti‐Indian groups operate in Kashmir and/or with suspected assistance from  the Pakistani military including: Lashkar‐e‐Taiba (LeT), the Jaish‐e‐Muhammad (JeM), and  the Harakat ul‐Mujahadeen (HuM).    Pakistan accuses India of supporting secessionist movements in Balochistan.  Security forces in Southern Afghanistan complain that the Taliban insurgency in Helmand,  Kandahar and Zabul is being supported from Balochistan.  It is thought that Mullah Omar  (if still alive) is living in Pakistan near Quetta. The US government is applying pressure on  the Pakistanis to crack down hard on Taliban forces within their territory.  Many analysts believe that Osama Bin Laden and his al‐Qa’ida affiliates are based in the  FATA.    It  is  also  thought  that  other  international  groups  operate  there,  including:    the  Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Islamic Jihad, the Libyan Islamic Fighters Group and the  Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement.  It  is  not  clear  whether  the  perpetrators  of  the  attack  on  the  Sri  Lankan  cricket  team  in  March 2009 were domestic Pakistani terrorists, possibly from Laskar‐e‐Taiba (LeT), or Sri  Lankans from the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE).     Aside from the international groups operating from within Pakistan, the country also has  home‐grown insurgencies to deal with.  The Pakistani Taliban or Tehrik‐i‐Taliban Pakistan  (TTP) is a response to military incursions into the FATA, while the Balochistan Liberation  Army is a secessionist movement.    Political instability  Security  will  continue  to  be  the  most  pressing  issue  facing  President  Zardari’s  government.      In  2009  the  Pakistani  military  launched  offensives  against  the  Pakistani  Taliban to regain territory in Swat (North West Frontier Province) which had slipped from  government  control.    The  government  has  also  tackled  the  TTP’s  stronghold  in  South  Waziristan.      The  military  offensives  are  the  latest  in  a  long  line  of  attempts  to  curb  militants in the north west of the country.   Note that the Pakistani state tends to target only those groups which present it with an  immediate domestic threat.  To that end many anti‐Indian or international groups are left  alone – so long as they do not develop a domestic agenda.  Why the selective approach?  It  is a function of scarce resources and the lack of inter‐agency cooperation.  There is only so  much the state can take on at one time.    Pakistan remains on a knife‐edge.         [TAKE ON TERROR]  11   
  • 18.     [AFGHANISTAN]  The  situation  in  Afghanistan  has  worsened  in  the  twelve  months  to  June  2009  in  the  build  up  to  elections  that  were  held  in  Q3  2009.    The  number  of  attacks  is up 27%.    In  2008/09, 2,321 people  were reported killed as a result of terrorist attacks, 3,556 were injured and 649 were taken hostage.  1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Number Terrorist Incidents People Killed People Injured Hostages Taken   Figure 3g: Afghanistan Terrorism Incidents (5 year trend)  Kandahar, Khowst, Ghazni, and Helmand all endured in excess of 100 attacks in 2008/09 – with 153,  139,136 and 109 incidents respectively.  Uzbek‐ Tajikistan Afghanistan istan PROVINCES China 1 KUNDUZ BĀDAKSHAN Mazār‐e TAKHĀR Turkmenistan Sharif 1 2 PĀRVAN 15 3 WARDAK 4 LOWGAR FĀRYĀB SAR‐ 11 5 PAKTĪĀ E‐POL 12 6 KĀBOL 13 BĀDGHĪS 7 7 KĀPĪSĀ Herāt BĀMĪĀN 2 9 8 8 LAGHMĀN Kābul 3 6 10  No terrorist events   9 KONAR HERĀT GHOR 4 DAYKONDI 10 NANGAHAR 5 14  At least 1 event   11 SAMANGĀN  Average of 1 event per annum   12 PANJSHĪR ORŪZGĀN FARĀH 13 NŪRESTĀN ZĀBUL  Average of  1 event per quarter   14 KHOWST  Average of 1 event per month   15 JOWZJĀN Lashkar Gāh KANDAHĀR  Average of >2 events per month   Iran NĪMRŪZ HELMAND India 100 200 300 Miles Kilometres Pakistan 100 200 300   Figure 3h: Afghanistan Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09   12  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 19.   Suicide terrorism  Suicide terrorism is a major issue in Afghanistan and has been increasing since 2005.  In 2008/09  there  were  107  suicide  terrorism  incidents,  killing  491  and  injuring  1,233.    In  the  same  period  in  2007/08 there were 102 suicide terrorism incidents, killing 653 and injuring 1,022 – broadly similar.    350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 July August September October November December January February March April May June 2008 2009 Incidents Dead Wounded   Figure 3i Afghanistan Suicide Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09  America’s bleak options  President  Obama  announced a  new  troop surge  in  Afghanistan  in December  2009.    The  surge  will  see America’s  deployment  peaking at  over 100,000 troops in July  2010 before  being reduced in the second half of 2011.    The US is potentially caught in Afghanistan.  There are few signs that efforts to train the  Afghan National Army or police, or to improve governance is bearing fruit ‐ yet.  And there  is concern that by putting a target date for commencement of withdrawal the US is giving  encouragement to the Taliban and other forces which threaten the Kabul administration –  which since the substantially flawed elections in 2009 has had its legitimacy demonstrably  undermined.  Many ordinary people will be looking to see which way the wind is blowing  so that when America leaves they are not seen to have been supporting the wrong side.  It  will  be  difficult  for  America  to  leave  Afghanistan  on  the  current  projected  timeline.   Unless there is a breakthrough to reduce the upward violent trend, America will be faced  with two options in 2011: withdraw as planned and lose face, while simultaneously leaving  America  at  increased  risk  of  another  9/11;  or  stay  and  risk  another  Vietnam  or  Korea.   Tellingly President Hamid Karzai, following his election win in November 2009, declared  that he hoped that Afghan forces would be in a position to start taking over from NATO  troops  within  three  years,  and  being  self‐sufficient  across  the  country  by  2015  allowing  foreign troops to begin to withdraw – four years later than presently envisaged.    The  effectiveness  of  the  troop  surge  and  the  success  of  similar  endeavours  across  the  border in Pakistan will be all important.   [TAKE ON TERROR]  13   
  • 20.     [ISRAEL]  The situation in Israel has improved significantlyin 2008/09 with attacks down from 1,173 to 802.  20  people were killed during the year with 484 injured and no hostages taken.    1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Number Terrorist Incidents People Killed People Injured Hostages Taken   Figure 3j: Israel Terrorism Incidents (5 year trend)  While the current situation is quiet ‐ the last major spike in terrorist activity took place in 2001, 2002  and 2003 when 204, 451 and 210 people were killed in each year respectively ‐ history tells us that  there are peaks and troughs in the security situation.  Until fundamental questions are resolved in  the region, the situation is likely to remain volatile with potential for upswings in violence.   140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Sep Jul Jul Jul Jul Jul Jul Jul Jul Jul Mar Mar Mar Mar Mar Mar Mar Mar Mar Mar Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan May May May May May May May May May May 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009   Figure 3k: Israel Terrorism ‐ Fatalities (by month since 2000) *  * Data from Wm. Robert Johnston  14  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 21.   NORTHERN (HaZafon) Israel DISTRICT Syria HAIFA (Hefa) DISTRICT CENTRAL (HaMerkaz) DISTRICT MEDITERRANEAN TEL AVIV West SEA DISTRICT Bank JERUSALEM (Yerushalayim) DISTRICT Jerusalem Gaza SOUTHERN  (HaDarom)  No terrorist events     DISTRICT Jordan  At least 1 event   Egypt  Average of 1 event per annum    Average of  1 event per quarter    Average of 1 event per month    Average of >2 events per month   100 Miles Kilometres 100 200 Saudi Arabia   Figure 3l: Israel Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09   Suicide terrorism  Suicide  terrorism  has  not  been  a  major  issue  in  Israel  in  2008/09.    There  have  been  no  recorded  successful terrorist attacks.  In the same period in 2007/08 there were 2 suicide terrorism incidents,  killing 1 and injuring 40.  As recently as 2005/06 there were 6 incidents, killing 27 and injuring 319.   While the recent incidence has been low, the threat remains.   Stalled peace process  The  Israeli‐Palestinian  peace  process  has  been  stalling  for  a  number  of  years.    The  Palestinians are divided and increasingly view the two state solution as unattractive for a  number  of  rational  reasons  (lack  of  resources,  favourable  demographic  trends,  strong  external  support  and  the  availability  of  cheap  weapons).    The  Israelis  are  distracted  by  Iranian  pursuit  of  nuclear  weapons  and  so  too  the  US  is  distracted  by  other  regional  concerns.  The two sides cannot agree on settlements, Jerusalem or Palestinian refugees.   Hopes  are  now  turning  to  improving  relations  between  Israel  and  Syria  as  a  means  to  unblock the  wider process,  but  progress will  not be achieved  without considerable input  from the United States.  Issues on the table relate to the status of the Golan Heights in the  far  north  east  and  water  access  rights.    The  question  is,  will  the  Obama  administration  take this on in 2010 with so much else on the agenda?  [TAKE ON TERROR]  15   
  • 22.     [INDIA]  The number of attacks in India is down slightly: during 2008/09 there were 692 attacks, compared  to 818 in 2007/08.  Nonetheless, the attacks killed 998 and injured 2,030.  921 hostages were taken.    1,800 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Number Terrorist Incidents People Killed People Injured Hostages Taken Figure 3m: India Terrorism Incidents (5 year trend)  Perhaps the most infamous attack in India during 2008/09 was the much publicised attack in  Mumbai in Q4 2008 which is detailed in the box overleaf.   200 STATE OR  India Miles UNION TERRITORY Kilometres JAMMU & KASHMIR 200 400 1 Punjab 2 Himachal Pradesh 2 China 3 Haryana 1 4 Delhi Pakistan 14 5 5 Uttarakhand 3 Bhutan 6 Sikkim 4 7 NEW DELHI 6 7 8 Arunachal Pradesh Assam UTTAR RAJASTAN 8 9 Meghalaya PRADESH 10 BIHAR 9 10 Nagaland 11 11 Manipur 13 12 12 Mizoram GUJARAT WEST MADHYA PRADESH BENGAL 13 Tripura 16 16 Kolkata State Myanmar 14 Chandigarh ORISSA (Culcutta) 15 MAHARASHTRA (Burma) 15 Dadra & Nagar Haveli 16 Daman & Diu Mumbai Bangladesh 17 Puducherry Hyderabad ARABIAN ANDHRA 17 SEA PRADESH GOA BAY OF BENGAL  No terrorist events   Chennai (Madras) 17 17  At least 1 event   TAMIL 17 NADU ANDAMAN AND  Average of 1 event per annum   LAKSHADWEEP NICOBAR ISLANDS  Average of  1 event per quarter   Sri  Average of 1 event per month   Lanka Maldives INDIAN OCEAN  Average of >2 events per month     Figure 3n: India Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09  16  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 23.   Trouble spots  Much  of  the  violence  throughout  the  country,  with  the  exception  of  Jammu  and  Kashmir,  is  perpetrated  by  various  extreme  left  /  Maoist  groups.    Violence  has  become  less  dispersed  throughout the country but remains a credible threat in most areas.  Islamist incidents such as the  Mumbai  attack  are  not  common  across  the  country,  they  are  mainly  confined  to  Jammu  and  Kashmir,  but  one  of  the  lessons  from  Mumbai  is  that  “spectaculars”  can  happen  anywhere.      The  numbers killed in the far north east, particularly in Manipur and Assam, are very high.      Suicide terrorism  Suicide terrorism has a not been a major issue for India lately.  There were no recorded successful  suicide  terrorist  attacks  in  2008/09  (the  Mumbai  attacks  are  not  considered  to  be  suicide  attacks  because the perpetrators did not intend to die).  The most recent suicide attacks took place in 2005  (two incidents) one in 2004.  The combined death toll of these attacks was 19, and 70 people were  injured.  Mumbai massacre  The  most  notable  incident  in  2008/09  was  the  attack  in  Mumbai  which  left  145  civilians,  17  police  officers  and  2  military  personnel  dead  and  a  further  280  civilians,  3  police,  25  military  personnel  wounded through a series of coordinated attacks.    While the attack is believed to have been perpetrated by Lashkar‐e‐ Taiba (LeT) – a Pakistan‐based militant group – it is not certain that  this  is  the  case  as  Mujahadeen  claimed  responsibility.    The  attack  was  the  worst  in  the  city  since  the  1993  bombings  which  left  250  dead  and  700  injured  in  a  series  of  13  bomb  explosions.    10  young  men  carried  out  the  attacks.    With  the  exception  of  Mohammed  Ajmal  Kasab  –  allegedly  pictured  left  –  all  were killed.  The trial of Kasab continues as at December 2009.  •  On 23 November the 10 attackers hijacked a fishing trawler off Mumbai, killing 5 crew   •  Three days later, on 26 November from about 21:20 local time, the men split up and  commenced a series of attacks  •  Two men targeted a main railway terminus with AK‐47 rifles killing freely  •  A popular restaurant, the Leopold Cafe, was attacked by gunmen  •  Two IEDs on timers were detonated in two taxis in the city killing several  •  Two  of  the  city’s  most  popular  hotels,  the  Trident  Oberoi  and  Taj  Mahal  were  attacked.  Several grenade explosions were reported (6 at the Taj and 1 at the Oberoi),  multiple shootings occurred.  Civilians and elected representatives were caught up in  the assaults.  The hotels were finally cleared by Indian special forces on 29 November  •  Nariman House, a Jewish cultural centre was attacked by gunmen who took multiple  hostages.    The  attack  ended  when  special  forces  stormed  the  complex  on  29  November  [TAKE ON TERROR]  17   
  • 24.     [RUSSIA]  The number of terrorist attacks in Russia increased to 483 from 330 year on year.  In 2008/09, 255  people were killed, 530 were injured and 21 taken hostage.  Incidents occurred predominantly in the  Caucasian Republics of Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingushetia spilling over into neighbouring areas.     1,000 900 800   700 600   500 400   300 200 100   0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4   2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009   Number Terrorist Incidents People Killed People Injured Hostages Taken Figure 3o: Russia Terrorism Incidents (5 year trend)  Suicide terrorism  Suicide terrorism remains an ongoing issue in Russia but this tactic is less prevalent than in some  other territories ‐ there have been 17 incidents since 2004. Most notable among these was the  attack at Beslan in September 2004 which resulted in the deaths of 186 children, 124 civilians, 11  teachers, 10 soldiers and 2 other government officials (see the spike in Figure 3o ‐ above ‐ in Q3  2004).  In 2008/09 there have been 5 suicide terrorism incidents, killing 19 and injuring 65.  60   50   40   30   20   10 0   July August September October November December January February March April May June 2008 2009   Incidents Dead Wounded Figure 3p Russia Suicide Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09  18  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 25.   500 Russia Miles Kilometres 1,000 60 ARCTIC OCEAN MAGADANSKAYA OBLAST 23 St. Petersburg 59 ARKHANGEL’SKAYA 30 OBLAST [62] 40 KRASNOYARSKIY  KRAI 34 Moscow KHABAROVSKIY KRAI 54 SAKHA 50 46 56 32 27 KOMI 20 24 58 22 [64] 49 52 38 PERMSKIY  29 42 33 26 KRAI 31 12 11 19 48 4 15 [61] 43 55 39 51 14 47 45 44 AMURSKAYA 53 2 TOMSKAYA 16 OBLAST ZABAYKAL’SKIY  41 21 OBLAST 37 28 1 36 IRKUTSKAYA 57 KRAI OBLAST PRIMORSKIY  17 8 35 9 18 25 KRAI 7 13 6 3 [63] 10 ALTAI  KRAI Japan 5 Kazakhstan ALTAY TYVA China Mongolia Republics Administrative Regions 1 Adygeya 18 Astrakhanskaya oblast’ 33 Nizhegorodskaya oblast’ 48 Tambovskaya oblast’ 2 Bashkortostan 19 Belgorodskaya oblast’ 34 Novgorodskaya oblast’ 49 Tul’skaya oblast’ 3 Chechenskaya 20 Bryanskaya oblast’ 35 Novosibirskaya oblast’ 50 Tverskaya oblast’ 4 Chuvashskaya 21 Chelabinskaya oblast’ 36 Omskaya oblast’ 51 Ul’yanovskaya oblast’ 5 Dagestan 22 Ivanovskaya oblast’ 37 Orenburgskaya oblast’ 52 Vladimirskaya oblast’ 6 Ingushetiya 23 Kaliningradskaya oblast’ 38 Orlovskaya oblast’ 53 Volgogradskaya oblast’ 7 Kabardino‐Balkarskaya 24 Kaluzhskaya oblast’ 39 Penzenskaya oblast’ 54 Volgodskaya oblast’ 8 Kalmykiya 25 Kemerovskaya oblast’ 40 Pskovskaya oblast’ 55 Voronezhskaya oblast’ 9 Karachayevo‐Cherkesskaya 26 Kirovskaya oblast’ 41 Rostovskaya oblast’ 56 Yaroslavskaya oblast’ 10 Khakasiya 27 Kostromskaya oblast’ 42 Ryazanskaya oblast’ 11 Mariy El 28 Kurganskaya oblast’ 43 Sakhalinskaya oblast’ Autonomous Districts 12 Morodoviya 29 Kurskaya oblast’ 44 Samarskaya oblast’ 60 Chukotskiy a.o. 13 North Ossetia‐Alania 30 Leningradskaya oblast’ 45 Saratovskaya oblast’ 61 Khanty‐Mansiyskiy a.o. 14 Tartarstan 31 Lipetskaya oblast’ 46 Smolenskskaya oblast’ 62 Nenetskiy a.o. 15 Udmurt 32 Moscovskaya oblast’ 47 Sverdlovskaya oblast’ 63 Ust’‐Ordynskiy Buryatskiy a.o. 64 Yamalo‐Nenetskiy a.o. Administrative Territories Autonomous Regions Autonomous Cities 16 57 Yevreyskaya avtonomnaya 58 Moskva Krasnodarskiy kray oblast’ 17 Stavrolpol’skiy kray 59 Sankt‐Peterburg Key The 5 Year Picture No terrorist events At least 1 event Average of 1 event per annum Average of 1 event per quarter Average of 1 event per month Average of >2 events per month Data  Main map is based on July 2008  to  June 2009 data, insert map on  January 2004 to June 2009.  QCIC’s  analysis is based on open source data  made available by US government.   Figure 3q: Russia Terrorism Incidents 2008‐09 (with 5 year trend inset bottom right)  [TAKE ON TERROR]  19   
  • 26.                                                   [TAKING ON TERROR]  20  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 27.   Globalisation and security risk management  The world is becoming smaller.  We are all travelling more and business is now globalised.  These  are established trends and will continue.  The Anglo‐Saxon world is becoming increasingly aware of risk.  Regulation and legislation, such as  the  recent  Corporate  Manslaughter  Act  (2008)  in  the  United  Kingdom,  is  increasingly  challenging  organisations  to  have  joined  up  and  effective  security  risk  management  functions.    That  is  not  to  say  that  security  risk  should  be  a  business  inhibiter  –  far  from  it  –  but  it  must  underpin  the  organisation’s activities and assure the Board and shareholders that all that can reasonably be done  to protect employees’ wellbeing and the organisation’s reputation is being done.  Yet,  as  consultants,  we  at  QCIC  continue  to  work  with  security  teams  which  are  organisationally  fragmented  or  buried  within  an  organisation  unable  to  fully  influence  the  organisation  as  they  might like.    In  the  21st  Century  business  world,  the  fragmented  security  function  of  the  20th  Century  is  outmoded and can potentially be dangerous.      Protecting physical assets  Buildings  and  plant  are  frequently  targeted  by  terrorists.    Some  locations  are  at  greater  risk  than  others, but there are numerous measures that can be put in place, either at the design stage of a  new build or retrospectively in the case of extant building stock, that can mitigate the effects of a  terror attack and help prevent one occurring in the first place.  Undertaking a Threat and Vulnerability Review is the first step.  Is the building or asset at risk?  To  what  extent  is  the  building  or  plant  vulnerable  given  the  present  level  of  threat  and  the  modus  operandii of terrorists who might pose a threat in the area?  Working with security and terrorism risk  experts is important to ensure that the risk assessment is thorough and current.    If measures are recommended to meet the latest safety standards or to provide the required level of  assurance,  working  with  security  engineers  such  as  QCIC  is  the  best  way  to  proceed  initially.      A  security engineer can advise you on the different products available on the market and can ensure  that  whatever  the  situation,  an  appropriate  scheme  is  developed  balancing  safety  and  other  organisational imperatives such as cost.  Protecting people  For  many  organisations  their  people  are  their  most  important  assets.    Employee  wellbeing  and  health  and  safety  is  afforded  increasing  value  and  this  should  spill  over  into  the  security  arena  –  although it often does not.   When  employees  are  working  at  their  office  they  should  feel  safe.    Having  a  well  drilled  crisis  management plan which includes how to deal with a terrorist incident (e.g. through ‘invacuation’) is  vital.    Knowing  that  you  have  in  place  the  appropriate  building  security  design  features  such  as  refuge areas, particularly in glass‐clad buildings is important.  Flying glass accounts for the majority  of injuries in a city bomb blast.    [TAKE ON TERROR]  21   
  • 28.   Having security grab bags in the office can also make a significant difference and are being strongly  recommended  by  Counter  Terrorism  professionals  in  the  United  Kingdom.    You  would  not  fail  to  equip an office with fire extinguishers, nor would you travel on an aircraft or boat that was not fitted  with safety features; so why would you not equip an office with security bags?  They are cheap and  cost effective.  With  business  travel  becoming  increasingly  normal,  it  is  imperative  that  your  employees  keep  on  top of the risks involved in travelling to unfamiliar locations – even if they have travelled there in the  past as things can change quite suddenly.  Often we find that off‐the‐shelf travel security solutions  are  not  effective  as  people  tend  not  to  read  security  briefings  prior  to  travel  and  go  outside  the  formal travel booking process to take advantage of deals from low cost carriers or to gain points.  It  is also vital that an organisation knows where its people are at any given time.  Off the shelf travel  tracking solutions  are  only  semi‐effective.    There  are other  products available  on  the  market  that  can offer better assurance.  Protecting reputation  One  of  the  tough  lessons  learnt  in  the  aftermath  of  9/11  was  that  some  companies  had  very  well  developed  security  risk  management  and  others  did  not.    Those  that  managed  the  disaster  well  emerged with an enhanced reputation, while others suffered immensely.     The best time to plan for a crisis is well in advance of it occurring.  Given that we cannot see into the  future, it is prudent to take action as soon as is practicable.  Do not assume that in the event of an  incident the police will take charge – your organisation will be but one of hundreds affected and the  police will have more pressing matters to attend to than your internal business crisis.  Protecting your business  Business  continuity  is  not  new.    But  many  companies  have  ill‐thought  through  plans.    It  must  be  remembered  that  if  there  is  a  disaster  close  by,  you  may  not  be  able  to  access  your  premises  for  some  time.    And  it  is  equally  important  to  remember  that  you  will  not  be  the  only  organisation  affected.    That  business  continuity  centre  you  are  subscribing  to  –  the  one  that  can  only  accommodate 3 or 4 companies simultaneously on a first come first served basis – may not provide  much of a safety net in the event of an incident in the heart of the City of London or Manhattan.  The value of getting expert advice  No one particularly likes using external consultants – particularly if you have an internal team.  But it  is  worth  remembering  that  external  experts  can  bring  fresh  eyes  to  your  organisational  situation.  They  can  independently  review  your  organisational  structures  in  light  of  your  risk  exposure,  your  culture  and  strategic  objectives.    They  can  work  with  you  to  identify  gaps  in  your  current  arrangements, highlight opportunities to use latest best practice and help to develop practical and  manageable  plans  to  move  your  organisation  to  a  more  resilient  future.  If  necessary,  consultants  can help develop a business case to achieve organisational support and funding.        22  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 29.     [TERRORISM RANKINGS]  The full ranking is shown in the table below.  Raw data is as supplied by the US Government and has  been analysed by QCIC.  Data relates to the year from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2009 (the most recent  period for which comprehensive data is available) and the preceding 12 months for comparison.    Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  1 Iraq  4,428  2,534  2 Pakistan  1,342  2,191  3 Afghanistan  1,103  1,403  4 Israel  1,173  802  5 India  818  692  6 Russia  330  483  7 Somalia  494  451  8 Thailand  771  448  9 Philippines  282  384  10 Colombia  366  303  11 Nepal  637  161  12 Congo, Democratic Republic  52  146  13 Greece  51  118  14 Algeria  72  67  15= Sri Lanka  95  64  15= West Bank  57  64  17 Sudan  46  58  18 Nigeria  68  53  19 Turkey  37  52  20 Gaza  142  47  21 Indonesia  14  44  22 Georgia  15  35  23= Spain  74  30  [TAKE ON TERROR]  23   
  • 30.   Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  23= Lebanon  43  30  25 Yemen  21  28  26 Iran  7  18  27 United Kingdom  16  15  28= France  50  14  28= Burundi  18  14  28= Bangladesh  17  14  31= Myanmar (Burma)  37  12  31= China  3  12  33 Chile  14  10  34 Ethiopia  5  9  35 Egypt  ‐  8  36 Venezuela  8  7  37= Kosovo  16  6  37= Peru  5  6  39= Serbia  15  5  39= Uganda  8  5  39= Bosnia & Herzegovina  3  5  39= Central African Republic  3  5  39= United States  3  5  44= Kenya  37  4  44= Niger  19  4  44= Mali  8  4  44= Rwanda  2  4  44= Zimbabwe  1  4  44= Syria  1  4  44= Germany   1  4  44= Azerbaijan  ‐  4  52= Bolivia   7    3   52= Ecuador   4    3   52= Macedonia   3    3   52= Mauritania   3    3   52= Tajikistan   3    3   24  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 31.   Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  52= Swaziland   ‐      3   58= Mexico   11    2   58= Senegal   6    2   58= Cyprus   2    2   58= Ukraine   1    2   58= Angola   1    2   58= Eritrea   1    2   58= Kyrgyzstan   1    2   58= Paraguay   1    2   58= Uzbekistan   ‐      2   67= Malaysia   4    1   67= Cameroon   2    1   67= Croatia   1    1   67= Montenegro   1    1   67= Albania   ‐      1   67= Saudi Arabia   ‐      1   67= Japan   ‐      1   67= Jordan   ‐      1   67= Belarus   ‐      1   67= El Salvador   ‐      1   67= Equatorial Guinea   ‐      1   67= Finland   ‐      1   67= Gambia, The   ‐      1   67= Honduras   ‐      1   67= Ireland   ‐      1   67= Latvia   ‐      1   67= Libya   ‐      1   67= Panama   ‐      1   67= Slovenia   ‐      1   67= Sweden   ‐      1   87= Guatemala   10    ‐     87= Bhutan   9    ‐     87= Chad   7    ‐     [TAKE ON TERROR]  25   
  • 32.   Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  87= Italy   2    ‐     87= Ghana   2    ‐     87= Morocco   2    ‐     87= South Africa   2    ‐     87= Liberia   2    ‐     87= Timor‐Leste   2    ‐     87= Cambodia   2    ‐     87= Jamaica   2    ‐     87= Maldives   2    ‐     87= Cote d'Ivoire   1    ‐     87= Switzerland   1    ‐     87= Armenia   1    ‐     87= Brazil   1    ‐     87= Hungary   1    ‐     87= Sierra Leone   1    ‐     87= Tanzania   1    ‐     87= Austria   1    ‐     87= Bahrain   1    ‐     87= Bulgaria   1    ‐     87= Burkina Faso   1    ‐     87= Kazakhstan   1    ‐     87= Namibia   1    ‐     87= Trinidad and Tobago   1    ‐     87= Tunisia   1    ‐     87= Madagascar   ‐      ‐     87= Canada   ‐      ‐     87= Lesotho   ‐      ‐     87= Moldova   ‐      ‐     87= New Zealand   ‐      ‐     87= Benin   ‐      ‐     87= Western Sahara   ‐      ‐     87= Andorra   ‐      ‐     87= Antigua and Barbuda   ‐      ‐     26  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 33.   Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  87= Argentina   ‐      ‐     87= Australia   ‐      ‐     87= Bahamas, The   ‐      ‐     87= Barbados   ‐      ‐     87= Belgium   ‐      ‐     87= Belize   ‐      ‐     87= Bermuda   ‐      ‐     87= Botswana   ‐      ‐     87= Brunei   ‐      ‐     87= Cape Verde   ‐      ‐     87= Cayman Islands   ‐      ‐     87= Comoros   ‐      ‐     87= Congo (Brazaville)   ‐      ‐     87= Costa Rica   ‐      ‐     87= Cuba   ‐      ‐     87= Czech Republic   ‐      ‐     87= Denmark   ‐      ‐     87= Djibouti   ‐      ‐     87= Dominica   ‐      ‐     87= Dominican Republic   ‐      ‐     87= Estonia   ‐      ‐     87= Fiji   ‐      ‐     87= Gabon   ‐      ‐     87= Grenada   ‐      ‐     87= Guinea   ‐      ‐     87= Guinea‐Bissau   ‐      ‐     87= Guyana   ‐      ‐     87= Haiti   ‐      ‐     87= Holy See   ‐      ‐     87= Iceland   ‐      ‐     87= Kiribati   ‐      ‐     87= North Korea   ‐      ‐     87= South Korea   ‐      ‐     [TAKE ON TERROR]  27   
  • 34.   Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  87= Kuwait   ‐      ‐     87= Laos   ‐      ‐     87= Liechtenstein   ‐      ‐     87= Lithuania   ‐      ‐     87= Luxembourg   ‐      ‐     87= Macao   ‐      ‐     87= Malawi   ‐      ‐     87= Malta   ‐      ‐     87= Marshall Islands   ‐      ‐     87= Mauritius   ‐      ‐     87= Micronesia   ‐      ‐     87= Monaco   ‐      ‐     87= Mongolia   ‐      ‐     87= Mozambique   ‐      ‐     87= Nauru   ‐      ‐     87= Netherlands   ‐      ‐     87= Netherlands Antilles   ‐      ‐     87= Nicaragua   ‐      ‐     87= Norway   ‐      ‐     87= Oman   ‐      ‐     87= Palau   ‐      ‐     87= Papua New Guinea   ‐      ‐     87= Poland   ‐      ‐     87= Portugal   ‐      ‐     87= Qatar   ‐      ‐     87= Romania   ‐      ‐     87= Saint Kitts and Nevis   ‐      ‐     87= Saint Lucia   ‐      ‐     87= Saint Vincent and the Grenadines   ‐      ‐     87= Samoa   ‐      ‐     87= San Marino   ‐      ‐     87= São Tomé and Principe   ‐      ‐     87= Seychelles   ‐      ‐     28  [TAKE ON TERROR]   
  • 35.   Number of Incidents  Rank  Territory  Trend  2007/08  2008/09  87= Singapore   ‐      ‐     87= Slovakia   ‐      ‐     87= Solomon Islands   ‐      ‐     87= Suriname   ‐      ‐     87= Taiwan   ‐      ‐     87= Togo   ‐      ‐     87= Tonga   ‐      ‐     87= Turkmenistan   ‐      ‐     87= Tuvalu   ‐      ‐     87= United Arab Emirates   ‐      ‐     87= Uruguay   ‐      ‐     87= Vanuatu   ‐      ‐     87= Viet Nam   ‐      ‐     87= Zambia   ‐      ‐               [TAKE ON TERROR]  29   
  • 36.                       [ABOUT QCIC]  QCIC is a leading and innovative security and political risk advisory firm. Headquartered in London,  the  company  offers  a  variety  of  integrated  security  and  risk  management  solutions,  including:  security  engineering,  travel  risk,  crisis  management  and  alert  systems,  business  intelligence  and  political risk services and solutions. Our client base is diverse and includes FTSE100 and Fortune 500  organisations and high net worth individuals who value quality of service and innovative approaches  that a smaller firm can offer.  QCIC Group  23 Berkeley Square  Mayfair  London W1J 6HE    Tel:   + 44 (0)* 207 060 7242  Fax:   + 44 (0)* 207 060 7243  Visit:   www.qcic‐group.com  Email:   enquiries@qcic‐group.com    * Please omit (0) if dialling from outside UK.    [TAKE ON TERROR]      

×