Beyond Friending: @cunycommons and the Emergence of the Social University

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A MITH Digital Dialogue
Tuesday, November 2, 12:30-1:45
MITH Conference Room, McKeldin Library B0135

“Beyond Friending: @cunycommons and the Emergence of the Social University” by Matthew K. Gold

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Beyond Friending: @cunycommons and the Emergence of the Social University

  1. 1. Beyond Friending: @cunycommons and the Emergence of the Social University MITH Digital Dialogue, 2 November 2010 Matthew K. Gold Assistant Professor of English, New York City College of Technology Interactive Technology and Pedagogy Program, CUNY Graduate Center http://mkgold.net @mkgold
  2. 2. The CUNY Academic Commons
  3. 3. The CUNY Academic Commons History, Strategy, Process, Use
  4. 4. The CUNY Academic Commons History, Strategy, Process, Use The Social University
  5. 5. The CUNY Academic Commons History, Strategy, Process, Use The Social University Opportunities, Barriers, Openings
  6. 6. The CUNY Academic Commons History, Strategy, Process, Use The Social University Opportunities, Barriers, Openings Building a Wider Commons
  7. 7. The CUNY Academic Commons History, Strategy, Process, Use The Social University Opportunities, Barriers, Openings Building a Wider Commons Communities, Publics, Possibilities
  8. 8. The CUNY Academic Commons
  9. 9. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members 243,000 degree-credit students 273,000 continuing and professional education students 47% of undergrads have a native language other than English 41% percent work more than 20 hours a week 63% attend school full time 15% support children. 60% percent female 29% are 25 or older. Of first-time freshmen: 37% are born outside the U.S. mainland 70% attended NYC public high schools source: cuny.edu
  10. 10. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members 243,000 degree-credit students 273,000 continuing and professional education students 47% of undergrads have a native language other than English 41% percent work more than 20 hours a week 63% attend school full time 15% support children. 60% percent female 29% are 25 or older. Of first-time freshmen: 37% are born outside the U.S. mainland 70% attended NYC public high schools source: cuny.edu
  11. 11. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members 243,000 degree-credit students 273,000 continuing and professional education students 47% of undergrads have a native language other than English 41% percent work more than 20 hours a week 63% attend school full time 15% support children. 60% percent female 29% are 25 or older. Of first-time freshmen: 37% are born outside the U.S. mainland 70% attended NYC public high schools source: cuny.edu
  12. 12. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members 243,000 degree-credit students 273,000 continuing and professional education students 47% of undergrads have a native language other than English 41% percent work more than 20 hours a week 63% attend school full time 15% support children. 60% percent female 29% are 25 or older. Of first-time freshmen: 37% are born outside the U.S. mainland 70% attended NYC public high schools source: cuny.edu
  13. 13. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members 243,000 degree-credit students 273,000 continuing and professional education students 47% of undergrads have a native language other than English 41% percent work more than 20 hours a week 63% attend school full time 15% support children. 60% percent female 29% are 25 or older. Of first-time freshmen: 37% are born outside the U.S. mainland 70% attended NYC public high schools source: cuny.edu
  14. 14. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members 243,000 degree-credit students 273,000 continuing and professional education students 47% of undergrads have a native language other than English 41% percent work more than 20 hours a week 63% attend school full time 15% support children. 60% percent female 29% are 25 or older. Of first-time freshmen: 37% are born outside the U.S. mainland 70% attended NYC public high schools source: cuny.edu
  15. 15. source: Newman Library, Baruch College http://newman.baruch.cuny.edu/digital/2001/history/book/chap_07/nyt_75_11_16.htm
  16. 16. CUNY is open source
  17. 17. The CUNY Academic Commons
  18. 18. The CUNY Academic Commons • What it is • Why we created it • What has worked • What hasn’t worked • How it’s changing the culture of the university
  19. 19. CUNY PIECUNY PIE DiFara’s!DiFara’s!
  20. 20. Administrative Need: an integrated university. a connected university.
  21. 21. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members source: cuny.edu
  22. 22. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members source: cuny.edu
  23. 23. City University of New York (CUNY) 23 Colleges 11 Senior Colleges 6 Community Colleges 6,700 Full-Time Faculty Members source: cuny.edu
  24. 24. a networked university.
  25. 25. 2006 2008 ???
  26. 26. Institutional Mandate Alexandra W. Logue Executive Vice Chancellor and University Provost George Otte University Director of Academic Technology
  27. 27. Institutional Structure CUNY Committee on Academic Technology (CAT) George Otte, Chair Two members from each CUNY campus Established September 2008
  28. 28. Charged with creating an “academic technology commons”
  29. 29. Faculty Need: University-sponsored open-source platforms.
  30. 30. source: MikeLeSombre http://is.gd/gAb9R
  31. 31. Faculty Need: New hires across CUNY ~ need for renewed institutional connections.
  32. 32. What we didn’t want
  33. 33. photo by FredR http://www.flickr.com/photos/fredr/262344284/ THE INSTITUTIONAL REPOSITORY
  34. 34. Photo by myguerrilla http://www.flickr.com/photos/myguerrilla/1303099901/ THE PERFECT TAXONOMY
  35. 35. Source: Abby flat-coat http://www.flickr.com/photos/22912005@N06/4104714854/ THE HARD SELL
  36. 36. Source: Medieval Helpdesk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQHX-SjgQvQ TRADITIONAL MODELS OF TECH SUPPORT
  37. 37. What we did want
  38. 38. Source: akashgoyal http://www.flickr.com/photos/a_goyal/2169624754/ OPEN
  39. 39. Source: bernat... http://www.flickr.com/photos/bernatcg/509261808/ ORGANIC
  40. 40. Source: jbushnell http://www.flickr.com/photos/jbushnell/569748609/ DECENTERED
  41. 41. Source: jcn http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcn/4568432782/ OPEN SOURCE
  42. 42. Outreach strategies, or, The Commons and Its Publics
  43. 43. rough prototypes
  44. 44. word of mouth
  45. 45. tech savvy
  46. 46. D I Y
  47. 47. engaging open-source communities
  48. 48. “we judge our tools by one key metric above all others: use. Successful tools are tools that are used. “ Tom Scheinfeldt “Lessons from One Week | One Tool – Part 2, Use.” Found History. 2 August 2010. <http://www.foundhistory.org/ 2010/08/02/lessons-from-one-week-one-tool-part-2-use/> “
  49. 49. 39,632 downloads* * as of 2 November 2010
  50. 50. use cases
  51. 51. SERENDIPITY
  52. 52. The SOCIAL University
  53. 53. CRISIS
  54. 54. GAHHHHHHHH HHHHHHH!!!!!
  55. 55. The Academy and Its Publics
  56. 56. “Dare to be reductive.” Gerald Graff, Clueless in Academe (2003)
  57. 57. “Dare to be public.” Matthew K. Gold, “Beyond Friending.” MITH Digital Dialogue (2010)
  58. 58. The converted ?
  59. 59. Hey! we’re all on twitter!
  60. 60. Challenges
  61. 61. Challenges interaction fatigue
  62. 62. Why should our institutions be our frame? Challenges
  63. 63. a few principles
  64. 64. Build recursive publics
  65. 65. Build recursive publics “Free Software . . . is not simply a technical pursuit but also the creation of a ‘public,’ a collective that asserts itself as a check on other constituted forms of power—like states, the church, and corporations—but which remains independent of these domains of power. Free Software is a response to this reorientation that has resulted in a novel form of democratic political action, a means by which publics can be created and maintained in forms not at all familiar to us from the past. Free Software is a public of a particular kind: a recursive public. Recursive publics are publics concerned with the ability to build, control, modify, and maintain the infrastructure that allows them to come into being in the first place and which, in turn, constitutes their everyday practical commitments and the identities of the participants as creative and autonomous individuals.” – Christopher Kelty, Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software (2008)
  66. 66. Build generative communities
  67. 67. Build generative communities “Generativity is a system’s capacity to produce unanticipated change through unfiltered contributions from broad and varied audiences. . . . Generativity pairs an input consisting of unfiltered contributions from diverse people and groups, who may or may not be working in concert, with the output of unanticipated change.” – Jonathan Zittrain, The Future of the Internet - And How to Stop It (2008)
  68. 68. Blog your process
  69. 69. Share your work

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