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Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5
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Nikkei Smart Cities Forum Final Oct 5

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This is the presentation on smarter energy delivered to the Japanese Delegation in Austin (Nikkei)

This is the presentation on smarter energy delivered to the Japanese Delegation in Austin (Nikkei)

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  • Through the three dimensions of ‘smart’—INSTRUMENTED, INTERCONNECTED, INTELLIGENT--intelligence is being infused into the way the world and cities works. Making cities more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent isn't only about overcoming the challenges they face. It also recognizes that cities provide us with some of the greatest opportunities for making the planet smarter, too. Cities symbolize and centralize so many aspects of what will make for a smarter planet: smarter education, smarter healthcare, smarter water and energy use, smarter public safety, smarter transportation, and smarter government ... to name but a few. Becoming smarter is leading to new savings and efficiencies, and equally important, new possibilities for programs and sustainability of our cities.
  • Sources http://www.dmic.co.in/ http://www.assocham.org/docs/DMIC-GUJARAT-NEW.pdf http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2009-12-29/news/27636833_1_project-development-fund-development-of-eco-cities-delhi-mumbai-industrial-corridor http://www.hindu.com/2011/02/16/stories/2011021666452000.htm http://www.ilfsindia.com/downloads/bus_rep/DMIC_brief.pdf http://www.businessstandard.com/india/news/sanand-to-get-%5Ccommunity-smart%5Cdmic/421717/ http://indolinkenglish.wordpress.com/2010/05/05/top-japanese-cos-ink-pact-with-state-govts-dmic/
  • Sources http://www.babcockranchflorida.com/pdf/205-5-6-06.pdf http://www.globalecoinnovation.org/docs/Babcock_Ranch_Overview.pdf http://www.dep.state.fl.us/lands/FFAnnual/Removed%20Projects/Babcock%20Ranch.pdf http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/31827.wss http://dirt.asla.org/2011/02/24/will-the-eco-cities-of-the-near-future-be-livable/
  • Enemalta and Water Services Corporations Building a smarter energy and water system BUSINESS CHALLENGE: On the Mediterranean island of Malta, power and water are intricately linked. The nation’s electricity is generated entirely by imported fossil fuel, while the country depends on electrically powered desalination plants for over half of its water supply. In fact, about 75% of the cost of water from these plants on Malta is directly related to energy production. Meanwhile, rising sea levels threaten Malta’s underground freshwater source. This presents a complex, interconnected series of challenges that require immediate attention to ensure that the country delivers affordable, secure energy while protecting the environment. In addition, to meet this challenge, both Enemalta and Water Services Corporations are undergoing an internal transformation process geared towards increased efficiency. SOLUTION: Maltese national power and water utilities — Enemalta and Water Services Corporation — are partnering with IBM to help their country become the first in the world to build a nationwide smart grid and a fully integrated electricity and water system. This system will be able to identify water leaks and electricity losses in the grid, allowing the utilities to more intelligently plan their investments in the network and reduce inefficiency. 250,000 interactive meters will monitor electricity usage in real time, set variable rates, and reward customers who consume less energy and water. Thousands of intelligent sensors will be deployed along transmission lines, substations, and other existing infrastructure to manage electricity distribution more efficiently and to anticipate problems. The project is the first step in establishing an end-to-end electricity and water smart utility system. When complete, the multi-phased engagement is expected to completely transform the relationship between Maltese consumers and utilities suppliers, while enabling more efficient consumption of energy and water. In assisting in the transformation of both utilities, IBM is entrusted to implement a customer relationship management (CRM) & Billing solution, as well as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) core modules, while a new web portal will be instilled for both utilities to better interact with their end customers. To fund the needed projects, IBM Research partnered with GBS and the government of Malta and applied their expertise in securing European Union funding and committed to a two-year agreement to assist the government and people of Malta. The Research/GBS team conducted workshops, provided software and helped to develop internships that help Malta citizens learn project fundamentals and then move on to other projects in other countries. IBM Research is providing data analytics and other research expertise for energy and utilities, education, “smart city” initiatives and telecommunications projects. BENEFITS - All of the data from the intelligent meters can be collected and analyzed to help lower costs, adopt efficient and sustainable consumption patterns and cut greenhouse gas emissions. - By addressing the issues of water and power as a system, the Maltese government can provide citizens with better information to make smarter decisions about how and when they use power — and the country can begin the task of replacing carbonintensive fuel oil with renewable energy for the future. Other Benefits include: Actual use: Estimated accounts will be eliminated, and customers will pay only for what they actually use. Flexible tariffs: Utility companies will be able to manage different prices to sustain new policies on energy consumption. Pre-payment: The solution allows customers to switch to a pre-pay service, similar to mobile phone pre-payment. Reduction of losses: Commercial losses will be reduced and technical losses will be more easily identified through monitoring of electricity and water grids. Remote management of electricity supply: No local intervention will be needed to activate, reduce, increase or terminate supply, thereby reducing connection time. Energy efficiency: The system will enable sophisticated analysis of consumption patterns, enabling a real-time view of energy use to identify opportunities for reduction. Customer portal: Customers will have an Internet window to their technical and commercial data, to track current consumption and choose the most appropriate agreements. Usage level : Win/Ongoing project/Completed project: External Ongoing project Industry : Energy & Utilities
  • A European national power system Reduces costs and carbon emissions by optimizing its power supply strategy The Need: Like all power utility operators around the world, the European national agency must constantly manage a daunting challenge: power must be consumed as it is generated because it cannot be stored. Demand, however, fluctuates significantly and is influenced by many variables—such as available generating capacity and other costs and restrictions over a given time period. In fact, the process of finding available sources of power at the lowest cost at any given time, called “unit commitment,” requires complex mathematical equations to accommodate the large number of variables.   Until recently, the agency calculated its unit commitment using a homegrown solution. But, to comply with mandates of the Kyoto Protocol, it needed a more robust and flexible application that could accommodate the addition of alternative energy sources and the increasing number of energy systems coming online. The Solution: To help the agency optimize its power supply strategy, IBM built a new tool for calculating unit commitment. Giving the client much more flexibility to address varying needs and complex variables, the new tool provides an integrated development environment for building and maintaining the unit commitment model. Planners can now easily compare different power generation scenarios, programs and production costs. And the tool has made it easier for operations personnel to participate during model development and interact during the solution search to influence outcomes.   The new tool was built with IBM ILOG optimization technology, including IBM ILOG CPLEX, IBM ILOG Optimization Decision Manager and IBM ILOG OPL Development Studio software.   What Makes It Smarter: Decreases production costs by one to two percent, a savings of between €50,000 and €100,000 per day, by accommodating complex variables in supply Lowers carbon emissions by 2.5 percent, a savings of approximately 100,000 tons of carbon dioxide annually, by optimizing supply across a network of traditional and alternative energy generators Encourages use of wind-generated energy by integrating alternative energy sources into the power supply optimization strategy Reduces use of generators at night by approximately 50 percent, which also helps reduce noise pollution near power generating plants Usage level : Win/Ongoing project/Completed project: External [not provided] Industry : Energy & Utilities
  • Through the three dimensions of ‘smart’—INSTRUMENTED, INTERCONNECTED, INTELLIGENT--intelligence is being infused into the way the world and cities works. Making cities more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent isn't only about overcoming the challenges they face. It also recognizes that cities provide us with some of the greatest opportunities for making the planet smarter, too. Cities symbolize and centralize so many aspects of what will make for a smarter planet: smarter education, smarter healthcare, smarter water and energy use, smarter public safety, smarter transportation, and smarter government ... to name but a few. Becoming smarter is leading to new savings and efficiencies, and equally important, new possibilities for programs and sustainability of our cities.
  • We want to show you an illustrativ e utility and what their benefit picture looks like – just to give you an idea of the quantification that is possible using the model we ’ve built. This illustration is from a vertically-integrated utility with more than 2 million customers, operating in a mature energy market. This utility ’s ANNUAL benefit (once they’ve made the full investment journey) is over $600 million each year. We’ve assumed they invest over an 8 year time period and work their way through the journey as we described it on the previous page. The largest benefit is in T&D capital expense. For this utility, fully 1/3 of their benefit comes from their ability to keep up with demand and reliability through voltage/VAR optimization, distribution automation and better asset management while postponing investments in the grid. Now, investments can ’t be deferred forever -- for this utility, the deferral period is 5 years based on their growth curve (depending on your demand growth, your deferral period may be shorter or longer). The monetary value of this deferral is just the carrying cost of the capital expenditure – we know that this utility will eventually need to make these investments if the demand curve continues as projected, so we have not taken any benefits around the equipment itself. But even with this conservative approach, the utility is able to save $195 million each year. The next largest benefit this utility would achieve is on the environmental side, where this utility has a monetary incentive that encourages them to lower CO2 emissions. If you do not have such a monetary incentive, the model will calculate the emissions reduction anyway. This is information that may be of keen interest to your regulators, even without monetary incentives. Generation capital expenses for this utility are calculated in a similar fashion and driven by the same types of investments as the T&D CapEx benefits. Though for this utility, the percentage of benefit is not as large on the generation side, it is enough to seriously defer additional peaking plants and the expense that goes along with them. They are able to more accurately project capacity needs so they are in a much better position to target their capital investment in areas where it is sorely needed. In addition, this utility is able to realize additional Operating and Maintenance benefits by substituting automation for field trips and improving maintenance and call center activities. Smart metering reduces the number of field trips for turn on/turn offs by 90% while outage calls to the call center are shortened by 10%. Resources can be directed to other activities or eliminated. Lastly, energy costs can also be reduced by identifying theft and controlling line losses – in this illustration, 7% of the yearly benefit. The analytic capabilities and smart meters enable significantly better and faster identification of unusual patterns and unexplained commercial losses, while voltage/VAR optimization reduces line loss. For this utility – operating in a mature market – energy cost reduction is still a significant benefit. Utilities with high incidence of theft will see greater returns here.
  • Through the three dimensions of ‘smart’—INSTRUMENTED, INTERCONNECTED, INTELLIGENT--intelligence is being infused into the way the world and cities works. Making cities more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent isn't only about overcoming the challenges they face. It also recognizes that cities provide us with some of the greatest opportunities for making the planet smarter, too. Cities symbolize and centralize so many aspects of what will make for a smarter planet: smarter education, smarter healthcare, smarter water and energy use, smarter public safety, smarter transportation, and smarter government ... to name but a few. Becoming smarter is leading to new savings and efficiencies, and equally important, new possibilities for programs and sustainability of our cities.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Building Smart Cities A global view Matt Futch Global Policy Lead, IBM Energy & Utilities
    • 2. Presentation Outline
      • Major Evolution in Electric Power Sector
      • Global Smart Grid deployment comparison
      • Smart City Design and Deployment projects
      • Universal challenges, unique solutions
      • Key global partnerships to consider
      • The top five platform areas of engagement
      IBM Confidential Smart Grid Adoption: Drivers & Challenges - An assessment for UK, Germany, France & Australia Nov 22, 2011
    • 3. Coal/Natural Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric UTILITY TRADITIONAL The energy and utilities value chain needs to evolve THE INTELLIGENT UTILITY NETWORK Coal/Natural Gas Consumer Power Flow Periodic Information Flow Continuous Information Flow Solar Energy Storage Wind Nuclear Energy Storage Hydroelectric Solar UTILITY Solar Wind Plug-in Vehicle Energy Storage Wind
    • 4. Our world is becoming INSTRUMENTED Our world is becoming INTERCONNECTED Virtually all things, processes, and ways of working are becoming INTELLIGENT Intelligence is being infused into the way the world works
    • 5. With new capabilities to redefine the relationship between utilities and end-users enabling new business models Participatory Network A wide variety of grid and network technology evolve to enable shared responsibility, and consumers’ strong interest in specific goals creates new markets (virtual and physical) and new product demands, which balances benefits more equally between the consumers and utilities CONSUMERS UTILITIES Take advantage of variable pricing by purchasing electricity when it’s cheapest. Generate their own electricity and sell it back to the grid. Decrease carbon emissions by choosing clean electricity sources. Automatically monitor the health of the grid. Remotely sense damage to grid assets and dispatch repair crews. Better predict demand and manage supply accordingly.
    • 6. Globally, countries have different goals and regulatory environments IBM Confidential Smart Grid: Country Perspectives - An assesment for USA, China, Australia, Germany, France and UK Nov 22, 2011 Sources: MD&I Analysis,
      • USA
      • No centralized national level mandate. Each state has independent legislations, consequentially some are moving faster than others in smart grid implementation
      • States have their own renewable energy and energy efficiency targets.
      • Germany
      • No clear national level mandate for smart meter roll out. However smart meters have been made mandatory in new buildings and renovations
      • Federal government is strongly committed to renewables. The National Renewables Action Plan estimates the share of RES in gross final energy consumption to be 19.6% by 2020.
      • China
      • State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC) has laid out a three phase roadmap for smart grid roll out by 2020.
      • Government has set a target to achieve 15 percent of energy demand from Renewable Energy Sources (RES) and reducing the carbon intensity of it’s economy by 40 to 45 percent from a 2005 baseline by 2020.
      • France
      • Mandatory by law to roll out smart meters covering 95% of residential and 100% of commercial & industrial customers by 2016 has been set. 35 million smart meters are expected to be installed
      • EU obligation of generating 23% of its electricity from RES by 2020 up 13% as compared to 2005 level
      • Australia
      • The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) has committed to a mandated roll-out of smart meters where it can be demonstrated that benefits outweigh costs
      • The states of Victoria (by 2013) and New South Wales (by 2017) have mandated smart meter deployments to customers consuming less than 160Mwh per annum
      • Other states have been relatively slower in their progress towards smart meter deployment
      • UK
      • The country has more or less clear mandate for installation of 47 million smart meters, including both electricity & gas, by 2020.
      • Aggressive target under EU renewable energy directive to produce 20% of energy from Renewable Energy Sources (RES) by 2020 as against 1.3% in 2005
    • 7. China, Australia and USA have made relatively more progress in terms of smart grid planning and piloting China Is likely to move ahead with wide scale deployment of mature smart grid technologies. USA Some states are likely to move ahead of others, however deployment activity on wider scale is not likely over next two years UK Over next two years smart grid piloting activity is likely to pick up but wide scale roll out unlikely France Nation wide smart meter roll-out imminent, however deployment of other smart grid technologies is expected to be slow Germany Wide scale deployment of smart grid technologies is not likely to begin until 2013 Australia Victoria and NSW moving ahead with smart meter rollouts, however other states lagging behind Relative assessment of smart grid market stage in key countries NOTE: A country placed higher along the chart indicates that it has made relatively more progress in terms of its smart grid plans and vision, however it shouldn't be interpreted as higher degree of market maturity as the smart grid vision of each of these countries is different Time Planning and Piloting Phase Deployment Phase Innovation Phase
    • 8. INDIA - Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor
      • Energy-conservation
      • Reducing carbon emission s
      • Next-generation urban infrastructure
      • Electric transportation systems
      City Development Areas Feb 2011 HIGH MED DELHI-MUMBAI INDUSTRY CORRIDOR CRTICAL INVESTMENTS PRIMARY FOCUS Key spend areas City gov’t priority Remarks Urban development eco-cities will follow the Japanese model of using industrial wastes as raw materials for other industries to create a zero emission environment Infrastructure Smart community projects as a energy-conserving, emitting low-carbon and using next-gen urban transportation systems Transportation (Freight) Dedicated freight corridor to transport goods along the most important business centers and the port cities in Gujarat Goals
      • Mega infra-structure project of USD 90 billion with the financial & technical aids from Japan, covering an overall length of 1483 KMs between Delhi and Mumbai.
      • This corridor will be equipped with an array of infrastructure facilities such as power facilities, rail connectivity to ports en route etc.
      • Approximately 180 million people, 14 percent of the population, will be affected by the corridor’s development.
      Influencers Gujarat Infrastructure Devpt.. Board, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, DMIC Apex Steering Authority Schedule/ spend plan
      • An estimated $90 to $100 billion would be required to create the infrastructure in the first phase of the project. Japanese companies are expected to invest over $10 billion in the proposed corridor during the first phase.
      • Schedule: 2006-18
      Potential partners Mitsubishi, Nikken Sekkei and IBM Japan have joined hands with 3 state governments to develop eco-friendly infrastructure High Low Key:
    • 9. FLORIDA - Babcock Ranch Development Profile City Development Areas Feb 2011 LOW HIGH Babcock Ranch – Development summary Critical Investments PRIMARY FOCUS
      • Smart Grid and Intelligence
      • Renewable Energy
      • Efficiency through urban design
      • Reduced dependence on vehicles
      Key spend areas City gov’t priority Remarks Smart Grid Real-time monitoring and remote programming of every outlet in the house or office alows high-load appliances to operate in off-peak hours when rates are lower Renewable energy An array of solar panels positioned on 400 acres of sun-drenched land and atop numerous commercial buildings throughout the city.   Communication Kitson & Partners have joined forces with IBM to drive the convergence of physical and digital technologies necessary Urban Planning Parks, trails, wellness and fitness centers will be integrated into the city’s urban scape Goals
      • South-west Florida’s city of tomorrow which aims to build a sustainable, environmentally sensitive, green community to new heights
      • Babcock Ranch is the first city planned to be powered by the sun, with the majority of its electric needs generated from the largest on-site solar photovoltaic energy facility powering any city on earth.
      Influencers Kitson & Partners, State govt. of Florida, Lee County Schedule/ spend plan
      • Schedule
      • 2005-16
      • Spend plan:
      • $310 mn (govt of Florida investment)
      • $2bn for the solar city project by FPL
      Potential partners Babcock Ranch Mgmt LLC, Florida Power and Light (FPL) High Low Key:
    • 10. Enemalta and Water Services Corporations Building a smarter energy and water system.
      • Business challenge
      • On the island nation of Malta, electricity is generated entirely by imported fossil fuel, and electrically powered desalination plants provide over half its water supply. Meanwhile, rising sea levels threaten Malta’s underground freshwater source. This complex series of challenges required immediate attention to ensure that the country delivers affordable, secure energy while protecting the environment. In addition, to meet this challenge, both Enemalta and Water Services Corporations are undergoing an internal transformation process geared towards increased efficiency.
      • Solution
      • The Maltese national power and water utilities are partnering with IBM to help their country become the first in the world to build a nationwide smart grid and a fully integrated electricity and water system. 250,000 interactive meters will monitor electricity usage in real time, set variable rates, and reward customers who consume less energy and water. Furthermore, in assisting in the transformation of both utilities, IBM is entrusted to implement a customer relationship management (CRM) and Billing solution, as well as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) core modules, while a new Web portal will be instilled for both utilities to better interact with their end customers.
      • Benefits
        • Data from the intelligent meters can be analyzed to help lower costs, adopt efficient and sustainable consumption patterns and cut greenhouse gas emissions
        • By addressing water and power issues as a system citizens can make smarter decisions about how and when they use power
    • 11. SPAIN: Red Electrica de Espana Reduces costs and carbon emissions by optimizing its power supply strategy.
      • The need
      • European national power system meets fluctuating demand by calculating the lowest-cost energy available at any given time. To comply with mandates of the Kyoto Protocol, utility management agency needed a more robust and flexible application for making these calculations, one that could accommodate the addition of multiple alternative energy sources as well as the increasing number of energy systems coming online .
      • Solution
      • IBM provided training and the client built a new tool for optimizing unit commitment—the process of finding and dispatching power sources at the lowest possible cost—which gives the agency the flexibility it needs to address complex variables. With an integrated development environment at its core, the tool allows planners to easily compare power generation scenarios, programs and production costs and then select the optimal demand coverage at any given time .
      • What makes it smarter
        • Decreases production costs by one to two percent, a savings of between €50,000 and €100,000 per day, by accommodating complex variables in supply
        • Lowers carbon emissions by 2.5 percent, a savings of approximately 100,000 tons of carbon dioxide annually, by optimizing supply across a network of traditional and alternative energy generators
        • Encourages use of wind-generated energy by integrating alternative energy sources into the power supply optimization strategy
    • 12. Infrastructure is expensive so we must show RETURN ON INVESTMENT Consumers must support it but need a clear VALUE PROPOSITION Utilities/Regulators being pushed but need new BUSINESS RISK MODEL To build an intelligent grid there are major challenges and potential solutions
    • 13. Demonstrate return on investment Benefits by area for an illustrative utility More than two million customers $ 605 Million 32% 23% 27% 7% 11% *Note: The annual benefit at Year 10 (steady state) for this illustrative utility is $605 million $605 Million* T&D O&M Costs Reducing T&D O&M costs for maintenance, metering, field operations, restoration and call center activities Generation CapEx T&D CapEx Reducing Generation and T&D capital investment through better asset management, voltage/VAR optimization, distribution automation and capacity forecasting Energy Costs Reduced energy cost by controlling line losses and identifying theft and other commercial losses Environmental Reducing emissions through automated operations, lower energy consumption and reduced line losses
    • 14. Bad news = 40% did not know meaning of $kWh Good news = knowledge increases support for Smart Grid
    • 15. Speed of technology change RATE CASE REFORM Revenue erosion from reduced sales ENERGY SERVICES MODEL Resource planning focused on supply-side IRP GRID ASSETS Regulatory and Business Structures must evolve along with speed of technology, a monumental challenge
    • 16.  
    • 17. Annual Meeting - Campinas
    • 18. Sao Paolo, Brazil Queanbeyan, Australia New Delhi, India San Diego, CA USA Houston, TX USA Raleigh, NC USA Washington, DC USA Copenhagen, Denmark Paris, France The Global Intelligent Utility Network Coalition: advancing smart grid progress for over 150 million consumers around the world Dallas, TX USA Arnhem, The Netherlands Seoul, South Korea Tokyo, Japan
    • 19. The GIUNC was formed by IBM in response to client interest in understanding how other utilities were working through the challenge of smart grid transformation Coalition Focus Knowledge Transfer Joint Development Influence the Marketplace
      • The mission of the coalition is to shape, accelerate, and share in the development of the Intelligent Utility Network (IUN) or smart grid
      • The Coalition’s purpose is to collaborate on best practices, work together to influence the market, and jointly develop to progress the industry
      • The Coalition is currently comprised of 13 members from 9 countries , representing over 150 million consumers worldwide
      • A key benefit of the coalition is it reduces regulatory, financial, market and implementation risk for both coalition members and IBM
      • The organization is built through IBM’s strategic partnerships with member clients.
      About
    • 20. 3 Societal and Environmental Technology Information, engineering, integration of information and operational technology, standards, and business analytics tools Conservation and green initiatives, sustainability, economics and ability to integrate alternative and distributed energy People and Technology Domains Strategy, Management and Regulatory Organization Vision, planning, decision making, strategy execution and discipline, regulatory, investment process . Communications, culture, structure Work and Asset Management Grid Operations Value Chain Integration Customer Management and Experience Optimizing the assets and resources (people and equipment) Advanced grid observability & advanced grid control, quality and reliability Enabling demand and supply management, distributed generation, load management, leveraging market opportunities Retail, customer care, pricing options and control, advanced services and visibility into utilization quality, and performance Process Domains 1 2 4 7 5 6 8 The Global IUN Coalition developed the Smart Grid Maturity Model to be used as a blueprint for smart infrastructure transformation
    • 21.
    • 22.
      • The Global Smart Grid Federation was established in April 2010 to bring together Smart Grid initiatives from around the world. Over the past several years, various countries have initiated projects and programs to explore the potential of the new generation of information- and communication-based technologies emerging across the power sector. 
      • The Global Smart Grid Federation was formed to:
      • Facilitate the collaboration from around the world to conduct and foster research in the application of Smart Grid technologies
      • Support rapid implementation of Smart Grid technologies by establishing itself as the global center for competency on Smart Grid technologies and policy issues
      • Foster the international exchange of ideas and best practices on energy issues, including reliability, efficiency, security, and climate change
      • Create avenues for dialogue and cooperation between the public and private sectors in countries around the world on issues relating to the deployment of Smart Grid technologies.
      The Global Smart Grid Federation
    • 23. The five tiers to building a strong smart grid platform Develop a Consumer Education Plan Early Adopt or Establish Interoperability Standards Create Regulatory & Financial Incentives for Investments Establish Clear and Robust Data Privacy and Security rules Create Long Term Roadmap with Articulated Objectives
    • 24. ありがとう * شكرا * 謝謝 * Merci * Danke * शुक्रिया * תודה * terima kasih * با تشکر از شما Thank you * gracias * tack * آپ کا شکریہ * σας ευχαριστώ * спасибо * gratias agimus tibi Matt Futch, Global Policy Lead IBM Energy & Utilities [email_address] 303-638-9412

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