The What, Why & How of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP)
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The What, Why & How of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP)

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Presented at the Essential Design event at the State Library of Queensland in Brisbane Australia on 22nd of September 2013......

Presented at the Essential Design event at the State Library of Queensland in Brisbane Australia on 22nd of September 2013
http://www.southbank.qm.qld.gov.au/Events+and+Exhibitions/Events/2013/09/Essential+Design+The+Essentials

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  • 1. The What, Why & How of the Minimum Viable Product (MVP) Presented by Ben Maden
  • 2. What is an MVP?
  • 3. SOMETHING SIMPLE
  • 4. “Everything should be as simple as it can be, but not simpler...” Albert Einstein, 1950 How a "Difficult" Composer Got That Way by Roger Sessions via quote investigator
  • 5. “... I try to only put into each work as much of myself as possible” Albert Einstein, 1950 How a "Difficult" Composer Got That Way by Roger Sessions via quote investigator
  • 6. How simple can it be? Consider these two things...
  • 7. Supply & Demand
  • 8. The Holy Grail - Make Something Desirable
  • 9. Supply What skills and resources do you have? What skills and resources do you need? What do you want to build?
  • 10. Supply What skills and resources do you have? What skills and resources do you need? What do you want to build?
  • 11. Demand What does the market want? What does the user need? How appealing can your MVP be?
  • 12. Ask your market... What does the market want? What does the user need? Consider the appeal of your MVP Ear Icon by Dirk Unger from The Noun Project
  • 13. Beware... Prioritise Wants Needs Market 2 1 A User 4 3
  • 14. Beware... Prioritise Skull & Cross Bones by Jens Tärning from The Noun Project Wants Needs Market 2 1 A User 3
  • 15. How do you ask a Market? Ask many users and be aware of wants vs needs and you can get an insight into the demand.
  • 16. How do you ask a Market? Ask many users and be aware of wants vs needs and you can get an insight into the demand.
  • 17. How do you ask a Market? Ask many users and be aware of wants vs needs and you can get an insight into the demand. You can also ask Google.
  • 18. But I’m doing something special that internet peeps don’ t understand...
  • 19. But I’m doing something special that internet peeps don’ t understand... 1. The users don’t need to understand your “special” thing here 2. You need to find and understand their wants and needs
  • 20. 3. Internet peeps are real people. 82.3%* of Australia’s Population are Online 4. and that’s 2012 data and we’ve all got way more ipads and smart phones online now * Australian Population Internet Use is 82.3% according to Wikipedia citing UN data
  • 21. How? Type a Need or Want into Google.... DON’T PRESS ENTER I heard this at Mozcon 2012 Wil Reynolds of SEER Interactive. Excellent Blog Post by Hoa Cong.
  • 22. 5. We’re doing something special too, get specific...
  • 23. 5. We’re doing something special too, get specific... Excellent You Tube video here by Michael Palin - The Minstry of Foods Expand on this with who, what, where, when, why and how
  • 24. Demand When you’ve got input about wants and needs consider importance and marketing potential... Basic Discriminator Energizer Positive Non-negotiable Differentiator Exciter Neutral Tolerable Dissatisfier Enrager Negative So what? Parallel The Entrepreneurial Mindset by Rita Gunther McGrath, Ian C. MacMillan, p71
  • 25. Supply What skills and resources do you have? What skills and resources do you need? What do you want to build? What is the most important part(s) of an MVP? Remember this?
  • 26. Give me an M
  • 27. Give me a V
  • 28. What, no P?
  • 29. If you focus on the Product and what you want... You *will* over-engineer it. It won’t be an MVP. What if... you under engineer it?
  • 30. Under-engineered Product? You will disappoint some customers until it can be delivered. Use this to your advantage. A impossible B unlikely C probable D likely E often Trivial Low Medium Inconvenient Minor Serious Dangerous High Extreme
  • 31. Cultural Dimensions Transparency and openness can be an huge marketing opportunity. Are you an underdog? Share your story. Cultural Dimensions by The Hofstede Centre http://geert-hofstede.com/australia.html Magnifying Glass Icon by John Caserta from The Noun Project
  • 32. Emotions and personalities build trust - Start a Blog
  • 33. Build Trust - Be REAL Use any short-fall in your product to improve, evolve AND include your users to build a community. Examples https://getsatisfaction.com/ http://moz.com/community Twitter search for #RCS
  • 34. MVP Tips 1. Market Wants and Needs - use Google 2. “Minimum Viable” - don’t over-engineer 3. Get it shipped 4. Be Transparent - Tell your Story 5. Fix issues fast - Develop the product Magnifying Glass Icon by John Caserta from The Noun Project
  • 35. Questions? Download the slides here.... http://bit.ly/130922mvp Ben Maden, Director of Matter Solutions Twitter @bmaden ben@mattersolutions.com.au
  • 36. Credits Coconuts Photo Mark Turnauckas on Flickr Creative Commons Ear Icon http://thenounproject.com/ungerdirk Skull & Cross Bones Jens Tärning, from The Noun Project Rope: Royalty Fee Stock Photo bought from ShutterStock.com
  • 37. Bonus Slides The Classic Mistake
  • 38. The Classic MVP Mistake Huge Product, won’t sell Fix: Cut it hard and cut it deep
  • 39. “None shall pass” - No one buys a confusing product
  • 40. Begin the process of removing features
  • 41. “Only a flesh wound” - Cut more away, get to the core
  • 42. Cut back until you have something simple to market
  • 43. Take care to cut out the extraneous bits, not more
  • 44. Down to an MVP - Get on with marketing and selling
  • 45. Get out there, tell your story