• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
The Middle Ages
 

The Middle Ages

on

  • 2,824 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,824
Views on SlideShare
2,824
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    The Middle Ages The Middle Ages Presentation Transcript

    • The Middle Ages
    • The Franks
      • The Conversion of Clovis (426)
      • Carolingian dynasty (751)
      • Charles Martel and the Battle of Tours (732)
      • Charlemagne ascends the throne (768)
    • Charlemagne
      • Administration of the realm
      • Holy Roman Emperor (800)
      • Aachen and the Carolingian Renaissance
      • Alcun, the palace school, and the Seven Liberal Arts
      • Carolingian miniscule
      • Treaty of Verdun (843)
    • Alfred the Great
      • The Danes
      • Alfred the Great and Wessex
      • The Danelaw and the Danegeld
      • The translation program
      • Shires, writs, and the Witan
    • Characteristics of the East
      • Money economy
      • Urbanism
      • Bureaucratic states
      • Lay literacy
      • Civil superiority over religious life
    • Early Byzantine Society
      • 395 Final division of the Empire
      • Justinian (527-565) and reconquest of the West
      • Corpus Iuris Civilis and codification
      • Ravenna and mosaic art
      • The Iconoclastic Controversy
    • Later Byzantine Society
      • Conversion of Kievan Rus
      • Conflict with Islam
      • Legacies of Byzantium
        • Maintenance of Roman social structure
        • Caesaro-papism
        • Preservation of classical Greece
        • Hagia Sophia
    • Early Islamic Civilization
      • Birth of Muhammad (570)
      • The Hijrah – Islamic Year One (622)
      • Conquest of Mecca (630)
      • Death of Muhammad (632)
      • Conquest of Palestine, Syria, and Persia (630s and 40s)
      • Invasion of Spain (712 )
      • Defeated at Constantinople (717 )
      • Defeated in France (732)
    • Islam: a Primer
      • Creed: shahada – “ There is no God but God, and Muhammad is his prophet”
      • Cult: Five Pillars of the Faith – Shahad, Daily prayer, Hajj, Sadaqa, Fasting during Ramadan
      • Community: contemptuous toleration of older monotheisms
    • Accomplishments of Islamic Civilization
      • Baghdad and Islamic culture
      • Intellectual achievements of the Islamic world
      • Trade and the Mediterranean
    • Medieval Society
      • The three Orders (Estates)
        • Oratores (the clergy)
        • Bellatores (the nobility)
        • Laboratores (the peasantry)
      • Major social organizations
        • Catholicism
        • Feudalism
        • Manorialism
    • Manorial Agriculture
      • The Manor
      • Serf-lord relationship
      • Nucleated villages and communal life
      • Agricultural practice
      • The cross plow system
      • Non-human resources
      • Crop rotation
    • Feudalism
      • Pre-conditions of feudal order
      • Vassal-lord relationship
      • Investiture and the fief
      • Subinfeudation and the feudal monarchy
    • Catholicism
      • The Hierarchy
      • Regular and secular clergy
      • The Catholic Consensus
        • Church as a source of divine truth
        • Intercessory prayer
        • Eucharist and Real Presence
        • Sacraments as conveyors of grace
    • Church Controversy and Reform
      • Cluny (founded 910)
      • Clerical marriage
      • Simony and pluralism
      • The Investiture Controversy: Pope Gregory VII vs. Emperor Henry IV
      • The Concordat of Worms (1122)
    • 12 th Century Creativity
      • Carthusians
      • Cistercians
      • Convents: Ursulines, Beguines, etc.
      • Hybrid orders: Templars, Hospitallers, and Canons
      • Heresy: Waldensians and Albigensians
      • Innocent III and the 4 th Lateran Council
    • Early Feudal Monarchies
      • The Case of Germany and Italy
      • Iberia and the Reconquista
      • France: accretion
        • The Capetian dynasty and the Ile de France
        • Phillip II and the Angevins
      • England: the feudal revolution
        • William of Normandy and the Battle of Hastings (1066)
        • The Domesday Book
        • Common Law
    • Feudal Monarchies Mature
      • Codification
      • Assemblies of Estates
      • England in Crisis: King John
        • The Magna Carta (1215)
        • Edward I and the Parliament
      • France
        • The Estates-General
        • Phillip IV and clerical expropriation
      • Spain
        • Aragon and Castile
        • Cortes
    •  
    • Summary
      • The Middle Ages in many ways represented a kind of “Primeval Europe.” During this era, the foundations of a distinctively European society were laid in the shadows of the ruins of Rome. The social order rested upon functional distinctions that stressed natural obedience, hierarchy, and tradition. Each person was appointed a place in a “Great Chain of Being” that stretched from God to the lowliest pauper. Meanwhile, the classical tradition continued in the East, albeit in new forms under the Byzantine and Islamic Empires.