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The Birth of Nationalism

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    The Birth of Nationalism The Birth of Nationalism Presentation Transcript

    • The Birth of Nationalism
    • The French Revolution
      • The Constitutional Phase: 1789-1792
      • The Radical Phase: 1793-4
        • The Terror
        • Citizen Genet
      • The Directory: 1795-9
      • The First Empire: 1800-1815
    • President Adams
      • Election of 1796
      • Federalist Retrenchment
      • “ Above faction”
      • Divided government
    • War and the State
      • The XYZ Affair and the Quasi-War
      • Alien and Sedition Acts
      • The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions
      • Convention of 1800
    • The First Party System
      • Voter participation and property restrictions
      • Jefferson/Madison vs. Hamilton
      • The “Revolution” of 1800
      • The partisan press
      • Rituals of political culture
      • Lyon vs. Griswold – political animosity
    • Federalists
      • Centers of geographic strength: NE and Mid-Atlantic
      • Demographic and Economic Bases: urban, mercantile, export-based farmers
      • Commercial centralism
      • Pro-British
    • Republicans
      • Centers of geographic strength: South, West, and Middle states
      • Demographic and Economic Bases: most farmers, planters, immigrant workers
      • Agrarian individualism
      • Pro-French
    • Jeffersonian Democracy
      • “ We are all Republicans; we are all Federalists”
      • The virtue of simplicity: a trope of American politics
      • Early systems of patronage
    • The New Slavery
      • Gabriel’s Rebellion
      • Eli Whitney and the cotton gin
      • Cessation of the Slave Trade
      • Towards the West
    • Marshall and the Court
      • Midnight Judges and John Marshall
      • Judicial federalism
      • Marbury v. Madison – judicial review
      • Dartmouth v. Woodward
      • McCulloch v. Maryland
    • Government on the Cheap
      • Albert Gallatin, Sec. of the Treasury
      • Internal taxation
      • Demilitarization
      • Reduction of the federal bureaucracy
    • The Louisiana Purchase
      • New Orleans and the Mississippi
      • Napoleon’s dreams
      • Black Jacobins – the Haitian Revolt
      • Lewis and Clark
    • Jefferson’s Embargo
      • The Orders in Council and the Continental System
      • Impressment
      • Chesapeake Incident
      • Embargo and Non-Intercourse
      • Neutral Rights
    • The War Hawks
      • John C. Calhoun
      • Henry Clay
      • Expansionism and the agrarian interest
      • The Northern Prize
      • More East-West turmoil
    • Madison and the War of 1812
      • The invasion of Canada
      • The Great Lakes theatre
      • Sack of Washington, D.C.
      • Battle of New Orleans
    • “ A common and equal right in the land…”
      • Indian Trade and Intercourse Acts
      • “ agriculture… manufactures… civilization”
      • Tecumseh
      • Battle of Horseshoe Bend
      • First Seminole War
    • The Collapse of Federalism
      • Hartford Convention and New England secession
      • “ The Era of Good Feelings”
      • The 1816 Election
    • The Virginia Dynasty
      • James Monroe
      • Consensus nationalism
      • Tariffs and banks
      • The Missouri Compromise
    • The Monroe Doctrine
      • Bolivar and Latin American Independence
      • 1823 State of the Union Address
      • Moral opposition to colonialism
      • Hostility of Western Hemisphere wars
      • Britain: liberalism and naval enforcement
      • Towards American colonialism
    • Summary
      • The new republic weathered the storms of international turmoil brought about by the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and emerged from them with a newly minted spirit of nationalism.
      • The first party system institutionalized the process of legitimate dissent and established a pattern for the rest of American history in diffusing and limiting political unrest.
      • The apparent “Era of Good Feelings,” though, concealed bitter divisions within the nationa over issues like slavery, economic policy, and treatment of the Indians that would characterize the following decades.