Using Wordpress 2009 04 29

3,289 views
3,197 views

Published on

These are the slides from a free workshop I gave of April 29, 2009 on using wordpress to manage your website. For more information visit http://downeastlearning.org/

Published in: Technology, Design
1 Comment
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,289
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
30
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
83
Comments
1
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Using Wordpress 2009 04 29

  1. 1. Downeast Learning Cooperative  Matthew Baya 
  2. 2. SECTION I – INTRODUCTIONS    This section has the following information:     About this class    Who is presenting?    Who is organizing this? 
  3. 3. About this Class     “Using wordpress to manage your website”  was created after a number of people asked  the presenter about how to use & best  leverage wordpress for their websites.    This is a ‘rush’ intro, you wont leave this class  knowing how to do everything, but we’ll point  you in the right direction and help you get  going.    Followup class? If there is demand for more, a  followup presentation could be arranged. 
  4. 4. Matthew Baya    Lifelong computer geek.    BS Computer Science, Antioch College 1992    Unix SysAdmin at The Jackson Laboratory    Manager of Svaha LLC    President of Downeast Mac Users Group –  http://demug.org/    E‐mail: matt@baya.net    Personal Blog ‐ http://matt.baya.net/ 
  5. 5. Svaha LLC  <plug>    Web Hosting, Design & Consulting since 1995    Svaha LLC provides internet consulting and design  services for artists, small businesses and non‐profit &  community focused organizations. We enable our clients  to focus on their projects and goals while we focus on the  technology behind the curtain.     We host hundreds of websites, including many in this area.     http://Svaha.Com/  </plug> 
  6. 6. Downeast Learning Cooperative     Purpose is to enable its members, who are interested in  technology, both digital and mechanical, to learn from  one another and share what they have learned with the  wider public.     This is the third presentation in a series by Coop  members that will continue over the coming months.     http://downeastlearning.org/ ‐ Go sign up!    Links to this presentation and other content  shared here will be on this site. 
  7. 7. SECTION II – BACKGROUND INFO    This section includes a REALLY quick  overview of :    computers    the internet    websites    web servers    networks.    Other geeky terms 
  8. 8. Definitions    Starting simple and getting more complex.  Not trying to insult anyone but it’s important  we’re using the same vocabulary so when we  start getting more complex you can  (hopefully) follow me    Peeling the Onion   Hopefully tear free 
  9. 9. Computer  For purposes of this presentation it's any device  capable of receiving input and transmitting  output of information.   Personal Computer, iPhone, Cell Phone etc. 
  10. 10. Network    A communication medium that allows computers to  transmit and receive data from each other.     Wired    Wireless 
  11. 11. Internet  A network of networks. 
  12. 12. More definitions    Client / Viewer/User – A human @ a 'computer’ (PC,  Mac, tivo, wii, iphone, blackberry, cell phone)  connected to the internet.  Web Site – A collection of data available by request.    Text, images, video, audio, etc.  Web Server ‐ A computer dedicated to serving up    files from a website to a client.  Web Host ‐ Company that manages one or more web    servers  Download – Retrieving files from another computer    Upload – Sending files to another computer.   
  13. 13. Yet More Definitions    HTML – Hyper Text Markup Language    Using only text it encodes the content (data) and the  formatting (design) so that they can be displayed by a …    Web Browser     Software that runs on a computer that can request files  from websites hosted on a webserver. It then translates the  HTML and displays text and graphics together.  Firefox    Internet Explorer (IE)    Safari     iphone, blackberry, cell phones    Wii, xBox, webTV    
  14. 14. HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language)  <html>   <head>     <title>This is the page title</title>   </head>   <body>     The body of the message.   </body>  </html> 
  15. 15. So what happens when…    Someone views a web page    A Client downloads a web page    A client connected to the internet that is  running a web browser application  downloads the text (HTML formatted) and  images associated web page from a web  server that is managed by a web host. 
  16. 16. The World Wide Web in Plain English    Videos in ‘Pla makes ‘in Plain English’ videos  http://commoncraft.com/ 
  17. 17. (My name is) URL    URL – Universal Resource Locator    A way to reference an address for specific web  page.    Used when linking    Protocol     http, ftp, rtsp, itts?(itunes)    http://domain‐name.TLD/    Gets more specific from left to right 
  18. 18. What’s in a (domain) name?    TLD – Top Level Domain    .com, .net, .org, .biz, .info, .me    New ones all the time 
  19. 19. URL Syntax    http://subdomain.domain.TLD/foldername/ filename.suffix&variable=value    Filename Suffix & Variables    .txt    .html    .php    .asp    Variables ‐ &otherinfo=walrus&A=B&C=… 
  20. 20. IP address – What’s your #?    IP = Internet Protocol    IP address – Every “computer” on a network  needs an IP address.    xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx – where xxx = 001‐256    Would be pretty tedious memorizing  numbers.     Oh wait, we already do that for phones!    But why not make it easier?     Since we’re on a network we can have a way to  associate a “Domain Name” with an IP address. 
  21. 21. DNS (Domain Name System)      Basically a big list of domain names & IP  addresses.     So when you type in a domain it knows where  to go. 
  22. 22. DNS “Tree” 
  23. 23. DNS continued    Distributed    Root Servers – On the internet    Name Servers – At your web server/host    DNS Cache – On your local client     What is my IP ?  http://whatismyip.com/ 
  24. 24. Domain Name – Why get one?    why ‐ (find old presentation?)    ‐ branding ‐ You want people to remember  your website    ‐ Mobility ‐ Analogy to phone number having  phone company name in the number    ‐ Centralization ‐    ‐ Control ‐ 
  25. 25. Domain Name – How do I get one?    Registrar – Cheap (~$8) to expensive ($35+).  Some TLD’s (.tv) cost more.    All they do is point DNS to your host    Difference? Value added services in addition,  but base service the same.    Domain Redirect    E‐mail Redirect    Hosting packaged with    Privacy Protect 
  26. 26. TLD (Top Level Domain)    .com / .net / .org / .biz / .info / .me     .com still most popular.     Not enforced:    .org for non‐profits    .net for networks, like ISPs etc.    Only ones that are policed;    .edu – for higher ed (though some secondary)    .coop – for officially registered coops    .tel – brand new. Like a directory 
  27. 27. More definitions    Open source software (OSS) ‐ is defined as  computer software for which the source code  and copyright are provided under a software  license that permits users to use, change, and  improve the software, and to redistribute it in  modified or unmodified forms. It is very often  developed in a public, collaborative manner.  
  28. 28. Free vs commercial    Commercial – Hire a select few experts, they do  all the coding & testing.    Pros – Tight control over changes. Support    Cons ‐ $$$    Open Source Community – Anyone can  participate and suggest changes. Entire  community (websites, lists, etc) focused on each  product. Learning from each other. Evolving to  meet the needs on the fly.    Pros – Free. Quick updates. Part of something    Cons – Sometimes lack of support. Docs/training only  online.  
  29. 29. Open Source Software we’re using    Linux OS (CentOS, Red Hat, BSD)    Programming languages    PHP    Perl    Ruby On Rails    MySQL‐ Database. Think of an Excel  spreadsheet that’s searchable/sortable.    Apache httpd – Web Server software 
  30. 30. Old Web Publishing model      Create HTML on local machine.    Save.    Upload (FTP)    Load via web browser. Note problems    Change code locally.     Save.    Upload.    Repeat 
  31. 31. Static HTML website       User requests a page    Server finds that HTML file    Send file to user’s browser. 
  32. 32. More old model html problems    Static content. Every link, image, header,  footer are all fixed.    Everytime you make a change you have re‐ upload.    So if you had your phone number on every  page, you’d have to edit all of them to  update.    Not searchable. Not dynamic.  
  33. 33. Server Side Applications    Paradigm Shift ‐ This isn't your father's  website  Not just static text files, it’s a program    running that is serving up data it’s pulling  from a database.  Content (data) is separate from design     Cake vs Icing    Dynamic. Searchable. Interactive.   
  34. 34. Server Side Example    User requests a page    Server queries database    Database returns results    Application converts data to HTML    Automatically adds sitewide footer/header/etc.    Sends HTML to user’s browser 
  35. 35. Large Remote Apps examples    These are private custom applications    Facebook, Myspace, friendster, livejournal,  linkedin  Blogger, wordpress.com ‐ Blogs    flickr ‐ photos    youtube – video    Twitter    
  36. 36. Installable Server Applications    Forums / Bulletin Boards – Discussion boards  ‐ phpBB, punBB, SMF    Photos – Gallery of Thumbnails ‐ Gallery2,  Coppermine    Blogs – Moveable Type, Wordpress (more  later  ) 
  37. 37. Content Management Systems (CMS)    Large website management tool     Multi‐author    Content organized by topic, date, etc.     Searchable    Some static content, some dynamic    Customizable:    Themes – Designs    Plugins/Modules – Adds new features. 
  38. 38. CMS Options    Commercial     Lots of choices, I’m no expert on this front.     Some custom from places like Sephone     Free  Drupal    Joomla    Mambo    Plone    Help manage online communities where users    have logins, interact with each other. 
  39. 39. Blog – What?   
  40. 40. What is Wordpress?    Blog publishing tool   For posting lots of entries     Views organized by topic, date, etc.     Searchable    Multi‐author      Static pages and dynamic content    Customizable:    Themes    Plugins    Wait… déjà vu! 
  41. 41. Wordpress.org vs wordpress.com    Wordpress.org – Has downloadable script  (application) that you can install on your  account on a webhost.    Wordpress.com ‐ lets you get started with a  new and free WordPress‐based blog in  seconds, but varies in several ways and is less  flexible than the WordPress you download  and install yourself. 
  42. 42. Wordpress.Com Signup   
  43. 43. Wordpress.com Signup 2   
  44. 44. Wordpress.Com Signup 3 
  45. 45. Wordpress.Com Confirmation 
  46. 46. Wordpress is a CMS    While not engineered originally to be as  robust and customizable as the ‘BIG’ CMS  applications, Wordpress can do all the basics.     K.I.S.S. – Keep It Simple Stupid – Why use a  sledge hammer to pound in a tack?    Great for individuals, small businesses as a  web publishing tool. Still best for ‘pushing’  information out, not as good for interaction &  community building.  
  47. 47. Just to be clear…      From here on out I’m talking about the script  you can download from Wordpress.org and  installing it on a web server.    In order to do this you will need an account on  a web host that has a server that meets the  technical requirements for installing and  running wordpress. 
  48. 48. Wordpress Requirements    http://wordpress.org/about/requirements/    PHP version 4.3 or greater    MySQL 4.0 or greater    The mod_rewrite Apache module    (as of 04/28/09 for Wordpress 2.7.1) 
  49. 49. SECTION III ‐ INSTALLATION    This section covers the basics of installation  of wordpress including;    Downloading & uploading    Setting up wordpress    Initial configuration 
  50. 50. Download & FTP    The Hard Way: Download and FTP    http://wordpress.org/ ‐ Follow links for  download.     You’ll end up with latest.tar.gz or latest.zip on  your desktop. You should be able to double  click on this to uncompress.    You’ll end up with a folder named ‘wordpress’  with a number of files and sub‐folders in it. 
  51. 51. FTP Client      Mac     CyberDuck ‐ http://cyberduck.ch/    Or command line: /applications/utilities/terminal    Windows    FileZilla ‐ http://filezilla.sourceforge.net/  Upload the contents of the wordpress folder to  wherever you want your wordpress install to  resolve to. 
  52. 52. Your Web Hosting Account      You’ll get a username & password.    They should tell you the ‘path’ where your website  resolves to:    PATH = The folder where your website is located,  usually something like:  /home/accountname/public_html/    If you have an existing website and want to  experiment with wordpress elsewhere you can put it  in a sub‐folder:   /home/accountname/public_html/testfolder/  
  53. 53. Upload the files    Use your ftp client to upload (aka PUT) the  contents of the wordpress folder you have on  your computer to the “PATH” where your  website resolves to.    Note – The above says ‘THE CONTENTS’ of  the wordpress folder. Don’t upload the folder  itself.  
  54. 54. MySQL      You may need to contact your web host on  how to set this up since it varies from host to  host.     You need a MySQL database name and an  MySQL account name that has permissions  to write and setup that database. 
  55. 55. cPanel    Many web hosts offer a web management  system to control options for your account  like e‐mail addresses, ftp accounts, and  MySQL.     In this example I’ll be using some tools  included with cPanel, a popular tool that  many hosts offer to set up a MySQL database    Other hosts offer plesk, Hsphere and other  tools that basically do the same thing. 
  56. 56. cPanel Database Section  • Use the “MySQL Database Wizard” to create a  database and a MySQL user with permissions to  access that database. 
  57. 57. MySQL Database Wizard 
  58. 58. MySQL Database Wizard 2 
  59. 59. MySQL Database Wizard 3 
  60. 60. MySQL Database Wizard 4 
  61. 61. cPanel video tutorials    cPanel actually has free video tutorials for a  number of options – These are available to  anyone.     My SQL ‐ A guide to creating and modifying  MySQL databases in cPanel.    MySQL Wizard ‐ Create and manage MySQL  databases with this step by step wizard. 
  62. 62. Initial Configuration    For tonight’s workshop I’m using:    http://wordpress.downeastlearning.org    I just created this for this workshop, just happened  to call it wordpress, it could be anything.    The web interface is just a shortcut to editing  the wp‐config.php file. You can create this by  just copying the wp‐config‐sample.php to  wp‐config.php and manually entering these  values. 
  63. 63. Configuring via web      In order to start the configuration through a  web browser just open the URL where you  put your install.    In order for wordpress to create the wp‐ config.php file the directory with your  wordpress install needs to allow the  webserver to be able to create & edit files.  
  64. 64. Permissions & wp‐config.php  It will try to auto‐create the wp‐config.php file but this doesn’t always work.  
  65. 65. Welcome to Wordpress 
  66. 66. Set database information 
  67. 67. Run the install 
  68. 68. Set title and contact e‐mail 
  69. 69. Confirmation 
  70. 70. You’ll get an e‐mail too 
  71. 71. cPanel & Fantastico!    cPanel includes a utility called Fantastico!  that has quick installs for a number of  utilities, including wordpress. 
  72. 72. Fantastico! WP Install 
  73. 73. E‐mail confirmation 
  74. 74. /wp‐admin for admin login    To login to the admin part of your wordpress  install just use the url with /wp‐admin  appended to it    For our examples :    http://wordpress.downeastlearning.org/wp‐ admin    http://wordpress2.downeastlearning.org/wp‐ admin 
  75. 75. Login 
  76. 76. SECTION IV – Basic Configuration 
  77. 77. The Dashboard 
  78. 78. Dashboard Top 
  79. 79. Dashboard – Top Right 
  80. 80. Profile 
  81. 81. Contact Info (mostly optional) 
  82. 82. About Yourself (optional) 
  83. 83. Set new password 
  84. 84. What your site looks like 
  85. 85. Wordpress Terminology    Posts – Blog entries, news. Time stamped.    Pages – For static content. Date not  important    Categories – For organizing content by  different topics. Example – Blog entries,  news, press releases, photos, family. Can  have multiple for each post.    Tags – like categories but more casual.  
  86. 86. Wordpress Terminology 2     Links – For list of URLs of other sites     Link categories – For organizing your links  into groups    Widget – Small tool for displaying custom  content in sidebar columns (sometimes  header & footer)    Plugin – Add‐on scripts. TONS of choices    Theme – The design, look & feel of your site 
  87. 87. Dashboard – left sidebar 
  88. 88. SECTION V ‐ Settings     The following is a quick overview of the  settings options and my suggestions for ‘Best  Practices’.     Other books & tutorials will suggest  otherwise. Find what works best for you. 
  89. 89. Settings 
  90. 90. General Settings 
  91. 91. Writing Settings 
  92. 92. Remote Publishing 
  93. 93. Post via e‐mail 
  94. 94. Update Services 
  95. 95. Reading Settings 
  96. 96. Discussion Settings 1 
  97. 97. Discussion Settings 2 
  98. 98. Discussion settings ‐ 3 
  99. 99. Comment Moderation 
  100. 100. Comment Blacklist 
  101. 101. Avatars 
  102. 102. Media Settings 
  103. 103. Privacy Settings  Google & Yahoo WILL find your blog if you leave the  above public. You may want to wait until you are  done setting up before it starts referring people to  your site. 
  104. 104. Permalinks  http://codex.wordpress.org/Using_Permalinks 
  105. 105. Permalink Options    Simple ‐ /%postname%/    Organized ‐ /%category%/%postname%/    Chrono ‐ /%year%/%month%/%day%/ %postname%/    Structure for growth. Assume you will be  adding pages later so plan a heirarchy. 
  106. 106. Custom Category & tag path 
  107. 107. Miscellaneous Settings 
  108. 108. Posts and Pages    Posts are for blog entries, announcements, news,  etc. Time stamped, date sensitive stuff.  Categorized and tagged for easy sorting.    Pages are for ‘permanent’ content. About Us.  Contact Us. Directions.     Pages can be nested in a heirarchy    /press‐kit    /press‐kit/biography    /press‐kit/reviews  /press‐kit/photos  
  109. 109. Creating a Post 
  110. 110. Add New Post 
  111. 111. Visual Editor Bar 
  112. 112. Visual Editor w/ Kitchen Sink 
  113. 113. Format 
  114. 114. Excerpt 
  115. 115. Trackbacks 
  116. 116. Discussion 
  117. 117. Publish 
  118. 118. Tags 
  119. 119. Categories 
  120. 120. Adding Images to a Post/page 
  121. 121. Add An Image 
  122. 122. Add An Image – Waiting for upload 
  123. 123. Image Properties 
  124. 124. Insert Image Into Post 
  125. 125. SECTION VI ‐ Plugins  This section includes how to find, install,  activate and configure plugins.  Plugins add additional functionality to your  wordpress install.   Thousands are available   ‘There’s an app for that’ 
  126. 126. Install Plugins 
  127. 127. Install Plugins 2   
  128. 128. Install Plugins 3 
  129. 129. Currently Active Plugins 
  130. 130. Upgrading Plugins 
  131. 131. Upgrade Plugin Needed 
  132. 132. Upgrade Plugin Summary 
  133. 133. Akismet  • If you are going to have comments you NEED akismet.  • Comment spammers are EVIL.   • They WILL bother you, no matter how small your site.  • If you are going to take comments then require account  (with verified) e‐mail address &/or Captcha.   • Also require admin approval. You don’t want stuff on your  site without knowing what it is. 
  134. 134. Akismet is almost ready  This warning will appear at the top of all your dashboard  pages until you give it a valid key. 
  135. 135. Akismet Configuration Menu Option  Note the new addition under your Plugins Menu for  Akismet Configuration 
  136. 136. Akismet Key Needed 
  137. 137. Akismet Valid Key 
  138. 138. My Favorite Plugins  Akismet    2.2.3        All in One SEO Pack   1.4.91       Auto‐hyperlink URLs   3.0       Google Analytics for WordPress   2.9.1       Google XML Sitemaps   3.1.2       NextGEN Gallery   1.2.1       Search Everything   5       ShareThis   2.3       ShiftThis | Order Pages   0.3       WordPress Database Backup   2.2.2      
  139. 139. Backups    Remember, all your data is in the server and in  the database.   Your webhost may do backups but they may not    be available on demand, just in case of server  crash.   Don’t assume others are taking care of this.    Better safe than sorry.  Wordpress Database Backup – Weekly DB dumps    via e‐mail. Get a gmail account.  FTP down the wp‐content folder to get all    plugins, themes, uploaded media. 
  140. 140. SECTION VII ‐ Themes  “Icing on the cake”  Themes are the design of your  website. Since this is separate from  the content you can change themes  without changing the content of a  page.   The theme design files are shared site  wide, so any change affects all pages. 
  141. 141. Themes Basics    No automatic installation of WP themes (yet)     FTP the uncompressed theme folder into / wp‐content/themes/    You can have a number of themes installed  and switch easily, don’t be afraid to get a  bunch to try out. It’s free. They aren’t that big.  You can always delete later. 
  142. 142. Finding Themes    Free & Commercial themes are available.  Searching for ‘wordpress theme’ will find  thousands of results    WordPress theme directory – Free theme  directory available on wordpress.org. 743  themes as of today.    If searching elsewhere ‐ Look for themes  2008 or later. Make sure they are ‘widget  ready’  
  143. 143. Wordpress Theme Directory 
  144. 144. Manage Themes 
  145. 145. Widgets    “Widgets” are tools to customize the  sidebar(s) of your website.     Some plugins add new widgets    Common widgets are the search box, recent  posts, tag clouds, etc.     Text widget can be anything (but you have to  use HTML to format it) 
  146. 146. SECTION VIII ‐ SEO    SEO – Search Engine Optimization    This is just a very very brief overview of this.  Entire books have been written on this  subject and people who are experts in this  make huge amounts of money.     I am NOT an SEO expert (and thus am giving  a free presentation  ) 
  147. 147. All‐In‐One‐SEO Plugin      This plugin adds some useful functionality to  wordpress to allow for adding summary,  descriptions and keywords to each post/page,  as well as the entire site.    There is more info about this plugin and how  to best leverage it at it’s website ‐  http://semperfiwebdesign.com/portfolio/ wordpress/wordpress‐plugins/all‐in‐one‐seo‐ pack/#more‐59 
  148. 148. All‐In‐One Options for Post 
  149. 149. SEO Basics    Links Matter – Get clients, friends, business  partners to link to your site, ideally using  some keywords you want searches to reflect.  In return link to their sites.    Don’t Lie – Your summary, description and  keywords should reflect the real content of  your page. Trying to put keywords or other  content that doesn’t match will cause you to  be penalized in rankings 
  150. 150. Hubspot Website Grader 
  151. 151. RSS in Plain English 
  152. 152. SECTION IX – Q & A and Demos    Happy to field questions.     Depending on time we can look ‘under the  hood’ at some live wordpress sites I have  access to to see how they are setup and what  they are using. 
  153. 153. Recommended Reading 
  154. 154. Launching A Wordpress Blog EBook  http://www.genealogy‐web‐creations.com/launching‐ wordpress‐blog.html 
  155. 155. Youtube Video Tutorials    Search for Wordpress or “Wordpress 2.7” on  Youtube and you’ll find all sorts of  ‘screencasts’ that will walk you through  various tasks. 
  156. 156. SECTION X – Wrap‐up    Thanks for attending this workshop.  Feedback appreciated, either in person or e‐ mail me (matt@baya.net).   Copy of this powerpoint will be available on  downeastlearning.org 
  157. 157. Donations accepted    Did you appreciate this class?  We incurred some costs making this event  happen and would appreciate anything you  feel you can spare.   There is a box for donations located near the  front of the room. 
  158. 158. It’s not over…  This class can be continued online at     http://downeastlearning.org/    Forums    Mailing lists    Polls & discussion about future classes  Learn from each other.    Happy to answer questions. 

×