Inspiration For Photo Joinery

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Inspiration For Photo Joinery

  1. 1. Inspiration for Photo Joinery<br />
  2. 2. Cubism<br />It was a 20th century art movement, <br />Started by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, <br />It revolutionized European painting and sculpture<br />The first branch of cubism, known as Analytic Cubism between 1907 and 1911 in France. <br />In its second phase, Synthetic Cubism, the movement spread and remained vital until around 1919, when the Surrealist movement gained popularity.<br />In cubist artworks, objects are broken up, and re-assembled in an abstracted form<br />Instead of showing the objects from one viewpoint, they show subject from several different viewpoints. Often the surfaces intersect at seemingly random angles, removing a coherent sense of depth. <br />
  3. 3. Pablo Picasso<br />25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973<br />He was a Spanish painter and sculptor <br />He lived most of his adult life in France<br />He was best known for co-founding cubism<br />
  4. 4. This image shows 5 women in the style of cubism. It looks abstract because the image has been assembled to create an abstract affect, he's done this by showing different parts of the image from different viewpoints so it brings life to the picture. Also Picasso has made the background disjointed so it makes the women come out of the background. My opinion is that I like the way that the colours of the background are balanced out well and brings the image to life better.<br />Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907 – Pablo Picasso<br />
  5. 5. Georges Braque<br />13 May 1882 – 31 August 1963<br />He was a French painter and sculptor<br />He was best known for co-founding cubism with Picasso <br />
  6. 6. This picture shows cubism because you can see that the image has been broken up, and reassembled so the parts overlap and join together at strange angles. Also the different parts of the image are from different viewpoints so it brings the image to life, also the background is disjointed which also brings the violins and candlesticks out of the image. My opinion of it is I like the way that the objects in the image overlap and seem to come out of the picture.<br />Violin and Candlestick Paris, spring 1910 <br />– Georges Braque<br />

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