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Promoting teaching as a deadly profession

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Promoting teaching as a deadly profession …

Promoting teaching as a deadly profession
Yungorrendi First Nations Centre

Presentation at Yamaiyamarna Paitya | Teachers are deadly! 2012 national MATSITI conference, July 9-11, Tarndanya (Adelaide), 9-11 July.
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative.

Published in: Education, Career

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  • 4 minutes TBInterview studentsGraduates AcademicsPeople from the sector: Flinders University School of Education, DECD, Catholic Education, Independent Schools
  • Transcript

    • 1. How to make teaching deadly?Marketing teaching as a career presented byA/Prof Tracey Bunda, Simone Ulalka Tur, Jackie Wurm Yunggorendi First Nations Centre, Flinders University Yamaiyamarna Paitya Teachers are deadly! conference Adelaide, 10 July 2012
    • 2. acknowledgementto countryWe acknowledge the Kaurna people – the traditional owners of thelands and waters on which the city of Adelaide was built.Tarndanyunga Kaurna YertaWe have shelter, food and an income from living on Kaurna lands.We also have love, care and a sense of being a part of anextended family made by Aboriginal people and white friendsbecause we are on Kaurna country. We are grateful. This is anexpression of respect and we view any acknowledgement as asignificant and symbolic marker of cultural protocol.
    • 3. introduction• Yunggorendi First Nations Centre• recruiting/supporting/teaching/research/engaging• over 280 alumni after 21 years
    • 4. outline1. MATSITI project “Tellin’ the stories of teachers; tellin’ the stories of teaching”2. reflect on personal and professional journeys into teaching3. staying on the teaching path4. recommendations
    • 5. MATSITI / more Aboriginal teachers project• “Tellin’ the stories of teachers; tellin’ the stories of teaching”• digital / historical archive of Indigenous teacher education voices• to engage Indigenous students & advisers• encourage students to consider teacher education as a future career
    • 6. journeys into teaching• the power of story• Angelina’s story
    • 7. Atninkarle Apurte-irrerelte-aneme akaltye-irreretyeke big mob – together – to learn – in this place
    • 8. journeys into teaching - reflection• best promotion of teaching as a career is being a deadly teacher!• ACTIVITY: map your teaching career• to create a conference display
    • 9. my teaching careerKeyword: Keyword: OR? OR?Keyword: Keyword:
    • 10. staying on the teaching path• keyword/s-> leading to recommendations• top 3
    • 11. prompting your thinking fordeveloping recommendations• supporting others’ journeys as teachers• who should take action?• when should action be taken?• by whom and who for?• why action is important
    • 12. recommendationsTo promote more Aboriginal and TorresStrait Islander teacherswe recommend that…
    • 13. thank you• Long Way Home – sustenance for your journey• www.flinders.edu.au/yunggorendi• www.facebook.com/YunggorendiCentre