Indigenous Schooling in the 21st Century and the Digital Inclusion Agenda

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Professor Lester-Irabinna Rigney keynote presentation at MATSITI Deadly Career Forum, Adelaide, 15 October 2013

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  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • Within the curriculum of each state & territory, as well as with the development of a National Curriculum, there are numerous subject [learning] areas. A number of these are considered Key/Core Subject Areas. These are common in all jurisdictions, with additional subject/learning areas also common, though with variation depending on individual state or territory emphases. The same applies to the National Curriculum process, where there is an initial development of core subject/learning areas.
    While areas may be common, titles for these vary between states & territories. This is more common with areas other than English [Language], Mathematics and Science. It is even more common with sub-areas within these, especially in secondary years, where individual subjects occur more than areas, as at the Primary level.
  • Really COAG agenda of closing the gap means Halve the gap no reduce it no NIL
  • Interview with Professor John Halsey, Sidney Myer Chair of Rural Education and Communities, Flinders University who recently visited Naracoorte to get ideas on what rural people want for their communities. He says he and his staff collected information from Karoonda, Kadina, Kimba, Loxton and Burra. He says they also received information from people at the Naracoorte show. Halsey says people want access to good education and young people need to be retained for future generations. Richardson mentions Lucindale school which keeps the local community alive. Rural and remote communities are under immense pressure from declining population and the "double whammy" of deteriorating services that are rising in cost. At the same time, the role of those communities in producing food, supplying energy and resources, managing water and the environment has never been more important. Halsey refers to the sense that country people feel, that they are not being heard or understood by city-centric Government leaders, in terms of their needs. He says survey results will be put into a report and sent to Government and key agencies. He refers to the closure of rural hospitals and compares funds spent on the Adelaide Oval and city tram lines. Halsey says this sends a message that rural communities are not as important as cities. He mentions Monsignor Cappo who works with the disadvantaged in the city and suggests rural people need to be represented similarly.
  • In science When we ask students to examine photo syenthesis they become bored quickly. Seeking answers to big question place selective concepts like Photosynthesis within modern challenges like climate change. Similarly When ask students to examine colonial and settler relationships is needs to be within the context of my ten big questions.
  • Comparing the Web and the Library of Congress
  • Wagner calls for the reinvention of schools for the 21st Century for the sake of our children who need skills and knowledges to address the successes and ills inherited from the previous generation
  • Framework for 21st Century Learning
    The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes(a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century.
    The key elements of 21st century learning are represented in the graphicand descriptions below. The graphic represents both 21st century skillsstudent outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and 21st century skills support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom). 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • In addition to these subjects, we believe schools must move beyond a focus on basic competency in core subjects to promoting understanding of academic content at much higher levels by weaving
    The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes(a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century.
    The key elements of 21st century learning are represented in the graphicand descriptions below. The graphic represents both 21st century skillsstudent outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and 21st century skills support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom). 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • In addition to these subjects, we believe schools must move beyond a focus on basic competency in core subjects to promoting understanding of academic content at much higher levels by weaving
    The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes(a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century.
    The key elements of 21st century learning are represented in the graphicand descriptions below. The graphic represents both 21st century skillsstudent outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and 21st century skills support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom). 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • Indigenous Schooling in the 21st Century and the Digital Inclusion Agenda

    1. 1. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Faculty of Sciences What school Teachers will Encounter: Indigenous Schooling in the 21st Century and The Digital Inclusion Agenda and the Ten Big Questions. Dr Lester-Irabinna Rigney BE.d, ME.d, PhD, MACE Professor, Dean Indigenous Education MATSITI Conference Cairns 14-15 October 2013 Life Impact | The University of Adelaide Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    2. 2. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Dr Lester-Irabinna Rigney Writings 2011 ACER Nola Purdie Publisher: APi Network, Curtin University of Technology 2006 Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    3. 3. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Which Australian map have you been taught Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    4. 4. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Which Australian map have you been taught Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    5. 5. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Classroom Portraits Julian Germain’s Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    6. 6. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Classroom Portraits Julian Germain’s Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    7. 7. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Classroom Portraits Julian Germain’s Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    8. 8. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Classroom Portraits Julian Germain’s Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    9. 9. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Classroom Portraits Julian Germain’s Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    10. 10. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Classroom Portraits Julian Germain’s Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    11. 11. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Rebecca Richards - Australia's First Aboriginal Rhodes Scholar to Oxford University . Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    12. 12. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences 1960 – 2000 Indigenizing Schools Challenges, Demand and Priorities. 1.Aboriginal Education - Teachers, Curriculum, Leaders. 2.Linguistics – Language maintenance revival. 3.Law – Land Rights, Sovereignty, Human Rights. 4.Anthropology - Identity, community. 5.Medicine – Health practitioners, nurses, doctors. 6.ACCESS, EQUITY, EO. - Humanities, Social Sciences, Health Science, Professions Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    13. 13. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Indigenous Studies Indigenous Perspectives Education Health Science Arts Humanities Engineer and Tech Languages Social Science Math Science Vertical Indigenous Studies CORE Curriculum 8 - key learning Areas Horizontal Indigenous Perspectives Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    14. 14. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences 2000 - Indigenizing Schools Wicked Problems, Grand Horizon Challenges Biodiversity loss Literacy -Numeracy Carbon Renewable Energy World food shortage Fresh water fall - Sea level rise Climate Change Digital Literacy/Revolution as entrance to next generation economies - Science, Computer Sciences, Engineering, Professions, Mathematics Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    15. 15. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences The Wicked Problems and their Solutions Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    16. 16. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Why Change is Needed? 1. Indigenizing Schools for Catch up - Parity - Re-active 2. Balance between Aboriginal determined futures and academy has been lost and we need to re-establish it. 3. Indigenizing the Schools for the Horizon - Proactive to Wicked Problems - Build on momentum from past 3 decades of Indigenizing the Academy - Build a modern, digital ready 21st century Indigenous education Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    17. 17. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences What should we hope to achieve? • Relevance of curriculum innovation in our discipline areas of Aboriginal Studies – Aboriginal Education. • Addressing the under theorisation of Aboriginal in the Wicked Problems • Produce Aboriginal leaders able to - Guide the next generation through wicked problem, - 21st Century digital literacies and economies, - STEM related Careers Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    18. 18. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Canada, USA and Australia Indigenous higher education attainment factors include: -Enrolment & Commencement considerably less than others • Most enrolments Health, Law, education, Nursing • low numbers in science, Maths technology, and architecture, Engineering • Retention and success rates approx. 30 % lower • In Australia an increase of over 600% required for number of PhD candidates to reach population parity Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    19. 19. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Q&A - remote and live audiences Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    20. 20. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences As the global community looks for ways to meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of halving the share of people in poverty by 2015 from it s 1990 level , it cannot afford to ignore the plight of indigenous peoples . Hall and Patrinos (2006) Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    21. 21. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Taylor 2006 Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    22. 22. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Temporary Mobility Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    23. 23. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences What does Aboriginal Education in the 21st Century look like? Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    24. 24. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    25. 25. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Demography Trends Tony Vinson (2007) Dropping Off the Edge Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    26. 26. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Hope • (BER) Building the Education Revolution $16.2 billion • National Curriculum • Closing Gap • (NBN) National Broadband Network $43 billion; • (EYLF) Early Years Learning Framework • (NTER) NT Emergency Response $587 Million (07-08) • (NPST) National Professional Standards for Teachers Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    27. 27. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    28. 28. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Professor Rigney’s 10 Big Questions for a modern Aboriginal curriculum 28 Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    29. 29. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences The Ten Big Questions 1. How did Aboriginal cultures begin? 2. How does the Earth work? 3. What is life, what is culture and Language? 4. How are Aboriginal cultures evolving on Earth? 5. How do we unravel the causes of Aboriginal disease? 6. Why does climate change from an Aboriginal view? 7. How can we feed the World sustainably? 8. How can we reduce our reliance on governments? 9. How will we conserve Aboriginal diversity? 10. Where will the science and digital revolution take us? 29 Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    30. 30. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Q&A - remote and live audiences Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    31. 31. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Sophisticated Vocabulary Old • • • • • • • • • • • • Recent Hard drive URL Format DoS Youtube 2005 Wiki Terabyte Blog Cookie E-mail Firewall Macros More Recent • Blackhole Exploit kit • Web cloud • Stuxnet • Mobile botnet • WSoD –White Screen of Death • TeamViewer • Virus Sponsored • AriOS • iPad 2 • Tuenti •4shared •MongoDB •Ultrabook •Haswell •hardware(Sponsored) » •Tick-tock •Tri-Gate •Ivy Bridge •Sandy Bridge •Chromebook •Google+ (Google Plus) Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    32. 32. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Digital Divide Digital Inclusion Rigney, L-I, Falkner, K, Radoll, P & Williams, M (2013), Digital Inclusion and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: A Discussion Paper ” Tasmania South Australia Figure 12 South Australian household Internet access by remoteness Indigenous and non-Indigenous Northern Territory Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    33. 33. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Digital Divide Digital Inclusion Rigney, L-I, Falkner, K, Radoll, P & Williams, M (2013), Digital Inclusion and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: A Discussion Paper ” Reason for not having computer Type Internet Connection Types of Phone Used at home Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    34. 34. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Sophisticated Numeracy Recent • US Library of Congress 3 Petabyte • LC has 20 million books and each requires 1 MB. • LC printed text, 13 million photos, even if compressed to a 1 MB JPG each, would be 13 terabytes. • The 4 million maps in Geography Division might scan to 200 TB. • Over 500k movies; at 1 GB each they would be 500 terabytes • Bulkiest 3.5 million sound recordings, which at one audio CD each, would be almost 2,000 TB. • Makes total size of Library perhaps about 3 petabytes (3,000 terabytes). · 1 Bit = Binary Digit · · · · · · · · · · · 8 Bits = 1 Byte 1024 Bytes = 1 Kilobyte 1024 Kilobytes = 1 Megabyte 1024 Megabytes = 1 Gigabyte 1024 Gigabytes = 1 Terabyte 1024 Terabytes = 1 Petabyte 1024 Petabytes = 1 Exabyte 1024 Exabytes = 1 Zettabyte 1024 Zettabytes = 1 Yottabyte 1024 Yottabytes = 1 Brontobyte 1024 Brontobytes = 1 Geopbyte Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    35. 35. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Some Key Thinkers in the area? Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    36. 36. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Oxford Professor Martin Westall Young people in the 21st Century will spend their adult lives in a multitasking, multifaceted, technologydriven, diverse, rapidly changing world which is far removed from the world faced by most of their teachers at the time they entered adulthood Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    37. 37. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Oxford Professor Martin Westall • • • • • • • • Schools 24/7 IT no replacement for teacher Globalism Problem solving Communication News jobs Sandwich generation rapid change and turnover Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    38. 38. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Harvard Professor: Tony Wagner “Despite the best efforts of educators, schools are ‘dangerously obsolete” “Why don’t even the best schools fail to teach the new survival skills our children need for the future “Old world of school New world of work” Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    39. 39. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Harvard Professor Tony Wagner Seven Survival skills •Collaboration across networks •Effective Oral and Written Communication •Accessing and analysing information •Curiosity and imagination •Agility & adaptability •Initiative &Entrepreneurialism Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    40. 40. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Anthony Wilhelm • Access is not enough • ICT Luxury or essential to survival? • Digital ghettos • New technologies no recipe for success • ICT Human rights lag • Digital surveillance • Every citizen should know how to use a computer • Decline of the nation state and its laws Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    41. 41. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Partnerships 21 Century USA ‘Framework for 21st Century Skills’ Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    42. 42. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Partnerships 21 Century Core Subjects and 21st Century Themes Core subjects include: English, reading or language arts , World languages Arts, Mathematics , Economics , Science , Geography , History, Government and Civics 21st century interdisciplinary themes into core subjects: • Global awareness, Financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, Civic literacy, Health literacy, Environmental literacy Learning and thinking skills, Financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial Literacy, Civic, health and environmental Literacy, Information and communication technology (ICT), Life Skills, Modern assessment of 21st Century skills Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    43. 43. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences What can I do as a teacher/parent • Kids love challenges - schools and university are the right place • Be Present • Turn kids on to learning at home and school. • Reading at home – Be a volunteer - Library culture • Move away from same old thing • Parent partnerships with schools • Not be tempted by quick fixes • Do not become a Prisoner of Despair All problems have a use by date Life Impact | The University of Adelaide
    44. 44. ELFS – Faculty of Sciences Q&A - remote and live audiences Life Impact | The University of Adelaide

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