Embedding indigenous Perspectives into Science

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Embedding Indigenous Perspectives into Science to support implementation of the Australian Curriculum …

Embedding Indigenous Perspectives into Science to support implementation of the Australian Curriculum
Joe Sambono, Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment

Presentation at Yamaiyamarna Paitya | Teachers are deadly! 2012 national MATSITI conference, July 9-11, Tarndanya (Adelaide), 9-11 July.
More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative.

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  • Who am I, What do I do, C2C-P-10
  • Barriers and resistance! Not science…philosophy, epistemologies and empiricism. Hidden history…shame or embarrasment in teachers knowledge gap…racism euro dominance of society.
  • Red dots show where ACARA have identified content descriptors that include Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures
  • Black dots show content descriptors where I have been able to see opportunities to include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culture
  • Total dots represent times content descriptors have been used from P-10, green indicates single content descriptors that have been used more than once by

Transcript

  • 1. Embedding Indigenous perspectives into resources to support implementation of theAustralian Curriculum - Science.
  • 2. Joe SambonoPrincipal Project OfficerIndigenous Schooling Support Unit –CSQDepartment of Education, Training and Employmentjoseph.sambono@dete.qld.gov.auC2C P-10Science
  • 3. Why embed Indigenous histories and cultures into curriculum?• ACARA:The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priority provides opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. This knowledge and understanding will enrich their ability to participate positively in the ongoing development of Australia.• Reconciliation• Positive identities• Hidden histories/facts• Greater educational outcomes for Indigenous students
  • 4. Barriers to embedding• Many established educators are products of a system that has not acknowledged or taught them about Indigenous Australians• Major knowledge gaps exist in our educators…us too. We can’t know all.• Subject snobbery and gatekeeping• We are still recovering from past mandates.
  • 5. Science as an Indigenous perspective/context• Debate• Parallels often accepted easier than perspectives.• More education and awareness of Indigenous knowledge will in time change erroneous views• Things are changing…Indigenous ways are progressively being recognised more and more….
  • 6. TEK is becoming more regarded by scientists and is gaining traction and recognition as science knowledge.Applied ecology/ Restoration ecology are fields of science that are being utilised more and more with the realisation that the earths environments are in distress.Applied and restorative ecology rely heavily on the TEK held by indigenous groups when formulating better land management practices.Our technological advancements have separated us further and further from the land. This has massive ramifications. No doubt we will be looking at how Indigenous groups of the world lived sustainably more and more.I believe it is here that we will see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander science and the ways traditional knowledge and western scientific knowledge can be complementary.Jan 2012 ecological management and restoration special issue on entirely on indigenous land and sea management.
  • 7. Cross-Curriculum PriorityACARA also recognise the significance of Indigenous Science Knowledge and have included it as one of three cross-curriculum PRIORITIESThe Australian Curriculum: science values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. It acknowledges that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have longstanding scientific knowledge traditions.
  • 8. ACARA state that this cross-curriculum priority willensure the following:•Students will have opportunities to learn that Aboriginal andTorres Strait Islander Peoples have developed knowledge aboutthe world through observation, using all the senses; throughprediction and hypothesis; through testing (trial and error); andthrough making generalisations within specific contexts. Thesescientific methods have been practised and transmitted from onegeneration to the next. Students will develop an understanding thatAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples have particular ways ofknowing the world and continue to be innovative in providing significantcontributions to development in science. They will investigateexamples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander science and theways traditional knowledge and western scientific knowledge canbe complementary.
  • 9. Limitations• Although ACARA recognise importance of Indigenous science ACARA has limitations• We need to battle low representation-more can be done• ACARA within the Australian curriculum have used a flag (i.e. hand print) to denote which content descriptors include an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander history or culture
  • 10. Science Science as a human Science enquiry Understandings endeavor skillsFoundation ■1 ■2 ■3 ■■4 ■5 ■6 ■7 ■ ■■■8 ■910
  • 11. Science Science as a human Science enquiry Understandings endeavor skillsFoundation ■■■ ■1 ■■■ ■■2 ■■■ ■■3 ■■ ■■4 ■■■■■ ■■ ■■■■5 ■■ ■■■■ ■6 ■■■ ■■■ ■7 ■■■ ■■■ ■■■■8 ■■9 ■■■■ ■■■■ ■■10 ■■■■■■ ■■■ ■■■■
  • 12. Science Science as a human Science enquiry Understandings endeavor skillsFoundation ■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■1 ■■■■ ■■■■■2 ■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■3 ■■■■■ ■ ■■■■4 ■■■■■ ■■■■ ■■■■5 ■■ ■■■■■■■ ■6 ■■■■ ■■■ ■7 ■■■■■ ■ ■ ■■■■ ■■■■8 ■■■9 ■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■ ■■■■■10 ■■■■■■■■■ ■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■
  • 13. How can we do more?• I believe it is in finding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories that are relevant to as many of the content descriptors as possible
  • 14. Answering the content descriptors
  • 15. What does a lesson look like that contains an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander history or culture?Four quick examples2.Lesson3.Assessment4.Activity5.Resource
  • 16. Lesson example• Year 10• Responding to Global Issues — Ethics and Human ActionAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culturesStudents will discuss Aboriginal peoples and Torres strait island people’s knowledge about environmental management and climate change.
  • 17. Lesson example summary• This lesson is not focusing on an Indigenous perspective, it focuses on the lesson context – the global issue of carbon dioxide and how humans are working to reduce it.• In delivering this information we have been able to successfully embed an Indigenous perspective without it coming across as tokenistic or piecemeal
  • 18. Assessment example• Year 4• Materials and their purpose — How Indigenous peoples of the world use natural materialsAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culturesStudents will:• access Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ knowledge about the use of natural materials due to the properties of these materials• access how this knowledge influences the subsequent use and manipulation of natural materials
  • 19. Assessment example summary• This lesson uses an Indigenous context to provide students with the opportunity to see first hand how Indigenous Australians have been working scientifically for thousands of years.• It also shows how Indigenous Australians possess great scientific understandings that enable them to produce paints that look spectacular and able to stick to surfaces for thousands of years• This example also shows that CCPs can be included as an assessable element
  • 20. Activity example• Year 2• Exploring pushes and pulls —Exploring pushes and pulls offamiliar objects• Making a mammandur
  • 21. Activity example summaryThrough using this activity students will:•access Aboriginal peoples and Torres StraitIslander peoples’ knowledge about pushes,pulls and materials needed to maketraditional spinning toys•replicate a traditional Aboriginal spinningtoy using contemporary materials.
  • 22. Resource example• http://vimeopro.com/user7524645/fire-by-frictio• Year 9• Exploring combustion — Introducing bushfire chemistry• Students will develop an understanding of traditional Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ knowledge of combustion processes
  • 23. Thanks for listening!!!