MATC Fall Lecture Series: Robert Kollmar

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MATC Fall 2012 Lecture Series

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MATC Fall Lecture Series: Robert Kollmar

  1. 1. Association 1 American Railroads of 12/5/2012
  2. 2. ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS AND POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL
  3. 3. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ARAILROAD, APTA, FRA, NTSB AREMA and the AAR?There are several different, yet interrelated organizations whichprovide a myriad of different “services” to the railroad industry.• Standards, specifications and recommended practices• Established and enforces regulations regarding train speeds, track, signals, grade crossings, inspection• Provides fines for non-compliance• Maintains interchange data for all railroads, notifies railroads about non-compliant cars• Investigates accidents, makes safety recommendations• Technical recommendations and standard plans for railroads• Serves as the advocacy organization for the freight rail industry• Talent base is comprised of active railroad managers
  4. 4. A RAILROADMission• Provide safe and efficient transportation at a reasonable cost• Develop customers• Service on-line industry• Interchange with other railroads• Works with stakeholders to develop economic growth• Develops their own standards and recommended practices or uses the industry recommended practices• Volunteer to serve on AAR and AREMA Committees• Make money
  5. 5. AMERICAN PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ADMINISTRATIONVision StatementAPTA is the leading force in advancing public transportation.Mission StatementTo strengthen and improve public transportation, APTA serves andleads its diverse membership through advocacy, innovation andinformation sharing. APTA and its members and staff work to ensurethat public transportation is available and accessible for all Americansin communities across the country.
  6. 6. FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATIONThe purpose of FRA is to:• promulgate and enforce rail safety regulations;• administer railroad assistance programs;• conduct research and development in support of improved railroad safety and national rail transportation policy;• provide for the rehabilitation of Northeast Corridor rail passenger service; and• consolidate government support of rail transportation activities.Headquarters in Washington, DC with offices throughout the USPart of the US Department of Transportation
  7. 7. NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARDCharged with:• investigating every civil aviation accident the United States and significant accidents in other modes of transportation – Railroad – Highway – Marine – PipelineThe NTSB determines the probable cause of the accidents and issues safetyrecommendations aimed at preventing future accidents.Headquartered in Washington, DC with offices throughout the USIndependent Federal Agency
  8. 8. AMERICAN RAILWAY ENGINEERING AND MAINTENANCE-OF-WAY ASSOCIATIONAREMA Mission• The development and advancement of both technical and practical knowledge and recommended practices pertaining to the design, construction and maintenance of railway infrastructure.• Volumes of Recommended Practices• Portfolio of Standard PlansTechnical committees comprised of the entire railroad industry –railroad managers, suppliers, consultants.
  9. 9. ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADSIndependent Trade Association – Not Associated with theGovernmentOur customers are the seven Class 1 railroads, Amtrak, and over200 smaller freight railroads and commuter railroads• Work with elected officials and leaders in Washington, D.C. on critical transportation and related issues• Ensures that the freight rail industry will continue to meet America’s transportation needs today and tomorrow.• The standard setting organization for North Americas railroads for rolling stock (freight cars and locomotives), technology and network operations• Focused on improving the safety and productivity of rail transportation through our own initiatives in cooperation with the FRA and other associations.
  10. 10. ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS• Advance these goals through its two subsidiaries, the Transportation Technology Center Inc. (TTCI) and the Railinc Corp. TTCI is the worlds leading research, development and testing facility, and develops next-generation advancements in safety and operation efficiency. Railinc serves as the rail industry’s leading resource for rail data, information technology and information services, and uses one of the worlds largest data networks to track customer shipments.• AAR also supports the Railroad Research Foundation (RRF), a world-class policy research organization dedicated to sustaining a safe, secure and technologically advanced rail network.
  11. 11. WHAT IS POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL (PTC)?It is an automated, highly complex system which provides the followingfeatures:A communication-based system of functional requirements for monitoringand controlling train movements to provide increased safety. – Prevent train-to-train collisions • Overtake, Head-on, Converging – Prevents trains exceeding speed limits • Permanent speed limits – Train type, track geometry (curve, turnout) • Temporary speed limit – Maintenance of Way slow order restriction or stop board – Prevents incursions into a maintenance work zone – Grade crossing pre-start and health monitoring ***
  12. 12. PTC SYSTEM OVERVIEW
  13. 13. INTEROPERABLE – ELECTRONIC TRAIN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (I-ETMS)• Overlay train control system to the freight railroad’s existing signal systems• Designed to: • Prevent train-to-train collisions • Over-speed protection • Civil speed enforcement • Roadway Worker Protection with Temporary Speed Restrictions applied at the Work Zone• Unique braking algorithms for freight and passenger with appropriate safety factors based on the worst-case braking scenarios• GPS based signal system. I-ETMS does not use transponders
  14. 14. OFFICE SYSTEMS• Back office server – train dispatch centers• Authentication systems must verify users• Interface and numerous enhancements to the train dispatching system• Security application for message integrity• Interoperable train control messaging system• 220 MHz data radio for base station communication• Communication switching network for interoperable back office communications
  15. 15. WAYSIDE SYSTEMS• Switch position monitors (Turnouts)• Integrated and stand-alone Wayside Interface Units (WIU)• Wayside database contains over 200 characteristics of track and trackside assets• 220 MHz data radio for switch and signal communication
  16. 16. LOCOMOTIVE SYSTEMS• Train Management Computer, interactive display• Interoperable electronic train management system software• 220 MHz data radio for locomotive PTC communication• Onboard Systems: • Computer Display Units (CDU) • GPS sensors • Crash hardened memory module • Antenna array for all PTC data transmissions
  17. 17. LOCOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT
  18. 18. TRAIN MANAGEMENT COMPUTER
  19. 19. IN CAB ELECTRONICS ARRAY
  20. 20. THE LOCOMOTIVE• FRA – “All members of the crew have an unobstructed view of the screen”• Locomotive Interface Gateway (LIG) provides integration of PTC functionally into over 30 different existing locomotive configurations – developed through RRF• 18,000 locomotive to be removed from service and shopped installation – at least twice• 4,000 installations have been started (22%)• 1,700 miles of wires and cables
  21. 21. LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER’S CONSOLE
  22. 22. CAB DISPLAY UNIT
  23. 23. PTC LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER’S DISPLAY
  24. 24. RADIO SPECTRUM ANALYSIS
  25. 25. HOW COMPLEX IS PTC?• It is the most expensive and technically complex initiative in railroad history.• 75% of all locomotives will be equipped – 12,700 locomotives• 1,700 miles of new locomotive wiring to be installed• 96,000 miles of railroad tracks must be equipped with PTC and have GPS mapping of 500,000 wayside elements• 50,000 wayside units will be installed• 150,000 - 75% of all railroad employees must receive training• $8 Billion initiative – internally funded by each of the freight railroads (commuter railroads are receiving government funding)
  26. 26. NOW THE HARD PART• PTC is a “new” technology• New nationwide standards are being developed• The freight application is well underway• Locomotives are having equipment installed• Thousands of wayside signal system appliances have been installed• Train dispatching computer systems are being modified• Normally, each railroad can “do their own thing”• Locomotives must be fully capable of operating on their own railroad and on everyone else’s railroad – “Interoperability”• Commuter railroads operate over freight railroad tracks• Configuration management of software and hardware will be a monumental task.
  27. 27. THE SCHEDULE• Each railroad is working diligently to install their own PTC systems• Railroads have had to retain specialized employees and have hired thousands of new employees and contractors to assist• Manufacturing of wayside, locomotive and back office equipment is proceeding to support installation• Each locomotive, wayside installation and back office needs to have a completely new communications system and supporting infrastructure – developed from scratchThis must be completed, by law, by December 31, 2015.This is an unfunded mandate – find your own money and get it done.
  28. 28. SUMMARY - TECHNICAL• The best and the brightest• Thousands of employees and support from manufacturers and consultants• Extremely complex initiative• Simultaneous undertaking by the entire railroad industry• Involvement of all major railroads, commuter rail authorities and some smaller railroads• $ Billions of railroad funded investment
  29. 29. SUMMARY - TALENT• The railroads need talented people. – Class 1 freight railroads – Regional railroads – Short line and terminal companies – Commuter rail agencies – Amtrak• Encourage undergrads and graduate students to explore a myriad of technically and financially challenging opportunities in the railroad industry.• These are good jobs. They pay well – have great benefits – and you will be exposed to, and experience, more things in many diverse areas then you ever thought possible.
  30. 30. Contact InformationR. A. KollmarExecutive Director –Engineering, Communications andTrain Control425 Third StreetSuite 1000Washington, DC 20024(202) 639-2142rkollmar@aar.org !!! (the best way) Association of American Railroads 33 12/5/2012

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