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Running Program with Videos
 

Running Program with Videos

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This video is part of the running course at FitandFunctional.com. At Fit and Functional we train personal trainers to be complete and total fitness and nutrition experts so they can give the most ...

This video is part of the running course at FitandFunctional.com. At Fit and Functional we train personal trainers to be complete and total fitness and nutrition experts so they can give the most value to their clients. Learn how you can become a Personal Trainer at FitandFunctional.com

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    Running Program with Videos Running Program with Videos Presentation Transcript

    • Upright Running MechanicsTraining Running MechanicsForMaximum Velocity Sprint MechanicsAndDistance RunningStage 1Presentation Created By; Seth Forman and Brian Neale
    • This presentation attempts to familiarize coaches and trainerswith the full range of motion that the legs go through during anefficient stride as well as upper body posture. Proper mechanicsallow runners to absorb the majority of the stress of running inthe musculature not the joints.Full range of motion in the lower body and an introduction toposture and arm action is the first of a 3 stage process to applyingefficient running mechanics.Purpose of Stage 1
    • Leg range of motion throughout the stridePart of foot that makes ground contactLocation of ground contact (foot strike in reference tocenter of mass)Direction of force at ground contact.Upper body postureIntroduction to arm actionStage 1
    • Mechanics being trainedIntroduction to Arm ActionSupported Front Side MechanicSupported Backside MechanicSupported Full MechanicMarchingAnklingAnkling plus full mechanicBuild up runThe Program
    • Definition for our use: The coordinated movementbetween shoulder extension / flexion and opposite hipextension / flexion.Arm action improves spinal stability (spine and headsteadiness while shoulders move through their properrange of motion)Arm action helps increase ground contact force whiledecreasing ground contact time.Arm Action
    • What will training arm action help me improve?It helps coordinate muscular activity along the fascialstretch of the spiral line between the shoulder andopposite hip, leg and foot (see Anatomy Trains)Support of the bony anatomy in the torso throughoutthe running strideThe quality of the ground contact phase (total forceapplied at ground contact)Arm Action
    • Seated Arm Action
    • Coaching QueuesBegin in the seated position with legs straight and upper bodyat 90 degreesShoulders and hands should be relaxed with the elbow bentat ~ 90 degreesThe action is moving the fingers from ‘back pocket’ to chinheightArms should never cross the bodyShoulders should not shrug but remain relaxedArms should move at a jogging paceTraining Seated Arm Action
    • Coaching QueuesBegin in the seated positionwith legs straight and upperbody at 90 degreesThis position forces theparticipant to hold theirspine and head neutralwhile the shoulders provideslight upper torso rotation
    • Coaching QueuesShoulders and hands shouldbe relaxed with the elbowbent at ~ 90 degreesThe seated position alsodoes not allow theparticipant to extend thearm at the elbow as thehand travels to ‘backpocket’ ensuring that astretch is experienced at theshoulder not the elbow
    • Coaching QueuesThe action is moving thefingers from ‘back pocket’to chin heightAlthough this is the fullrange of motion necessaryfor sprinting it will ‘up train’the coordinated result ofstretching the proper fascialnetworks for runningefficiency
    • Coaching QueuesThe arms should never crossthe body or flare out to farto the sidesIf the arms cross the body‘over rotation’ in the torsowill occur which is a wasteof energy and results indecreased runningefficiency
    • Coaching QueuesThe shoulders should notshrug but remain relaxedShrugging the shoulders willcause scapular elevation(upper trapezius and necktension), protraction(humeral internal rotation),and inefficiency instretching the spiral line(see Anatomy Trains)
    • Coaching QueuesThe arms should move at ajogging pace from ‘backpocket’ to chin height
    • Definition for our use: All movement that the legundergoes from the time that the thigh reaches itshighest point to the point of ground contact.Most important during stage 1 is to feel the properapplication of the movement.Front Side Mechanics
    • What will front side mechanics help me improve?Plant leg strength (stiffness) improves hip and torsostability as the moving leg approaches ground contactand during ground contact (decreasing hip drop).Plant leg strength (stiffness) develops proper center ofmass height during ground contact so that your nextground contact lands on the ball of the foot under yourcenter of massFront Side Mechanics
    • What will front side mechanics help me improve?Coordination in the moving leg. Training the leg toundergo the proper range of motion so that force isbeing applied in the proper direction at ground contact.Trunk stability – the ability to balance out unnecessarytrunk rotation (over rotation) that is wasteful to energyuse and detrimental to safe movement mechanics.Front Side Mechanics
    • Supported Front Side Mechanics
    • Coaching QueuesPostureUsing your left leg as your plant leg, your left footshould maintain contact with the ground on the ball ofyour foot throughout the exercise. Your left knee shouldbe straight by squeezing your left glute complex as hardas you can (not your quadriceps).Stand tall, arms length away from the wall placing yourleft hand on the wall for support (so that you are talland not leaning).Training Supported Front SideMechanics
    • Coaching QueuesPostureRaise your right leg so that your femur is parallel to thegroundYour right heel should be located under the center ofyour hamstrings and your right foot held in dorsiflexion.Place your right hand on your hip and hold a slightretraction between shoulder blades (so that yourshoulders are held in neutral, not protraction, notretraction)Training Supported Front SideMechanics
    • Coaching QueuesMovementWith your right leg in the top position slowly movetowards the floor so that your right foot begins to travelstraight down.As your foot travels down, and the hip and knee areextending, start to pull the leg back when your rightfoot reaches 2/3rds of the way down the shin, or justabove the ankleTraining Supported Front SideMechanics
    • Coaching QueuesMovementMake contact with the ground on the ball of the footonly, so that your right foot pulls back and ends up nextto your left footSqueeze your right glute complex while your right footis in contact with the ground and hold for one second.Maintain dorsiflexion in your right foot the entire timeTraining Supported Front SideMechanics
    • Coaching QueuesPostureUsing your left leg as your plantleg, your left foot shouldmaintain contact with the groundon the ball of your footthroughout the exercise. Yourleft knee should be straight bysqueezing your left glutecomplex as hard as you can.The glute complex of the plantleg is being squeezed to keep itstrait because during runningwhile the foot is in contact withthe ground the hip should bemoving forward in extension viaactivation of the glute complexand high hamstrings
    • Coaching QueuesPostureStand arms length awayfrom the wall placing yourleft hand on the wall forsupport.
    • Coaching QueuesPostureRaise your right leg away fromthe wall so that your femur isparallel to the groundThis is the top position whentraining maximum velocitysprinting mechanics, however, aspreviously mentioned theparticipant needs to ‘up train’natural reflexes that improverunning efficiency (the flexion /extension relationship betweenlegs)
    • Coaching QueuesPostureYour right heel should belocated under the center ofyour hamstrings and yourright foot held atdorsiflexion.Driving the leg down fromthis position will preventearly knee extension,decreasing decelerationforces at ground contact
    • Coaching QueuesPosturePlace your right hand onyour hip and hold a slightretraction between thelower 1/3 of your shoulderbladesThe goal is to place theshoulders in a neutralposition
    • Coaching QueuesMovementWith your right leg in thetop position slowly movetowards the floor so thatyour right foot begins totravel straight down.As mentioned earlier drivingthe leg strait down from thetop position will preventearly knee extension
    • Coaching QueuesMovementAs your foot travels down,and the knee is extending,start to pull the leg backwhen your right footreaches 2/3rds of the waydown the shin, or just abovethe anklePulling the foot back isessential at ground contactto move the body forwardand decrease decelerationforce
    • Coaching QueuesMovementMaintain dorsiflexion inyour right foot the entiretimeDorsiflexion will pre-stretchthe triceps surae allowingan involuntary plantar flexorresponse at the anklefollowing the loadingexperienced via the ball ofthe foot at ground contact
    • Coaching QueuesMovementMake contact with theground on the ball of thefoot only, so that yourright foot ends up next toyour left foot
    • Coaching QueuesMovementSqueeze your right glutecomplex while your rightfoot is in contact with theground and hold for onesecondThe glutes and highhamstrings will continueworking as the leg travelsbehind the torso duringrunning which is the reasonfor activating the glutesduring ground contact
    • Definition for our use: All movement that the leg undergoes from the end of ground contact to the position wherethe heel reaches its highest point.Backside mechanics also includes the transitional phasewhich includes the movement between the end of backside mechanics and the beginning of front side mechanicsBackside Mechanics
    • What will training back side mechanics help me improve?Plant leg strength, the leg holding its position on theground (during these drills) must provide a tall center ofmass in order to assure quality preparation during the airtime of the moving leg to set up the proper location for thenext ground contact.Backside Mechanics
    • What will training back side mechanics help me improve?Coordination in the moving leg. Training the leg toundergo the proper range of motion so that force is beingapplied in the proper direction at the proper time.Trunk stability – the ability to balance out unnecessarytrunk rotation that is wasteful to energy use anddetrimental to safe movement mechanics.Backside Mechanics
    • Supported Backside Mechanics
    • Coaching QueuesFrom the ‘bottom position’ raise the right foot straightup towards the right gluteStep over the left knee with the right foot ending in the‘top position’Maintain dorsiflexion throughout the entire movementTraining Supported BacksideMechanicsAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceFrom the ‘bottom position’raise the right foot straight uptowards the right gluteIf backside mechanics wereinitiated by knee flexion only(without hip flexion occurringat the same time as seen in thepicture to the right) thequadriceps would activate latein an attempt to recover thetrail leg resulting in early kneeextension during front sidemechanics leading toincreased deceleration forcesand joint stress at groundcontact.
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceStep over the left knee withthe right foot ending in the‘top position’This is known as thetransitional phaseThe top position is thebeginning of front sidemechanics
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceMaintain dorsiflexionthroughout the entiremovementDorsiflexion will help deceleratethe lower leg as the athletesteps over the opposite kneeand the lower leg is travelingforward. This is accomplished byusing the gastrocnemius at theknee to assist in holding kneeflexion (allowing the hamstringsto assist the glutes at theinitiation of front side mechanics
    • Definition for our use: The full supported orunsupported revolution of one leg while maintainingposture in the upper body and plant leg.This can be executed with or without arm action.For our purposes in stage 1 we will not be adding armactionPutting Them Together – The FullMechanicAcademy of Exercise Science
    • What will training the full mechanic help me improve?Everything mentioned above for front side + backsidemechanicsCombining them in practice is more dynamic whichdemands greater feel of the desired limb positioningleading to improved coordination in the full cycle ofmovement.The Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Academy of Exercise ScienceSupported Full Mechanic
    • Coaching QueuesBegin with the leg in the ‘top position’ and complete thefront side mechanicMake ground contact with the ball of the foot andImmediately initiate the backside MechanicIt is essential to hold dorsiflexion the entire timeThe upper body should remain nearly completely stillTraining Supported Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceBegin with the leg inthe ‘top position’and complete thefront side mechanic
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceImmediatelyfollowed by thebackside mechanic
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceIt is essential to holddorsiflexion the entire time
    • Definition for our use: The unsupported application ofalternating cycles of the full mechanic required duringrunning, with emphasis on limb positioning during theair phases, ground contact location and conscioussignaling to the glutes during the ground contactphase.MarchingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • What will training Marching help me improve?Everything previously mentioned in a completelyunsupported format (like running itself) still allowingyou to develop an even more comprehensive feel forlimb position, hip and torso stability, and speed.Greater core (core – the coordination of musculaturebetween your neck and knees) demands to execute theleg movements while holding proper posture andstabilizing the trunk.MarchingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Academy of Exercise ScienceMarching
    • Coaching QueuesBegin with backside mechanicStep over the plant leg knee transitioning to front sidemechanicsComplete front side mechanic making contact with theball of the foot directly below the hipAs the ball of your foot makes contact with the groundimmediately alternate legsRemain tall and hold dorsiflexion throughout themovementTraining MarchingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceBegin with backsideMechanicNow that there is no wall touse for support muchgreater core demands arerequired to hold the properalignment
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceStep over the plant leg kneetransitioning to front SideMechanics
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceComplete front sidemechanic making contactwith the ball of the footdirectly below the hipMake sure the foot is being‘pulled’ back when it makescontact with the ground
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceAs the ball of your footmakes contact with theground immediatelyalternate legs
    • Coaching QueuesAcademy of Exercise ScienceRemain tall and hold dorsiflexion throughout themovement
    • Definition for our use: The coordinated mechanics ofrunning executed on a smaller level to feel the ball ofthe foot striking the ground under the center of masswhile the leg is moving in the positive direction(towards the back of the body)During ankling the participant should maintain hipand torso stability, the shoulders should naturallyrotate side-to-side slightly.AnklingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • What will training ankling help me improve?Ankling combines all previous training drills and allowsyou to apply them with the same limb movement speedas running and the same ankle responses as running.Ankling builds on top of the foundation developedduring all subsequent drills.AnklingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Academy of Exercise ScienceAnkling
    • Coaching Queueswith the feet together begin by moving one foot up and over theopposite ankleas the foot travels over the ankle pull back so the foot is travelingback as the ball of the foot makes contact with the groundground contact should occur directly below the hip this willreduce ground contact time which greatly improves performanceas soon as contact is made immediately begin the backsidemechanicIt should feel as though the bottom of the foot is being heldparallel to the ground throughout the movementmove at a constant speed similar to joggingTraining AnklingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesCoaching Queueswith the feet togetherbegin by moving one footup and over the oppositeankleAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesCoaching Queuesas the foot travels overthe ankle pull back so thefoot is traveling back asthe ball of the foot makescontact with the groundAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesCoaching Queuesground contact shouldoccur directly below thehip, this will reducedeceleration forces atground contact as well asreduce ground contacttime which greatlyimproves performanceAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Coaching QueuesCoaching Queuesas soon as contact is madeimmediately begin backsidemechanicsAnkling appears as thoughthe athlete is making circleswith their feet steppingover the anklesMove at a constant speedsimilar to joggingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • By adding the full leg mechanic during ankling youcan close the gap from the movements’ basicmechanical training closer to its application (running).Ankling and the Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise Science
    • What will training ankling + the full mechanic help meimprove?All the coordination processes of the lower body andtrunk necessary to maintain during runningIn stage 2 integration of arm action and advancementsin development of the proper reflexes will be the focusAnkling and the Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Training Ankling + Full Mechanic• Ankling – no arm action+ R leg full mechanic /singles (same for leftleg)Academy of Exercise Science
    • Training Ankling + Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise ScienceCoaching QueuesPerform ankling as described earlierWhen you feel comfortable add a full mechanicBegin by initiating the backside mechanic and followthrough the full mechanic as described in marchingComplete the front side mechanic and transition smoothlyback into ankling (refer to video)
    • Training Ankling + Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise ScienceBegin by initiating thebackside mechanicAs one foot is about tomake ground contact theopposite foot shouldquickly initiate thebackside mechanic
    • Training Ankling + Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise ScienceTransition from thetop of backsidemechanics to frontside mechanics
    • Training Ankling + Full MechanicAcademy of Exercise ScienceComplete thefront sidemechanic andtransitionsmoothly backinto ankling(refer to video)
    • Training Ankling + Full Mechanic• Ankling – no armaction + R leg fullmechanic / doubles(same for left leg)• When the right legmakes ground contactfollowing the first fullmechanic immediatelystart the second fullmechanicAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Training Ankling + Full Mechanic• Ankling – no arm action +full mechanic / alternates• The first time she passesin the video shows singlefull mechanic alternates(1 full mechanic witheach leg)• The second time shepasses in the videoshows double fullmechanic alternates (2full mechanics R legfollowed by 2 fullmechanics L leg)Academy of Exercise Science
    • Build-up RunTransitioning From Ankling to Running• Build ups• Build up from anklingto the full mechanics(running )• Don’t think about yourmechanics, instead,feel what you aredoingAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Build-up RunTransitioning From Ankling to RunningAcademy of Exercise ScienceCoaching QueuesPerform ankling at a constant speed similar to joggingBetween 5 – 10 meters begin to increase the height of ankling,stepping up and over the mid-calfBetween 15 – 20 meters increase the height of the full mechanicto stepping up and over the top of the calf (just below the knee)Between 25 – 30 meters apply the full stride, in other words, runforward and don’t think but feel the movementMaintain a constant speed in your leg movements (from anklingthrough the full mechanic)
    • Build-up RunTransitioning From Ankling to RunningAcademy of Exercise SciencePerform ankling at aconstant speed similar tojoggingBetween 5 – 10 metersbegin to increase theheight of ankling,stepping up and over themid-calf
    • Build-up RunTransitioning From Ankling to RunningAcademy of Exercise ScienceBetween 15 – 20 metersincrease the height of thefull mechanic to stepping upand over the top of the calf(just below the knee)
    • Build-up RunTransitioning From Ankling to RunningAcademy of Exercise ScienceBetween 25 – 30 metersapply the full stride (stepup and over the oppositeknee), in other words, runforward and don’t thinkbut feel the movementMaintain a constantspeed in your legmovements
    • Stage 1 training program: 2 days/week for 4 weeksthis can be done in any combination of days that work for youThis training does not replace your current conditioningregimen, add this to the beginning of your usual routine or asa separate training sessionBe patient, the improvement and use of any skill requirestime.2 days per week is minimum at first, 3 – 4 days per week isbest when beginning to learn a skill.Training programAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Day 1Supported front side mechanics (slow)3 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (slow)3 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics (slow)3 sets of 15 repetitions each legAnkling (technique development) (slow)10 times 20 yardsWall anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitions (5 second holds)Marching5 times 10 yardsSeated Arm Action (slow)3 sets 20 seconds (20 seconds rest)Week 1Academy of Exercise Science
    • Week 1Day 2Wall anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitions (5 second holds)Marching5 times 10 yardsSupported front side mechanics (slow)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported front side mechanics (medium)2 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (slow)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (medium)2 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics(medium)3 sets of 15 repetitions each legSeated Arm Action (slow)3 sets 20 seconds (20 seconds rest)Ankling (slow)times 20 yardsAnkling (medium)5 times 20 yardsAnkling + Full cycle singles right leg5 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)Ankling + Full cycle singles left leg5 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)Academy of Exercise Science
    • Week 2Day 1Supported front side mechanics (medium)2 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (medium)2 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics (medium)2 sets of 15 repetitions each legMarching3 times 10 yardsAnkling (medium)5 times 20 yardsAnkling + full cycle singles right leg2 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)Ankling + full cycle singles left leg2 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)compound set: supported full cycle mechanics 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed by Ankling +full cycle singles on the right leg.2 setscompound set: same as above for left leg.2 setscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed by Ankling +full cycle doubles right leg (3 times in 20 yards).2 sets.compound set: same as above for left leg.2 setsWall (or partner) anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitonsSeated Arm Action (slow)2 sets 20 seconds (20 seconds rest)Ankling to build up run3 times 100 metersAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Week 2Day 2Wall (or partner) anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitionsSupported front side mechanics (medium)2 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (medium)2 sets of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics (medium)2 sets of 15 repetitions each legSeated Arm Action (slow)1 set 30 secondsAnkling (medium)2 times 20 yardsMarching3 times 10 yardscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed byAnkling + full cycle singles on the right leg.2 setscompound set: same as above for left leg.2 setscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed byAnkling + full cycle doubles right leg (3 times in 20yards).2 sets.compound set: same as above for left leg.2 setsAnkling + full cycle mechanics alternates (on every3rd ankling)8 times 20 yardsAnkling to build up run4 times 100 metersAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Week 3Day 1Wall (or partner) anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitionsSupported front side mechanics (medium)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (medium)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics with arm action(medium)3 set of 15 repetitions each legAnkling (medium)2 times 20 yardsMarching2 times 10 yardsSeated Arm Action (slow)2 sets 30 seconds (20 seconds rest)compound set: Marching 10 yards immediatelyfollowed by ankling2 times 20 yards. 3 sets.compound set: supported full cycle mechanics withfull arm action 5 repetitions on right legimmediately followed by Ankling + full cycle singleson the right leg.2 setscompound set: same as above for left leg.2 setscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics withfull arm action 5 repetitions on right legimmediately followed by Ankling + full cycledoubles right leg (3 times in 20 yards).2 sets.compound set: same as above for left leg.2 setsAnkling + full cycle mechanics alternates with fullarm action (on every 3rd ankling)5 times 20 yardsAnkling + full cycle mechanics double alternates(on every 3rd ankling)5 times 20 yardsAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Week 3Day 2Supported front side mechanics (medium)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (medium)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics (medium)2 sets of 15 repetitions each legMarching3 times 10 yardsSeated arm action (medium)3 times 1 minuteAnkling (fast)5 times 20 yardsAnkling + full cycle singles with arm action rightleg2 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)Ankling + full cycle singles left leg with arm action2 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)compound set: supported full cycle mechanics 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed byAnkling + full cycle singles with arm action on theright leg.2 setscompound set: same as above for left leg.2 setscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed byAnkling + full cycle doubles right leg (3 times in 20yards). 2 sets.compound set: same as above for left leg.2 setsWall (or partner) anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitonsAnkling to build up run3 times 100 metersAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Week 4Day 1Supported front side mechanics (fast)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported back side mechanics (fast)1 set of 10 repetitions each legSupported full cycle mechanics (fast)2 sets of 15 repetitions each legMarching2 times 10 yardsAnkling (fast)3 times 20 yardscompound set: seated arm action medium (30seconds) immediately followed by Ankling + full cyclesingles with arm action right leg2 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)compound set: seated arm action medium (30seconds) Ankling + full cycle singles left leg with armaction2 times 20 yards (3-5 singles)compound set: supported full cycle mechanics with arm action 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed by Ankling + full cyclesingles with arm action on the right leg.2 setscompound set: same as above for left leg.2 setscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics with arm action 5repetitions on right leg immediately followed by Ankling + full cycledoubles right leg with arm action (3 times in 20 yards).2 sets.compound set: same as above for left leg.2 setscompound set: supported full cycle mechanics with arm action 5repetitions right leg then immediately do supported full cyclemechanics with arm action 5 repetitions left leg immediately followedby Ankling + alternates (1 ankling between full cycle alternates).Ankling to build up run3 times 100 metersWall (or partner) anterior tibialis raise2 sets of 10 repetitionsAcademy of Exercise Science
    • Week 4Day 2compound set: Supported front sidemechanics (1st half slow / 2nd half fast) 1set of 10 repetitions left leg immediatelyfollowed by Unsupported front sidemechanics left leg (medium) 1 set of 10repetitions immediately followed byAnkling + full cycle mechanics singles leftleg 2 times 20 yards (1 ankling betweenfull cycle mechanics).Same as above for right leg.seated arm action (medium)2 sets of 1 minuteRepeat number 1 for both legsMarching1 set of 10 yardsAnkling + full cycle alternates (1 anklingbetween alternates)4 times 20 yardscompound set: Unsupported back sidemechanics left leg (fast) 1 set of 10repetitions immediately followed byunsupported back side mechanics rightleg (fast) 1 set of 10 repetitionsimmediately followed by Ankling + fullcycle mechanics alternates withemphasis on arm action 2 times 40yardsrepeat for a total of 3 timesAnkling to build up run5 times 100 metersAcademy of Exercise Science
    • In the next program there will be a shift from lowerbody focus to more full body integrated training.Following lower body range of motion training instage 1, stage 2 will work on ‘up training’ importantreflexes for running efficiencyStage 2Academy of Exercise Science
    • Akima, Hiroshi., et al. Vastus lateralis fatigue alters recruitment of musculus quadriceps femoris in humans. Journal of AppliedPhysiology, 92(2), 679-684, 2002Assaiante, C., et al. Development of postural adjustment during gait initiation: kinematic and EMG analysis. Journal of MotorBehavior, 32 (3), 211-226, 2000Baechle, Thomas R., and Roger W. Earle. Essentials of strength training and conditioning. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL (2nd ed)2000Boden, Barry P., Griffin, Letha Y., and William E. Garrett. Etiology and prevention of non-contact ACL injury. The Physician andSports Medicine, 28(4): 2000Clark, Micheal A., Integrated training for the new millennium. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL 2003Cook, Gray. Athletic Body in Balance. Human Kinetics, Champaign, IL 2003Cromwell, Ronita L., Newton, Roberta A., and Les G. Carlton. Horizontal head stabilization during locomotor tasks. Journal ofMotor Behavior, 33(1): 49-58, 2001Enoka, Roger M., The pull in Olympic weightlifting. Medicine and Science in Sport, 11(2): 131-137, 1979Jacobs, R., and Ingen Schenau. Intermuscular coordination in a sprint push-off. Journal of Biomechanics, 25(9): 953-965, 1992ReferencesAcademy of Exercise Science
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