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Special Events Zero Waste (or darn close) - Bradley
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Special Events Zero Waste (or darn close) - Bradley

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  • 1. Special Events Zero Waste (or darn close) Athena Lee Bradley Northeast Recycling Council, Inc. www.nerc.org
  • 2. Why Zero Waste
    • Contributes to a cleaner event.
    • Enhances the event profile.
    • Benefit from advertising on the bins.
    • Supports the regional economy.
    • Reduce waste and disposal costs.
    • Saves natural resources & energy.
    • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Shows attendees it can be done.
  • 3. First Steps
    • Assign a coordinator or committee.
    • Work directly with event manager.
    • Identify the types of materials you expect to generate.
      • Largest volumes.
      • Most marketable.
    • Consider separating redeemable containers to offset recycling costs.
  • 4. Materials
    • Cardboard
    • Paper
    • Beverage containers
    • Food scraps and soiled paper
    • Woodwaste: pallets, wood scraps
    • Green waste
    • Manure
  • 5. Collection
    • Parallel system to event trash collection.
    • Consult garbage hauler, other haulers.
      • Determine the costs of contracting.
      • Containers? Type? How many?
      • Bargain for sponsorship exchange benefits.
    • Coordinate collection points/times.
    • Consult local government.
      • Containers? Hauling?
      • Drop-off at transfer station or recycling center?
      • Local hauling for free or for a small fee.
  • 6. Equipment
    • Recycling Bins
      • Curbside recycling bins (“blue bins”)
      • Wheeled carts
      • Regular trash receptacles
        • Retrofitted cover with hole
        • Lids - wood or cardboard
        • Art contest to decorate the containers
      • Different shape or color than trash cans
    • Compost collection containers
      • Buckets
      • Carts on wheels
  • 7. Equipment, cont.
    • Contractor trash bags & biodegradable bags (compost).
    • Litter pick-up sticks.
    • Good quality disposable gloves.
    • Hand washing area, sanitizing solution, wipes.
    • Wheeled cart, wheelbarrow, golf cart, etc.
  • 8.  
  • 9. Signage
    • Big, bright, easy-to-read
    • Top and sides
    • Simple - “Empty Beverage Containers ONLY”
    • Solicit sponsors for signage
    • Banners or flags
    • Consistent message
    • Samples on bins
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Zero Waste Stations
    • Convenient! Visible!
    • Next to all trash cans or in place of trash cans.
      • High traffic areas, including primary exits.
      • Vendor & concession areas.
    • Site plan -- visual map of stations.
    • “ Staging area” to store full bags until removed at end of day.
  • 13. Zero Waste Success
    • No trash cans, except at portapotties or restrooms.
    • Stations should be staffed
      • At least at stations with compost bins.
      • In highly frequented areas.
      • At highest attendance times.
    • Only biodegradable serviceware.
  • 14.  
  • 15. Set-up
    • If possible set up day before.
      • Stations in place.
      • Bags in containers.
      • Signs and banners in place.
    • Volunteer/Staff Training.
      • Review the logistics for the event.
      • Practice safety.
  • 16. Managing the Stations
    • Talk Trash.
    • Monitor the stations.
    • Keep them clean and neat.
    • Make sure signage/samples are still in place.
    • Remove full bags.
    • Collect cardboard from vendors.
  • 17. Clean Up
    • Volunteers to help after attendees & vendors leave.
    • Assign volunteers to specific event clean-up areas.
    • Systematically remove all bags designated areas.
      • Pick-up litter.
      • Set-up for next day (if event not over).
    • Count the number of trash, recycling, and compost bags (bins or boxes).
  • 18. Promotion
    • Website/social networks
    • Fliers/Posters
    • City/town publications
    • Newspaper ads
    • Press releases
    • Signage
    • Announcements from stage throughout event
  • 19.  
  • 20.  
  • 21. Working with Vendors/Concessionaires
    • Communicate early & often.
    • Information & what is expected.
    • Make recycling (composting) a required part of their contract.
    • Ask vendors what they plan on serving at the event.
      • Work with them on “no waste” options & least packaging ideas.
  • 22. Vendor Recycling
    • Ask or require vendors to sell beverages in recyclable containers only.
    • Remind vendors to breakdown cardboard and set it aside.
    • Provide recycling collection containers/collection system.
    • Monitor vendor compliance.
    • Prohibit Styrofoam and other nonrecyclable plastics.
    • Recognition of Greenest Vendors.
  • 23. Vendor Composting
    • Ask or require vendors to use paper and biodegradable serviceware.
    • Encourage vendors to avoid individual packages of condiments.
    • Provide composting collection containers/collection system.
    • Require vendors to collect their trash at booth.
    • Monitor vendor compliance.
  • 24. Garlic & Arts Festival
    • 2-day event
    • 12,000 attendees
    • ZeroWaste
    • Vendors required to use biodegradable or recyclable
    • Two bags of garbage
    • Solar power
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27. SolarFest
    • Three day event
    • 5000+ people
    • Zero Waste
    • Vendors required to use biodegradable or recyclable
    • Solar power
  • 28. SolarFest, cont.
    • 20, 65 gallon carts of food waste, soiled paper, and biodegradable plastics (1,400 pounds).
    • 800 pounds of recyclables — cardboard, glass bottles, plastic bottles, aluminum cans, aluminum foil.
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31. Sodexo – Rentschler Field
    • Club Area:  Approximately 675 people.
    • Luxury Suites (Skyboxes):  38 Luxury Suites, each holding up to 20 people.
    • Corporate Tents: Each game has 2 - 10 large tents sponsored by corporations or Alumni. 
    • Tents are 2 hours before the game and close when the game starts.
    • Press and Media Boxes.
  • 32.  
  • 33. More Examples
    • Lowell Folk Festival
      • 90% diversion: Composting & Recycling
    • Oregon State Fair
      • Converts an average 7,500 cubic yards of sawdust, straw & manure into compost
      • Vendors collect leftover grease to turn into biodiesel, an average of 2,800 gallons per fair.
      • Recycles beverage containers
  • 34. More Examples…
    • Maine Common Ground Country Fair
      • 51,000 people
      • 90% diversion
      • Next step: standardize biodegradable bowls, cups, plates, utensils.
    • The Delaware State Fair
      • 7,470 pounds of materials for recycling
  • 35.  
  • 36. Minnesota State Fair
    • Raising money to replace the standard light bulbs in the Grandstand marquis with high efficiency LED bulbs.
    • Eco Experience: interactive environmentally-focused exhibit.
    • 1.7 million people
    • 1,008 tons of solid waste
    • Recycled 3,508 tons of material
    • 38,000 can and plastic-bottle recycling receptacles
    • Most of the grease from the Fair is turned into biodiesel.
    • Fair recycles: paper, laser toner cartridges, glass, metal, fluorescent bulbs, vehicle and appliance batteries, antifreeze, beverage containers, automotive oil, tires, grease, meat scraps, manure compost, construction material, plastic shrink wrap, wood waste, paint, food waste, cardboard, concrete, oil filters, plastic bottles and more.
  • 37. Durham Fair - CT
    • 150,000 - 250,000 people
    • Four day event 
    • Partners with two different scout troops
    • Trash & recycling collection Litter patrol
    • Sorting recyclables
  • 38.  
  • 39. Ohio State Fair
    • 12-day Fair
    • Pilot - two tons of pre consumer food waste collected for composting
    • Two food service operations
    • Ranahan's Restaurant - 600 to 800 meals/day
    • Rhodes Center Cafeteria - 1,200 meals/day
    • 90-gallon wheeled trash carts
    • Every other day collection was adequate to minimize odors.
  • 40. More Examples…
    • Wisconsin State Fair
      • 72 bottled-shaped bins - plastic bottles & aluminum cans
    • Markham Fair
      • 75,000 attendees
      • Permanent Public Space Recycling Units
      • Goal: zero waste facility
    • Michigan State Fair
      • 4.5 tons of corrugated containers each year
  • 41.  
  • 42.
    • Athena Lee Bradley
    • Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.
    • 802.254.3636
    • [email_address]
    • www.nerc.org