EPR - Pledger

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  • 2 categoriesUphill battle
  • Before solution let’s go back to see how this situation developed
  • Not about behavior change.You’re frustrated because: -- packaging -- non-recyclable items -- things can’t be repairedAll things that can be addressed on a policy level
  • CA Prod. Stew. CouncilHelp start the councilRepresentatives from the cities and towns
  • EPR does not come out of the tax base—producers pay
  • EPR - Pledger

    1. 1. EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY<br />Lynne Pledger<br />lpledger@cleanwater.org<br /> Mass Recycle Conference, April 6, 2010<br />
    2. 2. OUR TRASH<br />OUR TRASH:1. organics (food, yard trimmings, soiled paper) 2. products and packaging<br />
    3. 3. 426,000 cell phones discarded daily.<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5.
    6. 6.
    7. 7. EXTENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY<br />* REQUIRES PRODUCERS TO PAY FOR DISCARD MANAGEMENT <br /> * GIVES PRODUCERS INCENTIVE TO REDESIGN THEIR PRODUCTS <br />
    8. 8. BRAND OWNERS PAYFor more drop-off locations or for use of municipal facilities <br />
    9. 9. PRODUCT COLLECTION PLANS<br /><ul><li> Must be approved by the state regulatory agency
    10. 10. May utilize retailers, local charities, local businesses, municipal infrastructure,</li></ul> or the mail—depending upon the producer’s business plan. <br />
    11. 11. PAYING FOR E-WASTE<br />HOLYOKE--$8,450 <br />WORCESTER--$25,000<br />BOSTON--$250,000<br />EPR would eliminate these costs<br />
    12. 12. Municipal waste was simpler then<br />Put into Garbage<br />Receptacles<br />Put into Ash<br />Receptacles<br />Kitchen or<br />Table Waste,<br />Vegetables,<br />Meats,<br />Fish,<br />Bones,<br />Fat.<br />Ashes, Sawdust,<br />Floor and<br />Street Sweepings,<br />Broken Glass,<br />Broken Crockery,<br />*Oyster and Clam<br />Shells,<br />Tin Cans.<br />CARD OF INSTRUCTION FOR HOUSEHOLDERS<br />Put into Rubbish<br />Bundles<br />Bottles, Paper,<br />Pasteboard, etc.<br />Rags, Mattresses,<br />Old Clothes, Old Shoes,<br />Leather and Leather Scrap,<br />Carpets, Tobacco Stems,<br />Straw and Excelsior,<br />(from households only)<br />The Sanitary Code requires householders and occupants to provide separate receptacles<br />for ashes and garbage and forbids mixing these in the same receptacle. <br />This law will be strictly enforced.<br />New York City – ca. 1905<br />
    13. 13. Waste has changed since 1900<br />1,213<br />387<br />1400<br />25<br />2000<br />1200<br />USA<br />955<br />1000<br />800<br />Inorganics<br />Biowaste<br />607<br />Pounds / Capita / Year<br />Products<br />600<br />358<br />400<br />187<br />200<br />92<br />14<br />0<br />1900<br />1960<br />NYC<br />USA<br />“Waste Generated”<br />
    14. 14. TRASH THEN (1900)... AND NOW (2010)<br />
    15. 15. Landfill<br />
    16. 16. Why do we have so much solid waste?<br />Why is solid waste so toxic?<br />Why aren’t all products repairable or recyclable?<br />15<br /> Questions<br />
    17. 17. One Answer<br /><ul><li>Brand-owners don’t pay for solid waste management.</li></li></ul><li>Products are disposable<br />Disposable and toxic <br />by design<br />
    18. 18. POLICY ACTION <br />
    19. 19. EXTENDENDED PRODUCER RESPONSIBILITY <br />Benefits of EPR:<br /><ul><li> Less waste, less disposal
    20. 20. Products redesigned to be more durable, </li></ul> recylable and less toxic <br /><ul><li> More jobs
    21. 21. Costs savings for local governments</li></li></ul><li>How can EPR support local business development <br />and the reduce, reuse, recycle hierarchy?<br /><ul><li>EPR bill language
    22. 22. Local stakeholder input on legislation and producer plans
    23. 23. Local government Product Stewardship Council advocacy</li></li></ul><li> PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP<br />Producers have the most responsibility because they design and market the products.<br />
    24. 24. DESIGNING WASTE AWAY<br />Example: a component redesigned to be cleaned can be reused instead of discarded.<br />
    25. 25. Package waste designed away<br />Boxed tubes in U.S. store<br />Unboxed tubes in Germany<br />
    26. 26. MORE LOCAL JOBS<br />Example from state of Washington: Goodwill Industries has been able to hire more people since EPR for electronics has been implemented. <br />
    27. 27.
    28. 28. EPR is the law in 30 countries<br /><ul><li>European Union requires Take Back for motor vehicles and electronic waste (WEEE directive)
    29. 29. EPR for packaging is the law in 30 countries – 24 European, 3 Asian, Australia, Peru & Quebec.
    30. 30. 21 states require Electronics Take Back
    31. 31. Canada has over 30 national & provincial take back programs.</li></ul>26<br />
    32. 32. FRAMEWORK EPR<br />Will allow the DEP to add additional <br />product categories to a statewide EPR<br />program.<br />DEP will work with other states in the Northeast to develop harmonious bill language for Framework EPR in the region.<br />
    33. 33. EPR actions for local governments<br />
    34. 34. Start a Massachusetts Product Stewardship Council<br />
    35. 35. © 2009 Product Policy Institute<br />British Columbia<br />Nova Scotia<br />Midwest<br />Northwest<br />VT<br />Washington<br />New York<br />Oregon<br />CT<br />California<br />Texas<br />Hawaii<br />~Local Government Product Stewardship Councils<br />September 2009<br />30<br />30<br /> © 2009 Product Policy Institute<br />
    36. 36. Three of our neighbors have already formed Councils<br />
    37. 37. A statewide Product Stewardship CouncilMassachusetts cities and towns, speaking with one voice<br />
    38. 38. MA Product Stewardship Council meeting<br /> Contact lpledger@cleanwater.org for pdf<br />

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