Fort Point Channel A Photographic Tour And an Opportunity For Using Oysters to Restore the Environment  The Massachusetts ...
The Fort Point Channel is a Uniquely Attractive and Interesting Site for Oyster Restoration <ul><li>The Channel is an encl...
Fort Point Channel <ul><li>A remnant of a wonderful wetland </li></ul><ul><li>A piece of our industrial heritage </li></ul...
How did it get this way? It started as a bay/inlet among wet lands. Then the industrialization began…  Fill to build out t...
This view shows the growing industry on the West Side and the complete fan pier.
How did it get this way? It started as a bay/inlet among wet lands. Then the industrialization began…  Fill to build out t...
Fort Point Channel A Photographic Tour From start to Harbor
On May 23 our volunteers surveyed the channel at low tide.  <ul><li>We tested for salinity </li></ul><ul><li>We measured b...
The start <ul><li>Initial flows from Roxbury Conduit, Dorchester Brook Conduit </li></ul><ul><li>Drainage from Boston, Sou...
The first section <ul><li>Stony banks </li></ul><ul><li>Mud Flats </li></ul><ul><li>Green Water  </li></ul>East Bank West ...
Bridge 1Broadway Bridge <ul><li>Activation plan calls for kayak launch and urban wild. </li></ul>
Bridge 2- Unidentified <ul><li>Narrow foot bridge </li></ul><ul><li>Takes walkers from East side to closed in area on West...
Bridge 3 MBTA Railroad <ul><li>Substantial wide bridge with cement piers </li></ul>
Space Between Bridge 3 and 4 <ul><li>Cobble on East Bank </li></ul><ul><li>Wall on West Bank </li></ul>Traffic Barrel
Bridge 4 Dorchester Avenue <ul><li>Extensive pilings at North End beneath building  </li></ul>
Seawall Basin <ul><li>A vast expanse of open water  </li></ul><ul><li>With unique opportunities for oysters </li></ul><ul>...
Gillette Plant <ul><li>Uses 30 million gallons of water per day for cooling. </li></ul><ul><li>Discharges warm water (Coul...
Cobbled Area With Pilings <ul><li>Located behind Post Office </li></ul><ul><li>Could be an area for raising oysters.  </li...
Existing Dockage Opportunity <ul><li>Could be fixed up and used as platform for hanging o ysters and education </li></ul><...
Bridge 5 Summer Street
<ul><li>Hard Bottom </li></ul><ul><li>Hard to access </li></ul><ul><li>Signs of existing shellfish. </li></ul>Cobble Oppor...
Bridge 6 Congress Street <ul><li>Carries foot and car traffic to Boston Children’s Museum. </li></ul>
Channel Hub <ul><li>There are numerous resources for educational tie-ins. </li></ul><ul><li>Boston Children’s Museum </li>...
Bridge 7- Evelyn Moakley <ul><li>Wide </li></ul><ul><li>16 foot clearance </li></ul><ul><li>Ample sidewalks  </li></ul><ul...
Bridge 8 Northern Avenue <ul><li>Disrepair </li></ul><ul><li>Closed to traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Hut would make terrific b...
Fan Pier Marina can accommodate an upweller. <ul><li>The location is protected. </li></ul><ul><li>The location is highly v...
What will the future of Fort Point Channel be? Special thanks to: Friends of the Fort Point Channel www. friends of fortpo...
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Boston's Fort Point Channel- A Photographic Tour

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Photographic survey and map based history of the Fort Point Channel in Boston Harbor compiled by the Massachusetts Oyster Project. www.massoyster.org

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Boston's Fort Point Channel- A Photographic Tour

  1. 1. Fort Point Channel A Photographic Tour And an Opportunity For Using Oysters to Restore the Environment The Massachusetts Oyster Project for Clean Water An oyster filters 30 gallons of water per day.
  2. 2. The Fort Point Channel is a Uniquely Attractive and Interesting Site for Oyster Restoration <ul><li>The Channel is an enclosed, shallow water body with limited access and numerous areas that could be interesting for raising oysters. </li></ul><ul><li>The water is slightly brackish ranging from 27 to 22 parts per million in our low tide testing. </li></ul><ul><li>Water quality is a problem with numerous urban surface water inflows. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a strong community desire to utilize this resource. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Fort Point Channel <ul><li>A remnant of a wonderful wetland </li></ul><ul><li>A piece of our industrial heritage </li></ul><ul><li>A once working canal </li></ul><ul><li>An opportunity </li></ul>
  4. 4. How did it get this way? It started as a bay/inlet among wet lands. Then the industrialization began… Fill to build out the leather district Fill to widen the Boston Neck Dredging to create more dockage And the Channel became narrower and the bay it led to smaller
  5. 5. This view shows the growing industry on the West Side and the complete fan pier.
  6. 6. How did it get this way? It started as a bay/inlet among wet lands. Then the industrialization began… Fill to build out the leather district Fill to widen the Boston Neck Dredging to create more dockage And the Channel became narrower and the bay it led to smaller And it became more industrial. Then with upstream fill for the rail-system to replace the docks we wind up with the sliver for water movement we have left today.
  7. 7. Fort Point Channel A Photographic Tour From start to Harbor
  8. 8. On May 23 our volunteers surveyed the channel at low tide. <ul><li>We tested for salinity </li></ul><ul><li>We measured bottom silt </li></ul><ul><li>We found many attractive opportunities for water cleansing oysters and to involve the Fort Point Channel Community. </li></ul><ul><li>We see multiple opportunities for education and involving the arts community. </li></ul>
  9. 9. The start <ul><li>Initial flows from Roxbury Conduit, Dorchester Brook Conduit </li></ul><ul><li>Drainage from Boston, South Boston, Roxbury and Dorchester. </li></ul><ul><li>Box culvert is CSO 070 </li></ul>
  10. 10. The first section <ul><li>Stony banks </li></ul><ul><li>Mud Flats </li></ul><ul><li>Green Water </li></ul>East Bank West Bank Shopping carts
  11. 11. Bridge 1Broadway Bridge <ul><li>Activation plan calls for kayak launch and urban wild. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Bridge 2- Unidentified <ul><li>Narrow foot bridge </li></ul><ul><li>Takes walkers from East side to closed in area on West Bank that is closed in by highway. </li></ul><ul><li>Cobbles on both east and west banks </li></ul>
  13. 13. Bridge 3 MBTA Railroad <ul><li>Substantial wide bridge with cement piers </li></ul>
  14. 14. Space Between Bridge 3 and 4 <ul><li>Cobble on East Bank </li></ul><ul><li>Wall on West Bank </li></ul>Traffic Barrel
  15. 15. Bridge 4 Dorchester Avenue <ul><li>Extensive pilings at North End beneath building </li></ul>
  16. 16. Seawall Basin <ul><li>A vast expanse of open water </li></ul><ul><li>With unique opportunities for oysters </li></ul><ul><li>Eventual site for a boat launch </li></ul>West Bank Post Office East Bank Gillette Plant
  17. 17. Gillette Plant <ul><li>Uses 30 million gallons of water per day for cooling. </li></ul><ul><li>Discharges warm water (Could it keep properly placed oyster colonies growing year round? Is their food?) </li></ul>
  18. 18. Cobbled Area With Pilings <ul><li>Located behind Post Office </li></ul><ul><li>Could be an area for raising oysters. </li></ul><ul><li>Across the channel from a drainage outlet. They are numerous throughout the channel. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Existing Dockage Opportunity <ul><li>Could be fixed up and used as platform for hanging o ysters and education </li></ul><ul><li>Structure needs some attention. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Bridge 5 Summer Street
  21. 21. <ul><li>Hard Bottom </li></ul><ul><li>Hard to access </li></ul><ul><li>Signs of existing shellfish. </li></ul>Cobble Opportunity Live Mussel Clam Shell
  22. 22. Bridge 6 Congress Street <ul><li>Carries foot and car traffic to Boston Children’s Museum. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Channel Hub <ul><li>There are numerous resources for educational tie-ins. </li></ul><ul><li>Boston Children’s Museum </li></ul><ul><li>Barking Crab </li></ul><ul><li>Hooks lobster </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy foot traffic </li></ul>
  24. 24. Bridge 7- Evelyn Moakley <ul><li>Wide </li></ul><ul><li>16 foot clearance </li></ul><ul><li>Ample sidewalks </li></ul><ul><li>Low clearance at high tide. Restricts access to the Channel </li></ul>
  25. 25. Bridge 8 Northern Avenue <ul><li>Disrepair </li></ul><ul><li>Closed to traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Hut would make terrific bar </li></ul><ul><li>Pilings create lots of opportunity for structures to support oysters. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Fan Pier Marina can accommodate an upweller. <ul><li>The location is protected. </li></ul><ul><li>The location is highly visible. </li></ul>
  27. 27. What will the future of Fort Point Channel be? Special thanks to: Friends of the Fort Point Channel www. friends of fortpointchannel .org/ Boat Captain Dave Wolfe
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