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    Lexington Finance Training Lexington Finance Training Presentation Transcript

    • Massachusetts Republican Party Campaign Finance School WELCOME The Hon. Peter G. Torkildsen, Chairman
    • Itinerary
      • Overview of Fundraising  
      • Major Donors
      • Candidate Calls
      • Direct Mail and data base management
      • Lunch break 
      • Events
      • Group projects/ presentations
      • OCPF presentation
      • Close, distribute and collect surveys
    • Massachusetts Republican Party Campaign Finance School Overview
    • Finance Plan
      • Your finance plan should be written AFTER you write your campaign plan
      • How much will your campaign plan (which detail HOW your candidate will get 50% plus 1 votes) cost?
      • How much will it cost to raise that much money?
      • Add together the cost of your campaign plan, plus the cost of fundraising to calculate the total amount your campaign must raise
    • Finance Plan
      • Your finance plan should consist of four parts:
      • Summary – List fundraising programs
      • Narrative – a detailed description of each program
      • Calendar – event dates, literature drops and deadlines. Included with your calendar is your cash flow. When do you need to raise specific amounts of money by? How much do you expect to raise from each mailing, event, and telephone solicitation session?
      • Job Descriptions – should be written for each member of fundraising team – even though most or all will be volunteer
    • Finance Committee
      • Appoint a Finance Committee that will be responsible for planning and orchestrating a successful fundraising plan.
      • The head of your Finance Committee should be:
        • an individual with a high profile in the community
        • Organized
        • has the ability to implement the finance plan and solicit donors.
    • Why People Give
      • Party – Even in Massachusetts, there are a few die-hards that support Republicans just for being Republican – you need to find them
      • Access - Challengers don’t have it in all but the rarest circumstances
      • Ideology – Strong believers in conservative principles or fearful of liberal agenda
      • Peer Influence – People who know and like you, or know and like the person who will be asking for a contribution
    • How do I get donors to give me money?
      • ASK THEM!
      • Regardless of how the request is made, remember to convey three things to all donors:
      • Urgency: A donation is needed as soon as possible
      • Specificity: Outline how the Committee spends its money. It is important to demonstrate that the committee has its spending priorities in place
      • Electability: Tell them why you can win if you have the proper funding
    • Donor Groups One Size Does Not Fit All
      • Friends and Family
      • Ideologues
        • Major Donors
        • Direct Mail Donors
      • Clubs/Committees
      • PACs
    • Where Do I Find Potential Donors? Friends and Family
      • The Rolodex Strategy:
      • Groups where you will have the most success:
      • Family, colleagues and friends
      • Business Associates
      • Social Clubs
      • Country Clubs
      • Church
      • Vendors (if applicable)
      • College Alumni Lists
    • Where Do I Find Potential Donors? Ideologues
      • Previous donors to Republican candidates, PACs, and causes
      • Note: Committees can legally obtain lists of donors to Massachusetts state candidates and committees at the Office of Campaign and Political Finance www.state.ma.us/ocpf
      • Professional Organization Member lists (AMA, Chambers, NFIB, NRA)
      • Petition Signers (Tax Rollback, Marriage Amendment, Local Petitions)
      • Voter Vault!
    • Successful Solicitation of Major Donors:
      • Sell Yourself!
      • Be optimistic, sincere and excited about the campaign
      • An investment in a better future based on his/her values & ideals
      • Be Flexible. Close the deal when you sense the person is ready
      • Look at the situation from the potential donor’s point of view
      • Communicate on their level
      • Tell them how the money will be used
      • Ask for names of other people who might be interested in involvement
    • Major Donors
      • Make these donors a part of your campaign
      • Keep them informed of your progress and activities
      • Solicit their input throughout the campaign
      • These donors can help you expand your rolodex network
      • More on this from Vincent Errichetti later today
    • Fundraising Letters
      • Who Should be Mailed?
        • List of local active donors compiled by the Committee
        • Acquired lists
        • Registered Republicans in your community
        • Targeted groups – use VoterVault for this
      • Who Should Sign It?
        • Candidate
        • Local Republican elected official
      • Content
        • Why are you running?
        • What is planned for the coming election cycle?
        • Urgent PS:
      • Watch your spelling/grammar!
      • More on Direct Mail later from Peter Torkildsen
    • Events
      • Special events
        • Raise money
        • Increase awareness
        • Build excitement
      • Establish a realistic target figure to be raised (after expenses) and work backward from there.
      • Secure a speaker for your event
      • Where possible, look to utilize donated space and resources.
      • More on this later from Lyndsay Jones
    • Groups and PACs
      • Solicit Donations From:
        • Town Committees
        • Like Minded Political Action Committees (PACS) i.e. NFIB, NRA, GOAL, CLT
      • Approach these groups as you would Major Donors
    • DO NOT:
      • Over-sympathize with your prospect. Never begin with, “I know it’s a lot to ask, but…” because if you say that, then it does become a lot to ask!
      • Leave without a firm commitment or a check in hand.
    • Campaign Finance Rules
      • The Massachusetts Office of Campaign & Political Finance (OCPF) is the body that regulates your committee’s financial activities.
      • They exist to assist Party committees, PACs, and candidates in adhering to the finance laws that the legislature enacts.
      • Resources are readily available for you to stay in compliance with campaign finance laws.
      • Visit their website at: www.state.ma.us/ocpf for more details.
    • Some Quick Points:
      • Government employees may neither solicit donations, nor may their name ever appear on an invitation for a fundraising event - not even if donations are merely “suggested.”
      • A donor may contribute up to $500 to a local (state) candidate committee per calendar year.
      • You must report the name and address of every contributor whose annual contributions are more then $50.
      • You must report the employer & occupation for every contributor whose annual contributions are more then $200.
      • More on this later today, when a representative of OCPF will make a presentation
      • Candidates for federal office have different rules and limits
    • Don’t Forget VOTER VAULT!!
    • High Dollar Fundraising Methodology
      • By Vincent Errichetti
    • I. Who Donates
      • 3 Types of Donors
      • 1. Friends and Family who can give higher
      • 2. Ideological who can give higher
      • 3. Access donors who can give higher
    • II. Finding Donors
      • Three Main Sources for Donors
        • Known Donors, (non federal lists) www.mass.gov/ocpf
        • Your Rolodex
        • Businesses, Associations and friends of friends
    • III. Making the Sell
      • You must Convey 3 concepts:
        • 1. Urgency of Giving
        • Larger givers giving early make budget planning easier.
        • The earlier you raise more, momentum will follow.
        • Early high givers can be asked to be Finance Members.
    • III. Making the Sell
      • You must Convey 3 concepts:
        • 2. Specificity of what you will spend on.
        • High dollar givers want to see tangibles.
        • Literature, mail, sign locations number, etc
        • AVOID MENTIONING INTANGABLES.
        • Consultants, advisors, etc.
    • III. Making the Sell
      • You must Ask and Convey 3 concepts:
        • 3. Electability
        • That you can win. (Polling, media etc.)
        • That you are doing the right things .
        • - Working with winners they donated to
        • - Doors knocked
        • - Funds raised, endorsements, free media.
    • IV. Psychology of Asking
      • Why Do People Give? 1. To get access to elected officials. 2. Ego - it makes them feel good. 3. Belief in the candidate or the Republican Party. 4. Fear of the consequences of not giving. 5. To reward candidates or the Republican Party for past performance. 6. Peer pressure. WHO ASKS MATTERS! 7. Friendship for a candidate or committee member. 8. To effect public policy. (This is the reason most people give) 9. Party loyalty. 10. They were asked. (This is the most important reason!)
      • * WHO YOU ARE RUNNING AGAINST!
    • IV. Psychology of Asking cont.
      • 3 Things to Ask of All Potential Donors 1. Ask for their vote if in the district. 2. Ask for a monetary contribution be specific! 3. Ask for the name of another donor.
      • Why Don’t People Give? 1. They feel exploited. 2. The appeal is too vague. 3. The appeal is unrealistic. 4. The appeal came from the wrong person. 5. The campaign is not perceived as viable. 6. They were not asked! (This is the most important reason!)
    • V. Ways to ask.
      • 1. Candidate Phone Calls
        • A. Most effective for cost and results
        • B. Most research required
        • C. Must be done at all levels
        • D. Should be done as a follow up (more contacts)
        • NOTE: Most high dollar donors will ONLY give if they get a call from the candidate.
    • V. Ways to ask. Cont.
      • 2. Finance Committee
      • * It is illegal to have Government employee raise money
        • Ask people who donate and are in organizations.
        • Ask people to raise a specific amounts.
        • House parties are ok, but they do the prep work but get their list of invitees. (usually lower dollar events)
        • If they want access to a notable guest for a fundraiser, get them access only if they meet their goals.
    • V. Ways to ask. Cont.
      • 3. Special Events
        • MUST be done 2 tier if you have a person of note.
        • Keep overhead DOWN
        • Need not be at a venue that you must rent.
        • Need not be the Governor. Political briefings by Republican leader, Conservative Figureheads etc.
        • Ask every potential celeb you can, worst they can say is no.
        • Don’t hesitate to work with other town committees, campaigns etc.
        • Host committee sells tickets, drives people in.
        • No freeloaders.
    • V. Ways to ask. Cont.
      • 4. Direct Mail Prospect (same aspect for high dollar)
        • Must have letter asking, reply envelope and a reply card.
        • 3 concepts, formal ask, ps, who signs.
        • Prospect twice before ignoring.
        • Must make follow up phone calls.
    • V. Ways to ask. Cont.
      • 4. Direct Mail Prospect (different aspects for high dollar)
        • Must have additional promotional items.
        • Should use nicer stationary or reply devices.
        • Size of the piece should not be standard #10.
        • Personalization should be emphasized more.
        • Positive media added.
        • Think of this as an investment portfolio.
    • V. Ways to ask. Cont.
      • 4. Direct Mail Re Solicitation and extended
        • Done to donors, new names and non-donors again.
        • Done to building a relationship, a dialogue.
        • Endorsement fundraising letters, especially if it is someone the donor has given to in the past.
        • Send urgent cash-my opponent is attacking me with lies lies lies. (Issue specific works best.)
        • Letter from spouse or parent
    • Sample 1
      • 450 people solicited cost $990.00
      • 147 Individuals gave between 3.8.04 and 6.30.04 
      • Total of $25,965
      • 18 $500 givers
      • 22 $250 givers
    • Sample 2
      • 40 Individuals solicited
      • Cost was $80.00
      • 9 Individuals gave
      • Total of $3,200 raised
    • Candidate Calls
    • Why Calls?
      • The candidate is the most effective fundraiser in any successful campaign
      • You can reach far more people calling than visiting in person
      • If you start early enough , and are an unknown, visiting in person for large contributions is a good strategy. The candidate still needs to be calling people who can’t max out, but can still give a good size donation
      • The phone is your best fundraising tool
    • Preparation
      • Target calls (Call biggest donors 1 st )
      • Put together call sheet
      • SCHEDULE CALL TIME!
      • STICK TO THE CALL TIME!
    • Information to Include:
      • Name
      • Salutation
      • Home ‘Phone
      • Work ‘Phone
      • Address
      • Email
      • Last Contribution (if applicable)
      • Employer/Occupation if possible
      • Assistant’s name
      • Spouse’s name
      • How you know them/met them/ what the link is
      • What was your last contact with them, if any
    • Information to Include
      • Spouse’s name
      • How you know them/met them/ what the link is
      • What was your last contact with them, if any
      • If possible, check that the phone numbers are correct PRIOR to call time
      • In general, for a local race, call people you know at home, people you don’t know at work. Eventually you will learn when to vary this
    • Calls
      • Candidate makes the actual calls
      • Your pitch will follow your direct mail
        • Who you are
        • Who recommended you call (if any)
        • Why you are running
        • Why you need their contribution (what you will spend it on, i.e. postage, etc.)
        • When you need it (Today! Events and filing deadlines are also good reasons for people to give right away.)
        • How to make the donation
    • Calls – Record Keeping
      • Keep detailed records of your calls on Excel or similar database
        • Date and time you called
        • Did you reach someone?
          • If no, the date you left the voicemail will determine how soon you should call back
          • If yes, what did they talk about
            • If a prospect is offering to talk about an issue, a candidate that she likes/ dislikes, etc., you want to know that anytime you call in the future. Unless you have a perfect memory, you will need to write it down!
    • Call Follow Up
      • Always send a letter in follow up
      • Be specific about the amount of the pledge made (if any) and enclose a reply envelope
      • When a large check comes in, follow up with a phone call
      • All donors, large and small, always get a thank you letter ASAP after the contribution
      • Thank you letters are not only polite, but will help when you go back and ask for an additional contribution
    • Direct Mail & Database Management
    • Overview of Direct Mail
      • Direct Mail, done well, will accomplish many things:
        • It will pay for the outreach to thousands or tens of thousands of targeted voters
        • It will bring your campaign in a steady supply of low dollar donations
        • It Will bring in net income to your campaign
        • It Will inform your supporters of what is happening in your campaign
    • Prospecting Mail v. Fundraising Mail
      • Prospecting Mail is anytime you send direct mail to someone who has never given your candidate a contribution before
      • If you don’t prospect, your list will never grow
      • If you prospect following certain well established criteria in Prospecting Mail , you will either break even, or make a small net amount
    • Prospecting Mail v. Fundraising Mail
      • Fundraising Mail is anytime you send direct mail to someone who has previously donated to you – also called re-solicitation.
      • Because the universe you mail to is much smaller than a prospecting list, your net is much higher
      • Fundraising Mail will contribute to the bottom line of your campaign
      • Prospecting Mail is necessary in order to have a successful Fundraising Mail program
      • Both can and should be done online
    • Prospecting Mail
      • Basics of Prospecting Mail
        • Give the answer to:
          • Who you are
          • Why you are running
        • By definition of prospecting, these people do not know your candidate – you need to tell them
        • Bio should include community, family, employment, military service, past elective office, and/or education
    • Why are you Running?
    • Prospecting Mail
      • Basics of Prospecting Mail (cont’)
        • Why you are running
          • Local/ State/ National Issue
          • Something the incumbent did, but shouldn’t have
          • Something the incumbent didn’t do, but should have
          • Something the party in power did, etc.
        • Your reason for running should be succinct in both your direct mail, and your stump speech
    • Fundraising Mail
      • Fundraising mail is when you are asking for a contribution from someone who has already given to you.
      • You don’t need an intro or bio, as they already know enough of your bio to have donated to you
      • You may want to mention again why you are running, especially for those issue donors
    • Fundraising Mail
      • You need to go back to your last letter, and find out why you asked for money last time.
        • If it was to pay for postage, tell them how successful the mail you sent out was.
        • If it was for advertising, tell them how your advertising campaign increased your name identification by XX points, or some other real, identifiable measure
      • Whatever it was, it is important that you follow up, so people know you actually spent the money the way you said you would, and put it to good use
    • Fundraising Mail
      • Tell them how your campaign is going now
        • This is the “update” part of fundraising mail, so you are constantly telling your supporters of the milestones you are completing on the campaign trail
          • Tell them how many doors the candidate has knocked, how many lit drops, etc.
        • This is important, as it demonstrates your campaign’s progress, beyond just how much money you have raised.
    • Fundraising Mail
      • From this point, tell them what the next step in the campaign is, and why you need to ask them for another contribution
      • In your letter, it should flow, just like you are telling them a step by step story on how you will be successful
    • Common aspects to Prospecting Mail and Fundraising Mail
      • Personalize the letter whenever possible
      • You can do this with campaign software, such as “Campaign Manager” or “Aristotle” or “Back Office”
      • You can also easily do smaller campaigns (selectman, state rep) with Excel
      • Either way, the more personal your letter, the better response (both in donations and total amount received) you will get
      • A “Dear Jim” letter will always produce a greater return than a “Dear Friend” letter, but a “Dear Friend” letter is better than no letter at all
    • Say No to Junk Mail
    • Common aspects to Prospecting Mail and Fundraising Mail
      • Try to avoid making your letter look like “junk mail”
      • Use a “live” stamp instead of a printed indicia whenever possible. Even when mailing Prospecting Mail at the bulk rate, use the bulk stamp instead
      • Print the address directly on the mailing envelope instead of a label
      • If you have lots of volunteers who can’t go door to door or make phone calls, have them personally address your fundraising letters
      • These steps are more work, but they produce better returns
    • Common aspects to Prospecting Mail and Fundraising Mail
      • As part of personalizing your letter, ask for specific amounts. If you don’t know a donor’s history of giving, use lines like, “Donations of all amounts are needed, whether $25, $50, $100, or perhaps even $250 or $500”
      • If you know the donor’s history, and they usually send $50, then ask for “$50, $100, or $250”
      • Don’t ask for an amount that is less than they normally give
      • The amounts suggested on your response device should match the amounts you suggested in your letter
    • Common aspects to Prospecting Mail and Fundraising Mail
      • Tell them why you need it
        • Mention specific items like printing, postage, advertising, headquarters rent
        • Do Not mention things like consultants or salaries
      • Tell them when you need it (Today!)
        • You need a sense of urgency in your direct mail – without it, your response drops
    • Common aspects to Prospecting Mail and Fundraising Mail
      • Tell them how to donate
        • In the enclosed return addressed envelope (Always enclose a return envelope!)
        • On line
      • Include an urgent P.S. after the signature
      • Some people will read the letter, others will just skim it, read the ask, and the P.S. – Make sure you have one that makes them understand how important their support is
    • Fundraising Mail – How Often?
      • Mailing to your known donors should occur at least every 4 weeks
      • Don’t worry about nagging your supporters – the ones who want to give will, and the others wont
      • When your list gets large enough, you can hire a direct mail house/ firm
      • To start, it is much more economical to have your campaign do your direct mail
      • Most fundraising mail will result in about a 10% response rate, so you will be missing out on a large amount of money by not doing Fundraising Mail, and by not doing it frequently enough
    • Prospecting Mail – Who to Target?
      • When Prospecting, think in terms of letters to be signed by the candidate, and letters to be signed by others
      • By the candidate
        • Known donors in your district
        • Registered Republicans in your district
          • If you don’t have the money to prospect every R right away, start with the most active R’s as found in Voter Vault.
    • Prospecting Mail – Who to Target?
      • By the candidate (continued)
        • Independent voters who have voted in Republican primaries (also from Voter Vault)
        • Voters identified by microtargetting as likely R’s
        • Voters identified as agreeing with one or more issues of the candidate, in Voter Vault
    • Prospecting Mail – Who to Target?
      • By Others
        • If you can, have an incumbent Republican sign a letter to her own list, asking for support
          • While incumbents may not do this, as they have to ask for money for their own campaign, recently retired or unopposed Republican might
          • with the most active R’s as found in Voter Vault.
        • Recently retired Rotary, Kiwanis, or other civic group leaders will also be effective signing a letter to their members
        • School alumni
        • Trade associations (R.E., law, medicine, etc.)
    • Direct Email Fundraising Issues
      • Build your email list with donors, volunteers, and people looking for information about your campaign
      • Whether Prospecting or Fundraising, you should be sending pure newsletters between solicitations
      • When asking for donations, follow the outlines for either Prospecting or Fundraising
    • Direct Email Issues
      • Give people the option of donating immediately online, or sending in a check
        • Remember, it is their choice. If you do not give them a choice, you are hurting your response rate
      • Always give people the ability to “opt out” of future mailings, if that is there choice. No Spam allowed.
      • People like McCain, Paul, Obama and others have raised millions in a single day. Internet donations will only increase for all candidates in the future.
    • Direct Email Issues
      • Everything is going on line!
    • Final Thought
      • Watch your spelling and grammar!
    •  
    •  
    • EVENTS
    • EVENTS
    • Events
      • Special events
        • Raise money
        • Increase awareness
        • Build excitement
      • Establish a realistic target figure to be raised (after expenses) and work backward from there.
      • Secure a speaker for your event
    • Spreading the Word
      • Mail invitations
      • Email
      • Website
      • Always follow up with phone calls
    • Points to Note:
      • Include a reply device/envelope
      • DISCLAIMERS
      • Proof read!
      • Event code to track progress
      • Turnaround time
    • Points to Note:
      • Where possible, look to utilize donated space and resources
      • The best location is at a supporter’s home!
    • If Renting Space:
      • Make sure to get a SMALL room
      • Negotiate!
      • Don’t forget extras (microphone, etc)
      • Don’t go overboard!!!
      • Food and Drink considerations
    • Points to Note:
      • It’s all about NET dollars
      • Hosts?
    • Group Projects
    • Office of Campaign and Political Finance Gregory Birne
    • Massachusetts Republican Party Campaign Finance School Thank you Please complete the survey before you leave