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Building and Creating Great IT Teams

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A simple and concise approach to get you started building your team

A simple and concise approach to get you started building your team

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  • I think you will all agree - the success of a team starts with an effective leader. An effective team leader has a variety of traits and characteristics that encourage team members to follow him. Team leaders naturally possess certain qualities, such as compassion and integrity, or learn leadership skills through formal training and experience. The qualities of an effective team leader inspire the trust and respect of the team and stimulate production within the workplace.Characteristics of an Effective Leader from Success Factors: Communication - Organization - Effective team leaders possess exceptional organizational skills. Organizational skills help team leaders plan objectives and strategies, which allow team members to perform optimally. Organized team leaders put systems in place that maintain order and guide team members toward meeting company goals and objectives.Confidence - An effective team leader is confident in his abilities, as well as confident in the abilities of his team members. A confident leader is secure in the decisions he makes that affect his team. A self-confident team leader also reassures team members of his authority within the organization.Respectful - A quality team leader is respectful of his team members. A respectful leader empowers employees by encouraging them to offer ideas about decisions that affect them. This lets team members know that the leader respects their input and opinions.Fair - A quality team leader treats team members fairly. He is consistent with rewards and recognition, as well as disciplinary action. A fair leader ensures all employees receive the same treatment.Integrity - An effective team leader is honest and open with his team members. Leaders who possess integrity gain the trust of team members because he does what he says he will do and treats others the same way he wants to be treated.Influential - Influential leaders help inspire the commitment of team members to meet company goals and objectives. Influential leaders also help manage change in the workplace by gaining the confidence of workers through effective decision making and communication.Delegation - Effective team leaders know how to share leadership through delegation. Delegating certain tasks to trustworthy team members allows the leader to focus on improving workplace functions and production.Facilitator - Effective team leaders are powerful facilitators. As a facilitator, team leaders help workers understand their goals. They also help organize an action plan to ensure team members meet their goals and objectives more efficiently.Negotiation - Team leaders utilize negotiation skills to achieve results and reach an understanding in the event of a workplace conflict. Team leaders who negotiate effectively streamline the decision-making process, as well as solve problems for the best interest of everyone involved
  • Leadership Teams Example: IT Leadership TeamsOften described as standing teamsObjectives generally to run an organization or a businessWork Teams Example: IT Department teams People who work close together to reach specific goals – sales teams, production teams, delivery teams, etc…Sometimes members of work teams are high interdependent, sometimes do little more than coordinate activities - what always matters is that the individual does their job well with the overall goal of the team in mindCross Function Teams Example: IT Change Management team Bringing together diverse sets of skills to focus and work together towards a common goal Project Teams Example: Portfolio Project teamComing together to deliver a solution or service Operates for a specific period or time depending on complexity of task
  • The right team members is directly related to the requirements for meeting the goal. The key is to identify the capabilities needed and the number of resources needed. Here is where leadership and management come back to play. Assuring the right can-do attitude and refusing to tolerate bad behavior is paramount to the success of the team.

Transcript

  • 1. Building & Creating Great IT Teams START WITH THE GOAL IN MIND…AND THAN MOVING ON TO SLAYING DRAGONS AND MOVING RUBBER TREE PLANTS. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com
  • 2. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 2 Getting started What do you hope to get out of this discussion? 1st Participant Poll: Who has experienced being a member of a sport team? Do you remember what it felt like to win? What did it take to win the game? This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 2
  • 3. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 3 Together Everyone Accomplishes More You build a team to accomplish things that no one person can accomplish by himself or herself Teams = Teamwork Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishment toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.” -ANDREW CARNEGIE Take note: If a task or deliverable CAN be accomplished by an individual DO NOT FORCE IT INTO A TEAM STRUCTURE TEAM
  • 4. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 4 Where can a TEAM exist? Anywhere. • Centralized teams are easier, there is no substitute for face to face conversations • Global teams are more and more common, they can be just as effective with a little more work • Establish early on team communication structure • Meeting/Conference call schedule and structure • Collaboration tools such as e-mail, Lync, Sharepoint • Decision making processes Note: Success Measurements: Don’t forget to plan performance indicators both for central and remote team members!
  • 5. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 5 Keep the goal in mind as you define the structure …COMMITTEE? ◦ …TASK FORCE? …WORK TEAM? ARE YOU BUILDING A… WHY DOES IT MATTER ? Team structure drives action and behavior expectations
  • 6. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 6 Committee  Most formal of work groups  Persons appointed to perform a function on behalf of a larger group  Operates under organizational by-laws or statutes  Typically comprised of individuals representing broad points of views  Most often “peer” relationship based
  • 7. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 7 Task Force  Created on an “as needed” basis  Typically comprised of experts in specific area of knowledge or expertise  Brought together for a specific objective  Expectation that the work group will disband when objective is met
  • 8. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 8 Work Team  Linked together for a common purpose  Can be project or operational based  Complementary and often diverse skills  Mutually accountable for team output  Operates under a set of common ground rules
  • 9. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 9 Getting Started – Clarity of Purpose • Team purpose – sometimes referred to as its “charter” or “mission” • Questions to ask: • What is the objective • What key issues will the team address • What will be the key activities? • What are the parameters and authority of the team members • What are the teams key deliverables • What is the timing of those key deliverables? • What is the team governance model, how are issues resolved or escalated? • Most important – What does success look like? Clarity of purpose provides team focus
  • 10. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 10 Team Success Factors Right Leadership Right Governance Aka Operating Rules Right Team Structure
  • 11. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 11 Defining the team – start with the leader Characteristics of an Effective Leader *:  Communication  Organization  Confidence  Respectful  Fair  Integrity  Influential  Delegation  Facilitator  Negotiation (*as taken from Lominger’s Success Factors) A Dragon Slayer A leader with the management capability to build the right team, assume accountability for the risk and the courage to move aside the challenges. You won’t see this characteristic on the job description – even if it is critical to success.
  • 12. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 12 Team Structure Types Work Teams Examples: • Departmental Function Teams • Portfolio Governance Team • Center of Excellence Teams Leadership Teams Examples: • Board of Directors • Business Executive Teams • IT Leadership Teams Cross Function Teams Examples: • IT Change Management • Strategy Development • Disaster Recovery Team Project Teams Examples: • Portfolio Project Team • Task Forces • Fun Event Team Team Types
  • 13. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 13 “RIGHT” Team Members
  • 14. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 14 Project/Program Management Team Governance Example • Overall Program/Project Ownership • Business Need • Business Case • Benefit Tracking & Reporting • Individual Time commitment as required • Work Plan Development • Cost Quantification • Day-to-day Management • Facilitate: Detailed Technical Requirements Technical Architecture System Configuration System Testing Systems Documentation Technical Training • Business Requirements • Benefit Development • Project initiation • Bus Functionality Testing Rqmts (Use Case Scenarios) • Acceptance Sign-off • Business Process Change Management • Functional User Training • Issue Resolution • Execution Ownership • Project Oversight IT PMO Consolidated Program Reporting - Risk assessment - IT Governance Oversight - Drive Process Definition Joint Responsibility • Status Reporting • Project Deliverables • Outcomes Executive Program Sponsor Program Steering Committee Business Process Owner IT Project Manager Business and IT Project Team Members
  • 15. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 15 Mary’s Top 10 Team Leadership Lessons 1. ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS lead by example, demonstrate accountability and accept no less from team members 2. Align team goals to strategic direction 3. Build team with intelligence, manage with courage 4. Articulate individual contribution importance and show appreciation sincerely and often 5. Privately and respectfully address discretions, forgive but do not show tolerance of repeat offenses 6. Celebrate team success 7. Dissect misses for lessons learned and than move on 9. Introduce a Team Song: Example: “High Hopes” 8. Make it personal make it real, make it fun 10. Declare a Team Mantra and have the courage to live by it Example: “Failure is not an option”
  • 16. This material is available for non-commercial or educational use by permission of it’s owner ITeffectivity, LLC - Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com– Page 16 Expectation Recap and Discussion For more conversations with Mary visit her at http://iteffectivity.com/blog/ Phone: 772-646-0706