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Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
Leadership in Administration Case 12
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Leadership in Administration Case 12

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This presentation was done in conjunca case study on the complicated decision making process of one high school principal. The decision

This presentation was done in conjunca case study on the complicated decision making process of one high school principal. The decision

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  • 1. To Dispose or not to Dispose?Mary JohnsonED 542 Leadership in School AdministrationCase #12<br />
  • 2. Where?<br />A small high school located in a rural community is suffering the effects of a more than 100 year old school building. The facility has a pleasant outer appearance but the infrastructure is failing, most recently the heating system.<br />
  • 3. What?<br />After the failure of the main boiler, the backup system is utilized. It has been more than five years since its last operation, and the same amount of time has passed since the tank it draws its heating oil from was used. <br />This storage tank is a major concern of the building engineer. There are several potential problems including moisture contamination resulting in corrosion, leakage leaching into the surrounding soil and beyond, and also health effects that could impact the school population and town residents.<br />
  • 4. Who?<br />There are several involved parties but most are secondary. <br />The immediate decision maker is the Principal under the supervisionof the Superintendent.<br />The building engineer and potential tank inspection company are involved with the guidance and final decisions <br />of the principal.<br />Consideration must be given to the students,faculty, and town residents, especially those in closest proximity to the <br />school building.<br />
  • 5. Why?<br />There is urgency in dealing with this problem. Obviously, any health concerns are first and foremost. No one should be put at risk.<br />Costs associated with the repair and possible disposal of the oil tank equal that of the intended investment to renovate two science labs within the school. The funds are available but come with a sacrifice, in this case, the education of the students. <br />
  • 6. The Potential Solutions…<br />What Tank?<br />Let’s Play the Waiting Game.<br />We need to Start from Scratch.<br />
  • 7. Solution #1: What Tank?<br />Turn a blind eye and ignore any and all of the potential problems that might be down the road. You need to:<br />Rescind your approval of the tank inspection-you don’t want anyone to discover what could be considered a monumental problem.<br />Continue to run the back up boiler until the main boiler is repaired.<br />Once the main boiler is repaired, shut down the back up boiler and consider its removal. <br />Forget about the tank outside. “It’s best to let sleeping dogs lie.”<br />
  • 8. Solution #1: PROS and CONS<br />+ The money from the capital improvement budget can be used for the two science lab renovations- students and faculty will voice their approval.<br />+ No money will be wasted on a problem that you didn’t create.<br />- The ethical and moral ramifications could cost more than your career-it could cost someone’s life.<br />- The problem is still there and will likely rear its ugly head again sooner rather than later.<br />
  • 9. Solution #2: Play the Waiting Game<br />Hold off in making any major decisions until things can be assessed. You need to:<br />Continue repairs on the main boiler.<br />As soon as possible, switch back to the main boiler and discontinue use of the back up boiler and tank.<br />Regardless of the tank inspection results, once it is no longer needed, hire a technician to inspect the tank for leaks. If none appear, have sludge pumped out and then fill the tank with sand. If leaks are discovered, begin the process of soil and tank removal.<br />
  • 10. Solution #2: PROS and CONS<br />+The safety of all parties involved is guaranteed: staff, students, and town residents.<br />+ There is continued use of existing systems thus saving money.<br />-Money will be needed for the pumping, cleaning, and filling of the tank.<br />- Renovation of TWO science labs might not be possible-the students and staff might need to settle for one. <br />- Both boilers are old and this main boiler will likely need to be replaced/serviced soon.<br />
  • 11. Solution #3: Start from Scratch<br />Start fresh. Instead of blaming those that came before you, do something now. You need to: <br />Use the funds in the capital improvement budget to: <br />Remove both boiler systems.<br />Remove the entire tank and surrounding soil.<br />Purchase a brand new heating system that is environmentally and financially efficient for the school.<br />
  • 12. Solution #3: PROS and CONS<br />+ Most immediate fix with long term effectiveness.<br />+ There will be no money wasted in fixing old boilers or inspecting an old tank. Money will be used efficiently.<br />+ Safest decision for all parties involved: staff, students, and town residents.<br />- By far, most expensive.<br />- Will use all (if not more than) available funds from the capital improvement budget.<br />- The science lab renovations will be put on hold for now and perhapsyears to come.<br />- Other renovations may be put on hold if additional funds are needed.<br />
  • 13. My Solution…<br />#2<br />The safety of my school population and the town residents is the MOST important focus in a decision of this magnitude.<br />
  • 14. My Reasoning…<br />By fixing the main system immediately, I ensure that money is well spent for a direct solution. <br />The oil tank is a hazard that will never go away. Once it is no longer being used, it must be inspected. If it can be filled with sand, this will be by far the cheaper of the two solutions. If the soil surrounding it has been compromised, then it will need to be removed adding to the expense. <br />With both options involving action, additional money will be needed thus making renovation of TWO science labs unlikely. However, it may be considered a scientific opportunity in itself. By bringing in a waste management company, as well as technicians and inspection specialists, students may be able to benefit from on-site education thus bringing the classroom outside.<br />
  • 15. Things for consideration…<br />Both boilers are old and this main boiler will likely need to be replaced/serviced.<br />Small districts might not be eligible for environmental grants to remove the storage tank, but all districts can apply for educational grants. I would encourage my staff and students to apply for such opportunities.<br />I would also make the town aware of the ethical and honest decision that was made by the school with safety at the core of its thinking. Perhaps fundraising could be employed to raise the funds needed to complete the science lab renovations.<br />

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