Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Get the Most Out of  Twitter at a Convention
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Get the Most Out of Twitter at a Convention

1,344

Published on

How to follow Twitter even without an account. How to create an account. How to tweet and participate in a conversation. How to use Storify or Evernote to save tweets. How to use Hootsuite to set …

How to follow Twitter even without an account. How to create an account. How to tweet and participate in a conversation. How to use Storify or Evernote to save tweets. How to use Hootsuite to set up a conference dashboard.

Published in: Career, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,344
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Get the Most Out of Twitter at a Convention Using These Free Tools: Evernote, IFTT & Hootsuite Mary K.D. D’Rozario MSCR, MBA, CCRP, RAC, CCRA mary.drozario@crplink.com @marydrozario marydrozario marykddrozario 29 Sep 2013 v. 4 update 10 Feb 2015
  • 2. Did you know that most conventions have a conversation that co-exists on Twitter? Questions, further discussion, bringing in followers and experts from all over the world, this is what happens on Twitter. This slide deck will show you how you can become a part of that conversation. Or, you can watch the conversation, even if you do not have a Twitter account.
  • 3. What, I can follow Twitter without an account?! Yes. All you need is the hashtag for the event. Go to http://www.twitter.com/#YOURHASHTAGHERE You will be able to see the discussion from your event.
  • 4. Wow, that is so cool! I was overwhelmed thinking about creating a Twitter account. The slides in this deck build one at a time. If you feel overwhelmed STOP READING. Just do the things up until where you got overwhelmed. You can do more later. Right now, you only need to do one thing: Find out the hashtag for your conference.
  • 5. Hashtags Aren’t Only for Twitter! That’s right, you may also be able to find the hashtag being used on Facebook, Google+ & Instagram. Remember, you will only be able to see posts that you have permission to see (posts from friends, or people who are making public posts). So check your other social platforms and see if your conference has a conversation going on there too!
  • 6. Use Twitter Without a Twitter Account
  • 7. Wow, these are some great tweets! What if I want to share them with my boss back home? Method 1: Storify.com Save your tweets onto a web page. Even add comments. The program lets you search for tweets by typing in the hashtag. Tweets get buried into history fast, so grab them the same day!
  • 8. More on Storify… You do not need a Twitter account to save tweets into Storify. Here is a Storify I created to save a set of my own tweets on resources for social media: http://storify.com/marydrozario/social-media- resources
  • 9. You Need a Twitter Account for This…
  • 10. I don’t want to make my page public, and even Storify “private” stories are not secure. Method 2: Email Tweets to Yourself Best to have aTwitter account to do this.* This slidedeck discusses three tools that make emailing & sending your Tweets more awesome:  Evernote.com  IFTT.com  Hootsuite.com *You can copy/paste from your web browser, but who has time for that?
  • 11. How do I email a Tweet? Click “more” and select “Share via email”
  • 12. Okay, I am ready to play! How do I create an account? Go to http://www.twitter.com and create your log in. If you can’t think of a great name, don’t worry, you can change it later. Tip: a good Twitter handle is SHORT. Twitter makes you select some accounts to follow when you open your account. They offer you some random choices- you can change this later.
  • 13. I’m on Twitter! I want to tell the whole world! Write your Twitter handle on your conference name tag: @JaneSmith Before the conference, tell others you will be on Twitter and give them the hashtag.  LinkedIn  Conference social area, if there is one  Facebook
  • 14. I don’t want my account to be totally lame. Go into the settings and add a picture in the “profile” section. Otherwise you will be an egg. Don’t be a lame egg. If you don’t have a picture available, just use free clip art. You can be a dragon fly: http://www.dragonfly-site.com/free-dragonfly-clip- art.html
  • 15. My employer says I have to put in a disclaimer. Your employer may have a social media policy. Check your HR manual. The policy may require you to say that you do not represent the company. It may provide the exact words to use or it may be more general. On the web browser (not the app) click on your user name on the left. On the next page, there will be an “Edit Profile” box on the right. Under your user name on the left, there is a box where you can write something like “Opinions expressed are my own and do not represent my employer.”
  • 16. People are following me. Should I follow them? Look at the feed of the person who followed you- do they post things you are interested in? Then follow them. This one rule will usually keep you away from spammers and other bad people. But people told me I should follow everyone who follows me- it’s polite. No- you don’t have to talk to strangers and you don’t have to follow everyone who follows you.
  • 17. We’re tweeting now!
  • 18. I want to send my first Tweet! It is easy, just click in the box to “compose new tweet.” Notice that the bottom of the box shows you how many characters you have left.
  • 19. I have followers from back home! How do I show them the tweets from the conference? Don’t re-tweet every tweet- it will just clutter up the conference stream with your name over and over. Not good manners! Instead, write a tweet like this: At the Burger Joints conference by @burgergalactic. Check out the tweets by following #awesomeburgers. Re-tweet a few selected best tweets to keep up interest.
  • 20. How do I re-tweet??? Method One: On web, click here: On phone app, click here: On the web, you will get a second pop-up confirming the re-tweet.
  • 21. How do I re-tweet??? Method Two: Warning: The next slide is sort of complicated. This is way easier if you get a Hootsuite.com account (described later in this deck) or use the mobile Twitter app.
  • 22. How do I re-tweet??? Method Two (on the web): Copy and paste this into your tweeting box. You get this: @HarvardBiz 37m Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomq1U Add the following to show it is a re-tweet (RT and :) and take out the time: RT @HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomg1U Hit “Tweet”.
  • 23. How do I re-tweet??? Method Two (on the app): You can use that. Or take out the quotes and the user name at the end, and put at the beginning: RT @HarvardBiz: You get: RT @HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomg1U This is the old-fashioned look and is how Hootsuite will format your re- tweets. “RT” means “Re-tweet.” Click here “@HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomq1U” You get this:
  • 24. How do I re-tweet with a comment? People usually add a comment at the beginning, like this: Neat link! RT @HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomg1U If your comment is before the “RT” people know it is you. You can also write your comment outside the quotes on either end, like this: “@HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomg1U” Neat link!
  • 25. I just need a couple more letters for my comment You can do a modified tweet (MT). For example, the word “innovation” is really long: Neat link! RT @HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innovation Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomg1U If you shorten to “Innov.” and show the tweet has been changed by using “MT: you have more letters: Really neat link! MT @HarvardBiz: Should You Back That Innov. Proposal? http://s.hbr.org/1aomg1U
  • 26. I am ready to write a tweet- the speaker said something interesting and no one else tweeted it! Because you only have 140 characters, you probably want to write TWO tweets. Tweets #1: Identify your speaker. I am listening to Linda Smith of North University at the #awesomeburgers.” Tweet #2: Give the info. (Use quote marks if it is an exact quote.) Burgers solve every disease possible says LS at #awesomeburgers.
  • 27. Being Awesome on Twitter
  • 28. But I want my tweets to be more awesome than that! When you identify someone, take a second to link some info about them.  official bio  LinkedIn profile  Twitter handle! When you quote them, you might be able to find a source to link.  An article they wrote  Is the slide on Slideshare or other places on the internet?  The original source of the information (study, news article…)
  • 29. Nah, other people get NOTICED at conventions. How can I do that? Join the conversation before the convention starts. Tweet value. Example: At a large conference, I saved a clip of a map of all the Starbucks shops near the conference center and sent it on Twitter. Tweet fun. Example: Start a treasure hunt to find out how many different brands of candy the vendors are giving out. Tweet context. Example: Provide links to information that goes beyond what is being presented at the conference.
  • 30. I don’t want to be a bore though. What are some guidelines for good manners? If few people are tweeting, go to town- you are creating value. Sending more than a tweet every three minutes (20/hr) might be excessive though. As more people tweet, dial it back. Look for unique (no one else tweeted it) and higher value.
  • 31. Any more tips on manners? Give other people credit- re-tweet their best tweets, or start a conversation. If people re-tweet you, find a way to thank or interact with them.  Send these kind of extra tweets during lulls or in the evening.  Don’t use the hashtag (it will just clutter the hashtag feed). Don’t argue on Twitter- it is just too hard in 140 characters. Bring lively discussions back into the face- to-face conference. Trolls: Just ignore them. If you don’t answer them, most people who follow you won’t see them – it’s like they don’t exist. For the worst trolls, Twitter has a “block” feature.
  • 32. But I heard something really juicy! Plus I’m awesome with the snappy comeback! Everyone can see your tweets. There are always people with an agenda against your industry and they are watching. Consider two or three times whether you want to post something that would put your industry in a bad light. Always think about how people outside your industry will view your tweet.
  • 33. I’m still worried about my employer not wanting me to represent them. Unless you do represent your company on social media, keep it personal and general about your overall work experience. Obviously you cannot share anything that is under a confidentiality agreement. You shouldn’t share anything your employers would like to be confidential or make it seem like you are speaking on behalf of your company or about your company’s policies and procedures. YES: “In my experience…” NO: “At my company…” “On my current project…”
  • 34. After the Conference
  • 35. The conference is over. Now what do I do? If this was a professional conference, you now have a professional identity on Twitter. Less than 1 in 1000 people on Twitter post unique value, and one of those special people is you! Keep in touch by posting something at least once a week. Just three posts a day can put you into rockstar Twitter status. (I provide coaching to help you develop a strategy for your rockstar status.)
  • 36. What should I NOT do after the conference? Start blathering about your personal life. Keep it professional! Post controversial material. Your colleagues and boss still need to like you, and your clients needs to be able to be associated with you in public.
  • 37. There is cool stuff on Twitter about my hobbies though… If you want to start playing in other areas of Twitter, create a personal account for that, but remember that nothing on the internet is ever private. Only very special rockstars can have a combo professional/other stuff account. You are not that special- keep your professional image focused.
  • 38. Tools: Evernote, IFTT & Hootsuite
  • 39. Now that I have a Twitter account, why is Evernote.com awesome? • It is free! • You can email stuff into the account.  Email tweets to create a searchable library of tweets that caught your eye.  Email anything else you want to save. • Emailing to yourself works especially well on mobile devices. (Great for conferences!)
  • 40. How can IFTT make Evernote even more awesome? IFTT (pronounced like “gift” without the “g”) stands for IF This Then That. IFTT.com is a website that allows you to create formulas (called recipes) that automate saving your tweets. Other people have already created most of the recipes you would want, so you can just search and copy. For example, you can use a recipe that saves a tweet to Evernote when you click the “favorite” button on the tweet.
  • 41. You also said I should get a HootSuite.com account. Why? • You can write something once and post it to Twitter AND to Facebook and LinkedIn. • You can create a conference dashboard on your mobile device… it’s really just the first step to world domination. (More on this later.) • Again, FREE! • You can add comments when you email tweets.
  • 42. Set up your HootSuite.com account. Open an account at http://www.hootsuite.com. Link your Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Decide where you want to set up your conference dashboard. The dashboard does not copy between the places you set it up. If you are going to use the iPhone app at the conference, set up your dashboard on the iPhone app.
  • 43. Set up your HootSuite.com dashboard. All of the apps look a little different, but the instructions are very similar. On the app, click on the house on the upper left to see your streams. Click “edit”. Click “add stream.” (On the website, there is an “add stream” button in the upper left. You may need to select your Twitter handle at the top of the box.)
  • 44. How adding HootSuite.com streams looks on the computer:
  • 45. How adding HootSuite.com streams looks on the iPad app:
  • 46. Set up your HootSuite.com dashboard. If any of the “Feed” streams are not showing… On the app: Select them one at a time and select “save.” On the website: Click the “+ Add Stream” button.
  • 47. Set up your HootSuite.com dashboard. Now click on “Search”. Type in the hashtag for the conference. On the app- click “save.” On the computer- click “Add Stream.” You will now have a column where you can follow the hashtag for the conference.
  • 48. For Speakers and Vendors
  • 49. For the Speaker: Put your slides on the internet. Slideshare.net is a great place. On your opening slide, provide links for the audience:  Link to the slides  Link to the bio you would like them to use.  Your Twitter handle. Bonus: Write your own Tweets. Use Hootsuite.com to time them to post while you are speaking.
  • 50. For the Vendor Twitter is the new vendor mini candy. What can you do to make a conference more fun? What can you do to add value? Have your materials available in smartphone / tablet viewing friendly form. Tip: Instead of a whitepaper, think slideshare.net Start participating in the hashtag stream before the conference.
  • 51. What can CRP do for your social media? Strategy Execution Key Personnel Engagement Social Media Policy Employee Training
  • 52. Background on Clinical Research Performance, Inc. CRP was founded by Mary D’Rozario in 2012. Mary has more than a decade of experience in the clinical research industry and is Regulatory Affairs Certified, the highest certification in FDA regulation. We provide social media and content marketing strategy and execution, primarily in health care and the life sciences. Our clients are recognized as leading social media influencers in their fields.
  • 53. Strategy What channels should you be using? Who is your target viewer on that channel and what do you want them to get out of the interaction? What method are you going to use to track ROI from your social media efforts? We can help you work through asking and answering these questions.
  • 54. Execution Once you have a strategy, you will need micro and blogging content which is aligned with that strategy. We work with you to create content that has you “voice.” Content creation is a team effort. You will also need to monitor and respond on your social media channels. Because CRP is staffed to monitor all day, you only have to pay for a fraction of our monitoring time. Outsourcing monitoring and response saves you hassle & money!
  • 55. Key Personnel Engagement You are a solopreneur or everyone is telling your CEO that she has to be visible on social media. But who has the time? Key personnel social media engagement requires a team approach. A social media strategist and mentor can help keep the team going the right direction. Check out this post from the Harvard Business Review: http://blogs.hbr.org/2009/11/10-tips-for-getting-your-ceo- on-twitter/
  • 56. Social Media Policies & Employee Training Every day, company confidential information, including HIPAA protected patient information, is posted to the internet. Many people think that “digital natives” know how to use social media. In reality, they have likely received zero social media training in school or college. Your employees want and need clear expectations and guidance in the form of a comprehensive social media policy. They also need training to avoid the most common pitfalls on social media.
  • 57. Questions Ask on Twitter @marydrozario Email mary.drozario@crplink.com Schedule a free telephone consult at http://www.meetme.so/marydrozario
  • 58. Copyright notice from Mary K.D. D’Rozario: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. What does that mean? You may share this slide deck in its entirety with anyone for free. Splitting up the deck or charging for the copies is out of bounds. The original slide deck can be found at http://www.slideshare.net/marydrozario

×