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Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]
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Economical importance of bryophyte [autosaved]

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  • Hi, hopefully you'll read this quickly enough... Where did you get the reference for your slide 6 stating 'Peat has been considered a possible material for filtering water for reuse in space travel. It could be cultivated so that fully used peat could be replaced by new growth. Although it is capable of growing only a few centimeters per month, its tremendous absorptive abilities may compensate for this slow growth limitation'...
    It is very important and very urgent for me to have this answer if you have any, please. Thank you so much for that.
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  • 1. Economical Importance OfBryophyte By: MARYAM SHAKEEL
  • 2. Bryophytes are used in a variety of industrial applications. Different species of mosses are used as furniture stuffing, as soil conditioner, as cushioning, and as material used to absorb oil after spills.
  • 3. Most economically important bryophyte is Peat moss SPHAGNUM.it has specialised hyaline cells to store water.so its used as storage material and also as absorbent.
  • 4. Polytrichum juniperinum is tall moss that holds soil in place, looks like a small tree in a dish garden, and is strong enough to make brooms, baskets, and door mats.
  • 5. Treatment of WasteBryophytes show great promise for cleaning up toxic waste. Peat mosses (Sphagnum) are even more suitable than other kinds of mosses.
  • 6. Peat has been considered a possible material for filtering water for reuse in space travel.It could be cultivated so that fully used peat could be replaced by new growth. Although it is capable of growing only a few centimeters per month, its tremendous absorptive abilities may compensate for this slow growth limitation.
  • 7. Decorative horticultural uses include making baskets and covering flower pots and containers for floral arrangements , and one company advertises a birch-bark pedestal topped by a moss globe.
  • 8. Nurserymen typically use wet Sphagnum for shipping live plants. A lesser known use of Sphagnum in horticulture is that of burning it to produce a smoke screen against frost.
  • 9. V. R. Timmer (1970) contended that mosses accumulate potassium, magnesium, and calcium from rainfall, but that they do not compete for phosphorus in soil. These trapped nutrients may then be released slowly from mosses to soil. When mosses become dry, their cell membranes suffer damage, so when the moss is rehydrated, it becomes leaky. It generally takes about a day to repair this damage, and during that time, the moss can leak its more soluble contents (e.g., potassium), thus providing some of these nutrients to plant roots during early stages of rainfall
  • 10. Bryophytes used as fuels:Nearly half the world’s annual peat production is used for fuel, with peat resources worldwide estimated to be equivalent to 100–200 million tons of oil, or about half the known gas reserves (United Nations 1981).In Canada, there appears to be more energy in native peat deposits than in forests and natural gas reserves.
  • 11. Peat mosses are best suited for the production of methane, and peat is likely to become an important source of fuel for production of heat, methane, or electricity in the future. Peat has rapid regeneration, can be easily harvested, has low sulfur content, and its heating value is superior to that of wood.
  • 12. Bryophytes are used in pharmaceutical products, in horticulture ,for household purposes, and are also ecologically important. Uses and applications of the bryophyte flora are being increasingly recognized around the world. Their potential in the biomapping of atmospheric precipitation is also enormous.
  • 13. House Construction:In parts of the globe where woody plants are scarce and bryophytes common, these tiny plants are used in the construction of houses and their furnishings. At Kapkot in the Himalayas, villagers use moss mats with shrubs, grasses, and bamboo to make a pharki, a kind of door placed at the openings of their temporary huts.
  • 14.  Sphagnum peat has been developed as a new construction material through the use of binders for solidification and strengthening, resulting in new products like ‘peatcrete’.
  • 15. Household Uses: Mosses have been used for decorative purposes in Japan, England, France, Finland and America. Ornamental water flowers are made from dried plants of Climacium japonicum and sold in Japan. Probably the most useful household moss is Sphagnum, largely because of its absorbent property and as an insulator.
  • 16. Mosses are woven into mats and sold in many parts of India. In the alpine highlands of the Northwest Himalayas, Indians make bedding, mattresses, cushions and pillows by stuffing mosses into coarse linen sacks or by spreading them on the muddy floor.The Himalayans also use mosses as insect repellents when storing food.
  • 17.  Local mosses and liverworts are dried, made into a coarse powder that is sprinkled over grains and other goods to be stored in containers. Several insect anti-feedants have now been found in diverse bryophytes, making this group of plants a useful source of insecticides and insect repellents.
  • 18. Medicinal Uses:The Chinese and the native Americans have used various moss species like Philonotis, Bryum, Mnium, crushed into a kind of paste and applied as a poultice.
  • 19. In India, the burned ash of mosses mixed with fat and honey is used as an ointment for cuts, burns and wounds in the Himalayan region.The liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is also used as a medicine for boils and abscesses, perhaps because the young archegoniophore resembles a boil when it first emerges from the thallus.
  • 20. Bryophytes are also use for Decorativepurposes:
  • 21. Thank You

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