Large Research Facilities  Business opportunities from Large Research Facilities  UK industrial and research capability se...
2 Large Research FacilitiesThe number of Large ResearchFacilities, commonly referred to as“Research Infrastructures”, has ...
Preface 3 ContentsPREFACE                                                          SECTION CAbout this publication	       ...
4 Large Research Facilities About this publicationThe aim of this publication is to make      This publication is divided ...
Preface 5ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS                         UKTI would like to thank all the organisations for their contributions  ...
6 Large Research Facilities Foreword                                                        Visible and Infrared Survey Te...
Preface 7                                                                                             “ he UK supports som...
8 Large Research Facilities UKTI                              UK TRADE  INVESTMENT                              UK Trade  ...
Preface 9UKTI supports a wide range of Britishbusinesses through events and specialistworkshopsInvestment                 ...
10 Large Research Facilities“ he diversity of Large Research Facilities around the T world is truly astonishing, ranging f...
Section A – Large Research Facilities 11Section ALarge ResearchFacilities
12 Large Research Facilities     Large Research FacilitiesAerial view of Diamond Synchrotron. (Image courtesy of Diamond L...
Section A – Large Research Facilities 13Table 1.1:  elected examples of LRFs – UK national facility, intergovernmental and...
14 Large Research Facilitiesworthwhile ones to pursue. For example,              When planning the next generation of     ...
Section A – Large Research Facilities 15Many LRFs, such as Diamond Light Source, CERN and ITER,are also prominent national...
16 Large Research Facilities“ ndustry is vital in keeping I CERN’s research facilities running, supplying us with everythi...
Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 17Winning businessfrom LargeResearch Facilities
18 Large Research Facilities Winning business from Large Research Facilities                                              ...
Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 19For further information on the RCUK and ESFRI roadmaps pleas...
20 Large Research FacilitiesTable 2.1Factors to consider when identifying and applyingfor business opportunities from LRFs...
Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 21Table 2.1 continued Theme                Area(s)            ...
22 Large Research FacilitiesTable 2.2: Winning LRF contracts – how UKTI can help                                          ...
Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 23                 “ uilding the world’s best                 ...
24 Large Research Facilities
Section B – UK capability in selected technology areas 25Section BUK capabilityin selectedtechnology areas            “ e ...
26 Large Research Facilities UK capability in selected technology areasTable 3.1: Selected examples of UK organisations po...
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies
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UKTI's promotion of the UK's Large Research Facilities and Supporting Technologies

  1. 1. Large Research Facilities Business opportunities from Large Research Facilities UK industrial and research capability serving the worldwww.ukti.gov.uk
  2. 2. 2 Large Research FacilitiesThe number of Large ResearchFacilities, commonly referred to as“Research Infrastructures”, has risensharply in the last few decadesboth in Europe and further afield.Many of these facilities undertakecutting-edge, and increasinglyinternational, scientific research.Crucially, they also offer a widerange of business opportunities.Cover image: Planck during its final cleaning.The spacecraft’s surface was inspected under UVlight to detect dust particles that fluoresce afterillumination with UV (Credit: ESA)
  3. 3. Preface 3 ContentsPREFACE SECTION CAbout this publication 4 4 Large Research Facilities in the UK 58Acknowledgements 5 4.1 Introduction 60Foreword 6 4.2 Science and Technology Facilities Council 60UKTI 8 4.2.1 Diamond Light Source 61 4.2.2 ISIS 62SECTION A 4.2.3 Central Laser Facility 631 Large Research Facilities 10 4.2.4 Computational Science and Engineering 641.1 Introduction 12 4.2.5 Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio1.2 Types of Large Research Facility 12 Research 651.3 Business opportunities from Large Research Facilities 13 4.2.6 Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes 662 Winning business from Large Research Facilities 16 4.2.7 UK Astronomy Technology Centre 662.1 Introduction 18 4.2.8 Joint Astronomy Centre 682.2 Key factors of success 18 4.2.9 RAL Space 682.3 How can UKTI help UK organisations succeed with 4.2.10 Accelerator Science and Technology Centre 69 Large Research Facilities to win contracts? 22 4.3 Natural Environment Research Council 70 4.3.1 British Antarctic Survey 71SECTION B 4.3.2 British Geological Survey 723 UK capability in selected technology areas 24 4.3.3 Centre for Ecology and Hydrology 723.1 Introduction 26 4.3.4 National Centre for Atmospheric Science 723.2 Cryogenics 27 4.3.5 National Centre for Earth Observation 743.3 Fusion energy 30 4.3.6 National Oceanography Centre 743.4 High-performance computing 30 4.4 Biotechnology and Biological Sciences3.5 Neutron scattering and muon spectroscopy 33 Research Council 743.6 Precision engineering 33 4.5 Medical Research Council 763.7 Synchrotrons 36 4.6 Culham Centre for Fusion Energy 80 4.6.1 Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak 81CASE STUDIES 38 4.6.2 Joint European Torus 813.1 Scientific Magnetics and CVT Ltd 40 4.7 Other research facilities 813.2 Oxford Instruments and its partnership with ISIS 42 4.7.1 National Nuclear Laboratory 813.3 Culham Centre for Fusion Energy 44 4.7.2 Dalton Nuclear Institute 823.4 MG Sanders Ltd 46 4.7.3 Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre 843.5 Viglen – CERN collaboration 48 4.7.4 Integrated Vehicle Health Management Centre 843.6 Prototech Engineering Ltd – ISIS collaboration 49 4.7.5 Cockcroft Institute 853.7 Zeeko Ltd 50 4.8 Catapult centres 883.8 OpTIC 523.9 Instrument Design Technology 54 SECTION D3.10 Observatory Sciences Ltd 56 Annexes references 90 Annex 1 Abbreviations 92 Annex 2 Glossary of technical terms 94 Annex 3 List of websites 103 Annex 4 Bibliography 110 Annex 5 Contact UKTI 110
  4. 4. 4 Large Research Facilities About this publicationThe aim of this publication is to make This publication is divided into three A series of Annexes lists abbreviations,UK organisations (especially companies) sections: 
Section A highlights the breadth glossary of technical terms, selectedaware of major business opportunities of business opportunities presented by websites, bibliography and contactfrom Large Research Facilities (LRFs) LRFs and offers practical guidance on detail in UKTI. The glossary provideson a worldwide basis. It highlights the what factors to consider when applying for general descriptions of selectedfactors they need to consider when tenders from these facilities. technical terms used in this document.seeking to exploit such opportunities, These descriptors have been found Section B showcases UK capabilityand how UK Trade Investment (UKTI) using a variety of sources, including in selected technology areas suchcan offer targeted support to bid for and Wikipedia. as cryogenics, fusion energy, high-win contracts from these facilities. performance computing, neutron The reader should also note that thisAnother important purpose is to scattering and muon spectroscopy, publication does not include every LRFprovide UK missions abroad with a precision engineering and synchrotrons. in the UK or provide a detailed analysiscomprehensive picture of the UK’s This is supplemented by a series of case of all the country’s Research Councilsworld-leading academic/industrial studies of UK companies, which have and academic/industrial capability. Norcapability in selected technology won contracts from LRFs (some with does it present a comprehensive listareas and the types of LRFs that exist UKTI support). of overseas LRFs. There are simply tooin this country. This is done to help many of them. Section C presents an overview of LRFs inin the identification of commercial the UK, focusing particularly on Research What it does do, though, is presentopportunities arising from LRFs in Councils, and other facilities such as a thorough overview of selected UKoverseas markets that would be relevant the National Nuclear Laboratory, the industrial and research capability andto UK organisations. Integrated Vehicle Health Management how it can support LRFs around the Centre and the Catapult centres. world.Dr Amit KhandelwalUKTI
  5. 5. Preface 5ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS UKTI would like to thank all the organisations for their contributions to the creation of this publication. They include:Thank you to Sabine Adeyinka and Advanced Manufacturing National Nuclear LaboratoryDr Raeid Jewad for their assistance in Research Centre Observatory Sciences Ltdcompiling this publication. British Cryogenics Cluster OpTIC CERN Oxford Instruments Cockcroft Institute PA Consulting Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Prototech Engineering Ltd CVT Ltd Scientific Magnetics Dalton Nuclear Institute UK Research Councils – Science and Diamond Light Source Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Instrument Design Technology Ltd Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Biotechnology and Biological Integrated Vehicle Health Management Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Centre at Cranfield University Medical Research Council (MRC) ISIS Viglen Ltd MG Sanders Ltd Zeeko Ltd
  6. 6. 6 Large Research Facilities Foreword Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is a 4-m class wide field survey telescope for the southern hemisphere, equipped with a near infrared camera and has an azimuth-altitude mount. It is located at the ESO’s Cerro Paranal Observatory in Chile (Credit: VISTA). Right: Wide-field view of the Orion Nebula (Messier 42), lying about 1350 light-years from Earth taken with the VISTA infrared survey telescope. The new telescope’s huge field of view allows the whole nebula and its surroundings to be imaged in a single picture and its infrared vision also means that it can peer deep into the normally hidden dusty regions and reveal the curious antics of the very active young stars buried there. This image was created from Steve O’Leary images taken through Z, J and Ks filters in the Director – Infrastructure and near-infrared part of the spectrum. The exposure Low Carbon, UKTI times were ten minutes per filter. The image covers a region of sky about one degree by 1.5 degrees.(Credit: ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA. Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit)It is my pleasure to present this The UK also contributes to several As part of the UK Government’s agendapublication, Business Opportunities from international LRFs through direct of growth through trade, UKTI is keen toLarge Research Facilities – UK Industrial subscription fees to overseas facilities ensure that UK organisations are:and Research Capability Serving the World. such as CERN, home to the world’s largest ●● Aware of major business opportunities particle accelerator and the European from LRFs on a worldwide basis, andThe UK is home to some of the biggest Southern Observatory (ESO) or through theand best LRFs anywhere in the world, Offered targeted support through EU, for example, ITER (the International ●●catering for many different disciplines UKTI’s extensive global network so that Tokamak Experimental Reactor). Thisranging from astronomy and engineering they are able to make contact with investment is focused on ensuring thatthrough to molecular biology, medical senior LRF decision makers, and bid the UK’s research community remains atresearch and the natural sciences. for/win contracts from these facilities. the forefront of science, technology andFunded by the UK Government, facilities innovation through scientific collaboration. UKTI is also keen to help overseassuch as the British Antarctic Survey, Crucially, LRFs offer diverse and organisations bring their high-qualityDiamond Light Source, ISIS Pulsed attractive procurement opportunities investment to the UK, and ideally toNeutron and Muon Source, and the for UK organisations. For example, the set up in science and innovation hubsCulham Centre for Fusion Energy, have European Southern Observatory has such as the Harwell Oxford Science andnot only secured the UK the premier budgeted €1 billion for the construction Innovation Campus and the Daresburyposition as one of the best places to of Europe’s Extremely Large Telescope, Science and Innovation Campus, or inundertake research but also support while CERN’s annual procurement one of the many science parks that exista vibrant high-technology industrial budget is over £200 million. in this country.manufacturing base.
  7. 7. Preface 7 “ he UK supports some of T the biggest and best LRFs anywhere in the world, embracing many different disciplines ranging from astronomy and engineering through to the natural sciences. These LRFs offer significant and challenging business opportunities for UK Industry globally”The aim of this publication is threefold. Third, to provide an overview of theFirst, to help highlight the breadth of diverse range and capabilities of LRFsbusiness opportunities offered by LRFs, currently based in the UK. They areand which UK organisations should playing an increasing role in undertakingconsider applying for. Practical guidance contract research and providing solutionsgleaned from companies, the UK’s to academic and industrial challengesResearch Councils and procurement throughout the world, especially throughofficials at LRFs is also provided. This research-based partnerships.outlines the factors to consider when Whether you are venturing into selling toapplying for tenders to win contracts an overseas LRF for the first time, or arefrom these facilities. Artist’s impression of the European Extremely Large an experienced exporter trying to break Telescope (E-ELT) on Cerro Armazones, a 3060-metreSecond, to showcase the UK’s academic into an existing or new facility, UKTI offers mountaintop in Chile’s Atacama Desert. The E-ELT,and industrial capability in a range of a range of trade support services that can a LRF in development, will be the largest optical/technology areas such as cryogenics, help you in doing business internationally. infrared telescope in the world — the world’s biggestnuclear fusion, precision engineering and eye on the sky. (Credit: ESO) I would encourage you to contact ussynchrotrons. This is supplemented by a (see Annex 5) to explore the businessseries of case studies of UK organisations opportunities that arise from LRFs allwhich have engaged with LRFs and over the world, and we wish you luck insubsequently won contracts from them. winning contracts.
  8. 8. 8 Large Research Facilities UKTI UK TRADE INVESTMENT UK Trade Investment (UKTI) is the Government Department that helps UK-based companies to succeed in the global economy. We also help overseas companies bring their high-quality investment to the UK’s dynamic economy, acknowledged as Europe’s best place from which to succeed in global business. UKTI offers expertise and contacts through its extensive network of specialists both in the UK and in British embassies and other diplomatic offices around the world. We provide companies with the tools they require to be competitive on the world stage.
  9. 9. Preface 9UKTI supports a wide range of Britishbusinesses through events and specialistworkshopsInvestment to know the UK’s strengths and where bespoke market intelligence, we can investment opportunities exist and to help you crack foreign markets andUKTI’s comprehensive range of services help businesses coming to the UK get up get to grips quickly with overseasassists overseas companies, whatever and running with speed and confidence. regulations and business practice.their size and experience, to bringhigh-quality investment to the UK. In October 2010, UKTI was awardedThey are delivered in partnership with Trade the accolade of Best Trade Promotionteams in London and the devolved UKTI staff are experts in helping your Organisation (Developed Country) atadministrations of Scotland, Wales and business grow internationally. We provide the International Trade Centre’s TradeNorthern Ireland. expert trade advice and practical support Promotion Organisation Network Awards. to UK-based companies wishing to grow The awards recognise excellence inOur services include providing bespoke their business overseas. Whatever stage export development initiatives and theinformation about important commercial of development your business is at, we ability of UKTI to meet the challengesmatters, such as company registration, can give you the support that you need ahead.immigration, incentives, labour, realestate, transport and legal issues. to expand and prosper, assisting you on every step of the exporting journey.Deciding where to locate yourinternational business is often a long Through a range of unique services, including participation at selected trade For further information please visitand involved process. It is UKTI’s job fairs, outward missions and providing www.ukti.gov.uk
  10. 10. 10 Large Research Facilities“ he diversity of Large Research Facilities around the T world is truly astonishing, ranging from medical research hospitals and ground-based telescopes through to nuclear fusion experimental reactors, neutron sources and particle accelerators. Crucially, they have a diverse range of needs, such as architectural design, civil engineering, cryogenics, instrumentation and sensor systems among many others, which the UK can help meet. UK business should seize upon these requirements and, with support from UKTI, build long-term profitable partnerships on what are exciting business opportunities.” Dr Amit Khandelwal UKTI
  11. 11. Section A – Large Research Facilities 11Section ALarge ResearchFacilities
  12. 12. 12 Large Research Facilities Large Research FacilitiesAerial view of Diamond Synchrotron. (Image courtesy of Diamond Light Source)1.1 Introduction In essence, LRFs serve to solve speeding up the drug discovery process challenges facing the world on energy, for the pharmaceutical industry, andThe number of Large Research Facilities living with environmental change, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a(LRFs), commonly referred to as “Research ageing and health, digital economy and particle accelerator which is currentlyInfrastructures”, has risen sharply in nanoscience, through engineering to being used to elucidate the existence ofthe last few decades both in Europe and applications. the Higgs boson.further afield. Many of these facilitiesundertake cutting-edge, and increasingly Yet, despite this growth, there is no oneinternational, scientific research to provide universal definition of what constitutes 1.2 Types of Large Research answers to questions such as: an LRF as they can vary so much – Facility from oceanographic ships to particle LRFs can be simplistically divided into●● Why is there a universe? Was there accelerators and synchrotrons, and from the following categories: (i) UK – national ever life on Mars? research hospitals to nuclear fusion facility, (ii) intergovernmental and (iii)●● How are the chemical elements reactors, space-based sensors and created? overseas, as outlined in Table 1.1. ground-based telescopes and large data●● How can we design better treatments sets. A key feature of an LRF is its substantial for cancer, malaria and diabetes? procurement budget, either for upgrades Two specific examples are the Diamond to existing infrastructure or for new●● How do the oceans regulate the Light Source – the UK’s national builds. As a result, LRFs can offer diverse, Earth’s climate? synchrotron facility – which has helped lucrative and often high-end business●● Can we create new materials to store to solve commercial concerns such as opportunities for UK companies. energy?
  13. 13. Section A – Large Research Facilities 13Table 1.1: elected examples of LRFs – UK national facility, intergovernmental and overseas S Type of LRF Funding Selected examples Additional details UK – national facility Principally funded by the UK Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) Procurement rules in these Government through the Research facilities are subject to OJEU rules NERC Councils such as the Natural established by the European Environment Research Council • British Antarctic Survey Commission. (NERC) and the Science and • National Oceanography Centre Technology Facilities Council • National Centre for Atmospheric Science (STFC). STFC • iamond Light Source (with 14% from the D Wellcome Trust) • SIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source I • K Astronomy Technology Centre U Intergovernmental Funded by a series of nations. This • xtreme Light Infrastructure (ELI), Czech Republic, E These tend to have either unique could be jointly with European Hungary, Romania procurement rules or rules based partners, or with other global • uropean Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), E on the EU system. They often partners such as the USA. Switzerland and France aim to buy from their funding These facilities can be located in • uropean Southern Observatory (ESO), Germany and E countries. the UK or elsewhere around the Chile world. • uropean Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), France E • nstitut Laue-Langevin (ILL), France I • nternational Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER), I France (originally called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Overseas These national facilities are • ational Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, N These have unique procurement principally funded by overseas Canada rules. The facilities often prefer governments. • Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, India procurement from organisations • orea Aerospace Research Institute, South Korea K based in the funding country. • National Space Organization, Taiwan • ew Karolinska Solna University Hospital Project N (including Research Centre), Sweden • Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA • Los Alamos National Laboratory, USAConcomitantly, there are opportunities often multidisciplinary and serve many jointly funded or suitable subjects forfor innovative UK-based and overseas different users. Yet another defining international collaboration, in somecompanies to use LRFs at national feature is that the facilities have strong cases distributed across a number ofscience and innovation campuses such academic and increasingly business different countries. For example, theas at Harwell and Daresbury, and to links, often across nations. Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) isdraw on the diverse range of technical located in the Czech Republic, Hungary Given that research is being pursuedcapabilities within this specialist and Romania. on an international basis, reflectingenvironment. the nature of global challenges such as Crucially, these large infrastructuresAnother important characteristic of climate change and in areas such as also have ongoing procurement needs,LRFs is their considerable size and the particle physics, many national LRFs which can present attractive businessfact that they are expensive to build, are being replaced by next-generation opportunities to UK organisations.maintain and operate. For example, in international facilities such as the This is discussed below.2011 CERN’s overall budget was 1.16 European Southern Observatory andbillion Swiss francs, which is spent on ITER. These are now being viewed as a 1.3 Business opportunities the running costs of the facility such as research resource for both academia and from Large Researchsalaries and energy, and on procuring a industry. Facilitieswide range of products and services. LRFs often fall outside the funding LRFs offer both volume-based andNot surprisingly, LRFs have a life span of remit or capability of any individual value-added opportunities for UKbetween 10 and 20 years (or more), are organisation, and are potentially organisations, and there are plenty of
  14. 14. 14 Large Research Facilitiesworthwhile ones to pursue. For example, When planning the next generation of and their antiparticles rather than protons,these can range from accelerator science facilities, LRFs will often encounter physicists will gain a different perspectivetechnology, advanced materials (such areas where their scientific requirements on the underlying physics.as beryllium-coated vacuum vessels and cannot be met by today’s products and For a UK company, such programmesmetal matrix composites), construction technologies. To address this issue, LRFs represent a potential opportunity toand cryogenics through to project regularly initiate multi-million-euro advise on engineering and designmanagement, design studies and development programmes in partnership challenges, as well as to participate inremote handling (see Table 1.2). with organisations such as universities. the manufacture of component parts forFor example, when constructing the LHC, For example, in 2011 CERN entered into the machine itself.CERN had a materials budget of almost collaboration with five UK universities, as well as the Accelerator Science and Most LRFs also actively promote the5 billion Swiss francs, while the ESO has commercial exploitation of intellectualbudgeted €1 billion for the construction Technology Centre (ASTeC) at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s property that has been generatedof Europe’s Extremely Large Telescope. through their technology development Daresbury Laboratory for the design of keyContracts worth millions of euros are components of the beam delivery system programmes. In some cases they mayregularly awarded to European suppliers for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). even provide funding to support thein high-technology areas, including application of these technologies to otherdetectors, optics and precision motion The aim of CLIC is to develop a machine fields. Not surprisingly this can prove tosystems. Furthermore, there is the to collide electrons and positrons (anti- be an attractive proposition for many UKopportunity to develop cutting-edge electrons) head on at energies up to several cutting-edge technology companies.technologies or products in association teraelectronvolts (TeV). This energy range is similar to the LHC, but by using electrons But it’s not just technology companieswith LRFs. that can benefit from working with LRFs. Contracts for architectural design, largeTable 1.2: Examples of areas in which LRFs procure steel structure fabrication or tunnel excavation are also awarded by LRFs. For ■■ Accelerator technology, magnets and superconductivity example, a UK architectural firm, BFLS, ■■ Advanced materials won the contract to design the building for ELI in the Czech Republic. ■■ Architecture, civil engineering, buildings and construction Many LRFs, such as Diamond Light ■■ Biological material Source, CERN and ITER, are also ■■ Chemicals prominent national and international brands, and a case study showing how ■■ Cryogenics, vacuum systems and gas a product and/or service from the UK ■■ Computing and IT services/support has been used by them is a compelling endorsement and a powerful marketing ■■ Design studies tool to gain new business from other ■■ Electrical/electronic systems LRFs around the world. ■■ Fluid systems There is no doubt that LRFs are an attractive customer for UK organisations ■■ Instrumentation and sensor systems from the perspective of business ■■ Mechanical handling and structures opportunities. Winning a contract from an LRF can not only generate revenue but also ■■ Particle detectors enhance your reputation. This in turn can ■■ Project management lead to repeat or new business by opening doors to procurements from other LRFs. ■■ Remote handling In short, there is a lot that UK businesses ■■ Support services can do to increase their chances of winning an LRF contract and hence add ■■ Synchrotron beamlines to their profitability. The next chapter ■■ System integration services identifies some of the key factors of success in order to win business from ■■ Welded structures LRFs around the world.
  15. 15. Section A – Large Research Facilities 15Many LRFs, such as Diamond Light Source, CERN and ITER,are also prominent national and international brands, and acase study showing how your product has been used by themis a compelling endorsement and a powerful marketing toolto gain new business from other LRFs around the world. ATLAS particle detector at the LHC during installation © CERN
  16. 16. 16 Large Research Facilities“ ndustry is vital in keeping I CERN’s research facilities running, supplying us with everything from off-the-shelf products to highly technical components. This provides the opportunity to small, medium and large enterprises to participate in and benefit from technological advancements in our quest for scientific discoveries.” Dante Gregorio Section Head – Contracts for supplies and IT, Procurement Service at CERN
  17. 17. Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 17Winning businessfrom LargeResearch Facilities
  18. 18. 18 Large Research Facilities Winning business from Large Research Facilities The LRF zone at Technology World 2010 and specialist one2one meetings at Technology World 2011.2.1 Introduction country. For example, the UK has LRFs of pan-European interest. They industry liaison officers for CERN, correspond to the long-term needsA wide variety of factors should be the European Synchrotron Radiation of European research communities,considered in order to enhance a UK Facility (ESRF), Institut Laue- covering all scientific areas, regardlessorganisation’s chances of successfully Langevin (ILL), the European Southern of location. In essence, this activity aimsapplying for, and winning, tenders from Observatory (ESO) and the International to promote the European research areaLRFs. This includes networking and Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER). concept which will be delivered throughestablishing personal contact within an Their work is designed to improve the a host of LRFs.LRF; keeping abreast of developments in flow of information from the facilitiesLRFs both in the UK and abroad; getting Several European countries are now to UK industry and can be valuableinvolved in technical development; using the ESFRI Roadmap as a blueprint in helping business to make contactsand understanding procurement rules. for the development of national as well as providing information onThese factors, together with the type of roadmaps and for the setting of national procurement rules. UKTI can also helpsupport that UKTI offers, are discussed priorities, including existing and new in this regard (see Section 2.3).below. research facilities. Learning about future research Such resources can be invaluable for2.2 Key factors of success infrastructures businesses by giving them significant A number of roadmaps on LRFs notice about existing upgrades andNetworking and establishing have been published. For example, upcoming developments in researchpersonal contact the Research Council UK (RCUK) infrastructures.Personal contacts at LRFs can help Large Facilities Roadmap provideswith understanding the requirements Getting involved in technical a comprehensive picture of currentof upcoming projects and can also development facilities, and their renewals andmake the industry aware of lower-value upgrades. It also identifies emerging Facilities often require cutting-edgecontracts that do not need to go through facilities that are of the highest strategic technologies which are not “off-the-formal procedures. importance for the UK. shelf” products. Development of theseThe UK has an industry representative technologies often involves large Similarly, the European Strategy Forumfor many of the intergovernmental teams of researchers from the facilities, on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI)research facilities funded by this academia and industry working together roadmap identified new and potential
  19. 19. Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 19For further information on the RCUK and ESFRI roadmaps please visit:Research Councils UK Large Facilities Roadmap: European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) Roadmap:www.rcuk.ac.uk/research/Infrastructure/Pages/lfr.aspx www.ec.europa.eu/research/infrastructures/index_ en.cfm?pg=esfri-roadmapwith funds coming from several routes, in France, are established as private It is noteworthy that somesuch as the facilities and industries companies governed by civil law. intergovernmental organisations, likethemselves or funding agencies. CERN, aim to achieve “juste retour,” which Such facilities can establish their represents a quantitative linkage betweenIndustry involvement at a development own internal governance procedures, the contributions that a partner countrystage positions a company to receive including the rules under which they makes to an LRF collaboration, andcontracts in that sector. It also allows purchase equipment and services, and the benefits that it obtains in terms ofthem to supply similar facilities that are not subject to EU procurement contracts awarded and nationals hired.may use similar technologies. requirements. Their internal rules are usually decided upon and agreed by Juste retour can be a formalUnderstanding the procurement representatives of the funding member requirement, with strict accounting torules states or partner country and are ensure that money contributed returnsUnderstanding the procurement rules intended to ensure a high level of cost to each partner as the infrastructureof each LRF is key to bidding for, and efficiency, transparency and fairness to is built and operated. More often, it iswinning, tenders. Many have different the member states. a “soft” requirement, where benefits,rules depending on their governance, the averaged over several years, are incountry they are located in and the local For example, CERN’s basis of some kind of approximate proportion tolaws that apply. For example, research adjudication for supply contracts is investments made.infrastructures in the EU will follow the that a contract will be awarded to theEuropean procurement rules. These bidder with the lowest offer ((Free Carrier Overall, understanding which processinclude UK research infrastructures such (FCA) price)), which complies with the will be applied during the assessment ofas the High-End Computing Terascale technical specification and delivery any bids is crucial for winning tenders.Resource (HECToR) and the Science and requirements. This is applied even if a Table 2.1 presents a comprehensive listTechnology Facilities Council’s (STFC’s) bid offers a technically superior product. of factors to consider when identifyingCentral Laser Facility and ISIS. If, however, suppliers in a member state and applying for business opportunities cannot provide the equipment required from LRFs.Other research facilities, like CERN, at a reasonable cost or if no technicalare funded by several countries and The next section looks at the types alternative exists, then as an exceptionalhave the status of intergovernmental of support UKTI offers in assisting UK circumstance contracts can be placedorganisation. Others, like ILL and ESRF organisations to engage with LRFs with non-member states. around the world.
  20. 20. 20 Large Research FacilitiesTable 2.1Factors to consider when identifying and applyingfor business opportunities from LRFs Theme Area(s) Details Networking and “Opening the door” Identify and make contact with key decision makers in the LRF (e.g., in procurement and technical functions) communication “Making personal to: contact” and “Gaining • Build your relationship and establish your business credentials on your skills base and industrial capability, traction” • Gain general information/intelligence on doing business with that particular LRF, • Understand and discuss with LRF officials aspects such as how the LRF operates, the requirements of a specific tender and the intricacies of the procurement process. Once your relationship is established, it ought to be easier to get responses to emails on specific questions you may have regarding an existing or future business opportunity. If in doubt, ask. Do not make any assumptions and do learn more about the LRF. This will help increase your confidence about the LRF, its focus and what it is trying to achieve. This should help you construct any bid and reduce risk in terms of time and cost. UKTI and Industry Make contact with UKTI’s LRF Unit and Research Councils such as STFC and the Culham Centre for Fusion Liaison Officers (ILOs) Energy (CCFE) to explore what help they can provide to your organisation. This could include participating in overseas trade missions to LRFs or “meet-the-buyer” type events where key decision makers from LRFs are going to be present. Note: STFC has ILOs for CERN, ESRF, ILL and ESO, while CCFE has one for ITER. Communications Maintain an open communication style which engenders trust and builds relationships with officials in the LRF. strategy/flow Always reply to requests for information (for example, related to specific tendering opportunities/bids) even if it is only to say thank -you. This will help maintain a healthy profile with LRF officials. Marketing Marketing strategy, • Prominently position your brand when you approach LRFs and at the same time ensure that your marketing brand management is fit for purpose and clearly linked to the business opportunity. For example, it is crucial to understand the technical components of the tender, and how your organisation can deliver to the tender requirement. This will help to present your case on technically challenging opportunities given the high risk content in some of these projects. • Emphasise quality standards, past and present customer base, key differentiators of your product/service/ technical capability from competitor organisations, and the ability to undertake the work and deliver it on time/to cost. Market research Most LRFs have procurement teams that undertake “market research” to ascertain what suppliers exist nationally and globally. This activity is also referred to as “market survey”, a term used at CERN. Some LRFs may restrict this search in the first instance to countries that provide funding to their organisation. Market research can become part of the pre-qualification stage within the overall LRF procurement process. Tendering Accessing tenders Regularly consult LRF websites for tender opportunities. For example, ITER opportunities can be found at http:// opportunities, fusionforenergy.europa.eu/procurementsgrants/industryportal.aspx while the STFC tender alert service can be procurement, found at www.stfc.ac.uk/forms/tenderreg.aspx. pricing, foreign Register your details with UKTI to receive notifications about business opportunities from LRFs. exchange, over- gilding Procurement • Understand the procurement rules, and seek clarity where needed from the procuring organisation. These rules can be bureaucratic and stringent, irrespective of the organisation’s size. • Timescales for applying for tenders vary and, at times, the window of opportunity can be limited. • Do not over-step the mark in terms of capacity, capability and expertise when considering applying for a tender. • If you have never undertaken business with LRFs or do not have the experience of undertaking large contracts, focus on the smaller contracts which can be successfully delivered. A small contract may seed a larger one in due course. Pricing • The lowest bid or “offer” which complies with the technical specification/delivery requirements can be the basis of an adjudication for LRFs’ procurements in contrast to the best technical tender or other extra “value add” considerations such as quality and longevity of products or service delivered. For example, CERN awards contracts for industrial services to be executed on its site on a best-value-for-money basis. • There is likely to be inflexibility from the LRF in the negotiation of the final contract in terms of price. Hence it is important to seek clarification from the LRF about the scope for negotiation on this matter. • Present a clear breakdown of prices (e.g. costs for design, specialised tooling, raw materials, testing/quality assurance, transport) and factor in price increases to cover unforeseen changes in raw material and/or labour costs Exchange rate • Be aware of the price sensitivities of the procuring LRF, in particular due to fluctuating foreign exchange rates fluctuations which can impact on your profit stream. In essence, never speculate in a currency in which you do not have major exposure or conduct business. Over-gilding • Don’t “over-gild” (give the buyer more than requested in the tender document and associated technical specification).
  21. 21. Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 21Table 2.1 continued Theme Area(s) Details Business Local distributors Consider establishing your presence in a foreign market through a local distributor, especially in countries such as arrangements/ South Korea and Taiwan where market access can be difficult because of language barriers. processes A local distributor can help in identifying tenders before they are formally released into the open marketplace, thereby giving you more time to consider the opportunity as well as for the application process. UKTI can help find local agents through its Overseas Market Introduction Service. Contractual • ommercial conditions in contracts from LRFs can be rigid (with almost no negotiation). For example: C conditions • onsequential and indirect losses might be unacceptable and unlimited liabilities are imposed on companies C delivering the contract by the LRF procuring the product or service. Some LRFs, such as CERN, do not impose the condition that a contractor is liable for any indirect or consequential losses, except in cases of gross negligence or wilful misconduct. • he cap on contractor liabilities is high (e.g. twice the contract value for technical liabilities) or is ruled out by UK T corporate governance rules. For example, CERN normally caps the liability to the highest of (i) the contract price or (ii) 1 million Swiss francs or (iii) the insured amount of the liable party’s applicable insurance policy (except for personal injury or death and cases of gross negligence or wilful misconduct). • here may be caps on what contractors can claim. For example, there might be an unrealistic ceiling on living expenses. T • ontract negotiations tend to be legalistic and led by the legal team. The technical team may be sidelined and C there may seem to be no independent exercise to establish the best technical tender. • echnical officials often do not foresee contractual problems. T • ayment terms might be unhelpful, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. P Do note that once contracts are placed by LRFs, they generally tend to run smoothly. Contract termination Be clear about the impact and implication of contract termination. LRFs are likely to stipulate that they are not liable for costs incurred by the contractor for raw materials, specific investments and tooling. Sub-contractor If you are planning to sub-contract any work, be prepared to specify the nature of the sub-contracting, the names of the proposed sub-contractors and the estimated value of the work to be performed by them. In order to minimise risk, some LRFs might impose restrictions at the tendering phase as to the extent of sub-contracting. Contract performance • ompanies will be judged not only on the offer price but also on the performance of the contract. Be prepared for C the monitoring of contract performance on a regular basis. If a contract has been awarded by an LRF, continually inform its officials about progress, execution plans and delivery schedules, including any difficulties. • ome LRFs might insist on detailed monitoring for non-standard products where the industry has no experience S in manufacturing specific products. Scientific/ Partnerships • roactively network and consider partnering in the technical arena. This may help realise future business P technological opportunities. Do note that LRFs might include contractual clauses which sufficiently protect themselves against development possible risks, especially where collaborative/joint development work is undertaken. • larify the ownership and use of any intellectual property to be generated before any partnering arrangement C commences. Market intelligence Keep abreast of developments in new or existing research infrastructures through roadmaps and LRF Industrial Advisory Boards. Also liaise with UKTI, as well as with ILOs at STFC and CCFE. Intellectual Technical capability, • rotect your technical capability and know-how by thoroughly reviewing issues surrounding the ownership of P property rights know-how, licensing IPR, especially when developed in a consortium arrangement or between a company and the LRF. (IPR) • Keep a clear inventory of background and foreground intellectual property. • onsider licensing your technology, especially if you are concerned about IPR protection, enforcement and C access within a specific geographical market. Relationship Cultures Be sensitive to cultural differences in doing business. For example, relationship-building and networking in Asia development are key components to success. In contrast, in North America the business approach is more transactional. Language Some tenders will be released only in a local language rather than in English. Therefore, pay particular attention to the accurate translation of documents to ensure clarity in what an LRF requires. Also check which language the bid needs to be submitted in, and thoroughly proofread the bid prior to submission. Always keep a copy of the bid itself and any supporting documents. Procurement and • orge a robust relationship with procurement officials and technical researchers. The former will help to explain F technical officials the procurement rules/procedures and identify technical officials. The latter will be able to talk in detail about the specification of the tender. • uilding good relationships in the long term will prove indispensable for future tendering needs/opportunities. B • e prepared to share your CV (and that of your team, including sub-contractors) if requested to do so. B These actions will help to establish your credibility and technical competency. Consortia and Consortia formation Consider consortium formation with organisations in the host country where the LRF is located. This is likely to be accessing viewed favourably by the procuring organisation. But be clear about the ownership of any IPR that is generated as supply chains a consequence of the consortium’s work. Supply chains Identifying and accessing supply chains can help win work from LRFs. This is especially true where a UK company is not a primary contractor or the UK does not have sole expertise in a specific area of need. A local distribution agent can also assist in accessing supply chains.
  22. 22. 22 Large Research FacilitiesTable 2.2: Winning LRF contracts – how UKTI can help UKTI Trade Support Services • ndertaking the Overseas Market Introduction Service (OMIS) – a chargeable U • rranging and facilitating general/bespoke networking activities between UK A but heavily subsidised activity which focuses on generating bespoke research organisations and senior officials at LRFs, such as with India’s NAL. and business intelligence on existing and upcoming overseas LRFs; it • his activity focused on on partnering opportunities in airframe structures T highlights partners for creating consortia and identifies key areas of overseas work, research and technology collaborations in areas such as impact, industrial and academic strength. crashworthiness, structural health monitoring, structural dynamics • elivering a range of events and missions in the UK and abroad, for example: D and aero elasticity, computational mechanics and simulation, fatigue and structural integrity and up gradation of facilities at NAL’s Structural • nformation days in the UK on partnering and business opportunities from I Technologies Division. the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) project – Czech Republic, Hungary. • onitoring of LRF tenders and alerting relevant companies to the M • K mission to a conference on business opportunities from ITER in U opportunities through an industrial database of UK firms. Barcelona, Spain and Cadarache, France. • ngaging with officials in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills E • Meet- the- buyer” event through outward and inward missions. For “ on issues such as industry opportunities and concerns with procurement example: processes in LRFs where the UK provides funding support directly or • utward mission to CERN (Switzerland), ESRF (France) and ILL (France) O indirectly, such as at CERN and ITER. • nward missions to the UK from CERN (Switzerland), ESO (Germany), ELI I (Czech Republic and Hungary), New Karolinska Solna Hospital Project (Sweden) and the National Aerospace Laboratories (India).2.3 ow can UKTI help UK H to highlight LRF opportunities to UK support services that can make doing organisations succeed organisations. business internationally as easy as with Large Research doing business in the UK. While the focus of this publication is Facilities to win contracts? on supporting UK organisations to win We can also provide budding and contracts from LRFs worldwide, UKTI established exporters with tailoredUKTI can provide UK organisations with helps to attract inward investors to bring packages of support in the form of locala wealth of assistance ranging from their high-quality investment to the UK market research, covering cultural,market intelligence through to making and, ideally, to set up in “science and political and business issues, and accesscontacts at the right decision-making innovation hubs” like the Harwell Oxford to key contacts.level in LRFs around the world. Science and Innovation Campus or in A good way of promoting your expertiseWe do this through our overseas one of the many science parks that exist to international buyers and meetingnetworks in British embassies and high in this country. A list of science parks useful contacts is by attending UKTI-commission’s around the world, and can be found at the United Kingdom sponsored information days on specificby working closely with the Science Science Park Association website, www. business opportunities offered byand Innovation Network (jointly funded ukspa.org.uk. overseas LRFs. UKTI regularly bringsby the Department for Business, The types of trade support that UKTI senior decision makers and technicalInnovation and Skills and the Foreign provides are summarised in Table 2.2, staff from these research facilities to Commonwealth Office), to identify while Annex 5 provides contact details meet UK companies at these events.overseas LRFs, to understand their within UKTI.procurement requirements and to This publication now shifts its focuspursue relevant tendering opportunities. Whether you are venturing into selling to highlight capability in selected to LRFs overseas for the first time, or technology areas where the UK hasIn addition, UKTI partners with CCFE, are an experienced exporter trying to world-leading industrial and academicthe Technology Strategy Board’s break into existing and/or new facilities expertise. This is supplemented by aKnowledge Transfer Networks and the such as ELI, ESO, CERN or ITER, UKTI’s series of case studies of UK organisationsUK Research Councils (such as Science dedicated team offers a range of trade which have won contracts from LRFs.and Technology Facilities Council)
  23. 23. Section A – Winning business from Large Research Facilities 23 “ uilding the world’s best B telescopes and instruments presents significant commercial opportunities for UK industry, working in partnership with the UK Astronomy Technology Centre, ESO and the University instrumentation groups, especially as we move toward construction of the European Extremely Large Telescope.” Professor Colin Cunningham UK Extremely Large Telescope Programme Director
  24. 24. 24 Large Research Facilities
  25. 25. Section B – UK capability in selected technology areas 25Section BUK capabilityin selectedtechnology areas “ e feel privileged to have been able to develop products in close W collaboration with world-leading neutron scientists from ISIS. Their knowledge and expertise was crucial to the development of a range of helium recondensing magnet products particularly well suited to neutron scattering facilities. Delivering innovative systems to a prestigious facility like ISIS also enhanced Oxford Instruments’ reputation and credibility as world leaders in superconducting magnet systems. We have since been able to offer similar systems to other key neutron scattering facilities in Europe, USA, Australia, Japan and more recently China. This application area accounts for around 10 per cent of our overall business, so it played a significant part in the growth of Oxford Instruments NanoScience over the last few years” Dr Jim Hutchins Managing Director Oxford Instruments NanoScience
  26. 26. 26 Large Research Facilities UK capability in selected technology areasTable 3.1: Selected examples of UK organisations possessing cryogenic capability (indicating scope of supply) Organisation Description Field/area of operation Cryoconnect Cryoconnect is a specialist division of Tekdata’s Interconnect Systems, and deals solely with Cryogenic wiring and cabling and interconnection solutions in cryogenic systems. Its cables are used in dilution interconnections refrigerators, cryogenic systems, superconducting magnet systems, low-temperature detector systems, infrared array systems, and general housekeeping on cryogenic systems of all scales. Cryoconnect has supplied a range of LRFs such as ESO, CERN, CCFE and the James Webb Space Telescope (which will be a large infrared- optimized space telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, and is an international collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency). CVT Ltd (see Case Study CVT Ltd manufactures ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chambers, systems and components for Manufacturing UHV chambers, 3.1) different application areas. The company’s facility is made up of computer numerical control high vacuum systems and (CNC) machining, welding, UHV cleaning and electrical/electronics wiring, assembly and test components, related assembling, for integrated systems. fabrication and computer-aided design (CAD) services Herose UK Herose develops and manufactures innovative valves for use in extreme temperatures between Cryogenic valves −270°C and +400°C, special valves for air separation and valves for liquefied natural gas (LNG). Herose also develops its range of cryogenic shut-off valves by using unique features that have resulted in improvements to the sealing characteristics and also substantially reduced wear during service life. ICEoxford ICEoxford designs, manufactures and refurbishes specialist ultra-low temperature equipment Instruments, cryogenic for the cryogenic research community. This includes wet systems, dry systems and thermometry and sensors recondensing systems. Monroe Brothers Ltd Monroe Brothers provides consultancy in the field of low-temperature engineering. It specialises Design, consultancy and in technologies using liquid nitrogen at −196°C to provide fast and effective cooling for industrial custom-built systems and scientific applications, and also liquid helium down to 1.4K for scientific applications. Examples include pollution control with liquid nitrogen and superconducting magnet design with liquid helium. Oxford Cryosystems Ltd Oxford Cryosystems manufactures a range of coolers designed specifically for sample cooling in X-ray Coolers for Diffraction and diffraction experiments. These include the Cobra, Desktop Cooler and Cryostream, the latter of which Cryocoolers was first developed over 25 years ago in the Clarendon Laboratory at the University of Oxford. Software has also been a traditional strength of the company, from the firmware used to control low-temperature systems to specialist crystallographic software. The company also manufactures the Coolstar range of Gifford McMahon coolers, and is branching out into new applications for its cryocoolers such as high-temperature superconductivity and astrophysics. Oxford Instruments OINS creates high-performance cryogenic and cryogen-free environments for ultra-low Design, consultancy and NanoScience (OINS) (see temperature and high magnetic field applications, including nanoscale characterisation, custom-built systems Case Study 3.2) materials science and quantum computing. It provides the most advanced experimental equipment and scientific instrumentation, from “best in class” standard products to custom-built systems and tailored consultancy services. The product range includes dilution refrigerators, superconducting magnets, optical and spectroscopy cryostats and cryogenic spares and accessories, including a new range of cryogenic temperature controllers and magnet power supplies.3.1 Introduction the forefront in terms of technology advancement and supplying toLRFsThe UK possesses a strong and vibrant around the world. A capability analysisacademic and industrial base in a of these areas now follows, supporteddiverse range of high-technology areas, by a series of case studies of UKsuch as cryogenics, fusion energy, organisations that have won contractshigh-performance computing, neutron from LRFs. The reader is asked to notescattering, muon spectroscopy, precision that the organisations listed in Section Bengineering and synchrotron beamlines. are purely to illustrate the UK’s capabilityThis capability plays a critical role in the high-technology areas where theyin ensuring that the UK remains at are mentioned.

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