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Information-seeking Behaviour of LGBTQ health professionals
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Information-seeking Behaviour of LGBTQ health professionals

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Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Saskatoon, May 2013.

Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Health Libraries Association, Saskatoon, May 2013.

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  • We increased the granularity of existing questions from the 2003 study and added questions on changes over the last ten years, the desirability of online chat consultations with librarians, and the quality of current information resources
  • Explain why the two charts are different lengths
  • Emphasise that this is for personal reasons or research, not for patient care.
  • These responses were more varied, but still showed a tendency to wish for an LGBTQ medical librarian
  • DK in 2003 was 13.7%
  • Comments tend to cover resources/info more generally without necessarily commenting on online. Gaps in the literature, wrong research focus etc.
  • Many comments on journals which aren’t stocked by medical libraries, stigma/homophobia. Mental health (and note the high number of mental health practitioners replying).
  • Very strong feeling that there isn’t enough out there on LGBTQ health… Not everyone blames the lit sources themselves though..
  • Comments tend to cover resources/info more generally without necessarily commenting on online. Gaps in the literature, wrong research focus etc.
  • There is absolutely no inclination amongst LGBTQ health professionals to prefer online chat versus face-to-face interaction for any type of question.
  • None of the comments suggested that LGBTQ health professionals would be more likely to consult a med lib via online compared to face-to-face
  • For personal questions there is a slight difference – respondents were LESS keen to use online chat! Not statistically significant.
  • None of the comments suggested that LGBTQ health professionals would be more likely to consult a med lib via online compared to face-to-face
  • I am investigating this further through email interviews. My feeling so far is that there is no strong answer to this and that most people in this population believe that service will feel more accessible as society changes.
  • None of the comments suggested that LGBTQ health professionals would be more likely to consult a med lib via online compared to face-to-face

Information-seeking Behaviour of LGBTQ health professionals Information-seeking Behaviour of LGBTQ health professionals Presentation Transcript

  • Information Needs of LGBTQ Health Professionals Martin Morris • McGill University K.R. Roberto • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • 2 1 THE BACKGROUND Why did we conduct this study? 2 THE RESULTS What did we find out? 3 THE NEXT STEPS What questions are raised by this study?
  • 3 THE BACKGROUND WHY DIDWE DECIDETO CONDUCTTHIS STUDY? Fikar and Keith (2004) conducted the first survey on this topic in 2003. They noted no previous literature on the topic. We repeated their literature search in late 2012 and found only the Fikar and Keith study. Much has changed in society since 2003, and we felt updated results were required. Fikar, C. R., & Keith, L. (2004). Information needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered health care professionals: results of an Internet survey. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 92(1), 56–65.
  • 4 THE BACKGROUND WHY DOESTHIS MATTER? Medicine is perceived as having been almost silent on the issue of equal access to healthcare for LGBTQ people (Dohrenwend, 2009) Medical curricula are considered to have insufficient content on the distinct needs of LGBTQ patients It is important for medical libraries to stay relevant and to ensure that we are accessible to everyone in our target audience.
  • 5 THE BACKGROUND AN ISSUE OF ACCESS • Paraphilias • Homosexuality, Male • Transgendered People
  • 6 THE BACKGROUND AN ISSUE OF ACCESS Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms Behavior Sexual Behavior Sexuality Bisexuality Heterosexuality Homosexuality Homosexuality, Female Homosexuality, Male
  • 7 THE BACKGROUND AN ISSUE OF ACCESS Mental Disorders Sexual and Gender Disorders Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological Dyspareunia Paraphilias Exhibitionism Fetishism (Psychiatric) Masochism Pedophilia Transvestism Voyeurism Premature Ejaculation Transsexualism Vaginismus
  • 8 THE BACKGROUND THE PURPOSES OFTHIS STUDY ARE … • To get updated information as a follow- up to the Fikar/Keith study • To ask new questions about the health information seeking needs of LGBTQ health professionals • To investigate the effect of changed societal attitudes on this population
  • 9 THE BACKGROUND METHODOLOGY Web-based survey hosted at McGill University 20 questions, some modified from the 2003 study, and some new. Promoted through related medical organisations (CMA, GMLA, GLADD etc.), Facebook,Twitter, personal contacts Semi-structured email follow-ups (in progress)
  • 10 THE RESULTS WHO REPLIED? (#1) Belgium 1 Eire 2 UK 2CanadaUSA n = 120 87 28 We have so far received 120 responses
  • 11 THE RESULTS WHO REPLIED? (#2) 40 Lesbian 41 Gay 16 Bisexual 25 Queer Other 13 n = 120 (Some respondents identified as more than one category) 13107 Not transgender Transgender
  • 12 THE RESULTS WHO REPLIED? (#3) Mental Health 35 Family Medicine 11 “Medicine” 8 Academic/Research 6 Social Work 6 Nursing 5 Public Health 5 HIV 4 Obs/Gyn 4 Rehab/OT 4 Health Admin 4 Internal Medicine 4 Oncology 3 Alternative Medicine 2 PLUS: Sexology, pharmacy, sexual health, speech therapy, dentistry, radiology, massage therapy, transsexual health, dermatology, geriatrics , emergency medicine, massage therapy…
  • 13 THE RESULTS QUESTION 1 When you are searching for information to assist you in making a clinical decision, and where you are not able to easily find or use the necessary resources, how likely is it that you would approach a medical librarian for help under the following circumstances: a. if you were seeking information for the purposes of a PATIENT’S care? b. …and where is it necessary to include the idea of being LGBTQ? c. …and where you knew the librarian was LGBTQ? “ ”
  • 46% 49%47% 48% 60% 33% Quite or very likely Quite or very unlikely Just like in 2003, LGBTQ health professionals are more likely to consult a medical librarian who is also LGBTQ on an LGBTQ health topic. 14 THE RESULTS SEEKING INFO FOR PATIENT CARE… n = 120
  • 15 THE RESULTS SEEKING INFO FOR PATIENT CARE… “ LGBTQ information is harder to find than other medical literature… ” “ I generally assume that medical librarians are not adequately informed about LGBTQ-specific health information unless they themselves identify that way… ” “ I would not expect a straight librarian to be on top of the relevant research ” “ The conversation is always easier to have when you don’t have to educate before you can get the required assistance ”
  • 54% 42.5%48.5% 47.5% 62% 33% Would consult Would not consult Just like in 2003, LGBTQ health professionals are more comfortable consulting a medical librarian who is also LGBTQ on an LGBTQ health topic. 16 THE RESULTS SEEKING PERSONAL INFORMATION… n = 120
  • 17 THE RESULTS SEEKING INFO FOR PERSONAL INFO… “ I wouldn’t want to out myself to the librarian unless I knew for sure that they were LGBT, or LGBT-friendly… ” “ I think it is still much easier to bring up LGBTQ issues with someone else you know [who] is LGBTQ themselves or is a known ally… ” “ I generally see medical librarians as very open- minded, and […] professional ” “ If the librarian was LGBTQ, I feel like they might be able to more effectively redirect me to LGBTQ-related resources ”
  • For patient care… Over one third of surveyed health pros say it is easier to consult a medical librarian with LGBTQ health questions now compared to 10 years ago when asking for the care of a patient. 18 THE RESULTS EASIER OVERTHE LAST 10YEARS? 44% Don’t know 37% Easier 12.5% About the same 6.5% Harder n = 120
  • For personal info/for research… Approaching half of surveyed health pros say it is easier to consult a medical librarian with LGBTQ health questions now compared to 10 years ago when asking for personal reasons or for research. 19 THE RESULTS EASIER OVERTHE LAST 10YEARS? 41.5% Don’t know 42% Easier 10% About the same 6.5% Harder n = 120
  • 20 THE RESULTS DISTINCT INFORMATION NEEDS? In your opinion, do LGBTQ health professionals have distinct information needs? 64.5% (2003: 66.6%) Yes 25.6% (2003: 19.6%) No 9.9% Don’t know n = 120 Almost two thirds of respondents believe that LGBTQ health professionals have distinct information needs.
  • 21 THE RESULTS DISTINCT INFORMATION NEEDS… “ The substance abuse rate is so much higher because of additional pain, and I prefer providers who understand that. I don't like to be criticized for being bi, and providers who accept and actively support that are a much better fit for me. I find myself being more honest with them, and therefore feeling more comfortable and getting the best medical care ” “ It is challenging to get information on the specific medical and psychiatric needs and up-to-date research on LGBTQ groups. ”
  • 22 THE RESULTS DISTINCT INFORMATION NEEDS… (#2) “ We need to be able to access information safely (without fear of discrimination/homop hobia) ” “ […] interpersonal violence, abuse, suicide, drug/alcohol use/misuse, homophobi a, heterosexism, family and couple issues ” “ […] LGBTQ needs are particular: question of history, mental health, specific physical health needs and harm reduction etc. ” “ We need access to journals that have not typically been a part of all medical university holdings ”
  • Do online medical resources provide accurate coverage of LGBTQ health issues? 23 THE RESULTS ONLINE MEDICAL RESOURCES 15.8% Yes 55.8% No 28.4% Don’t know n = 120 Well over half of respondents consider that online medical resources do not provide accurate coverage of LGBTQ health issues.
  • 24 THE RESULTS GAPS IN ONLINE RESOURCES… “ If they reference LGBTQ health issues at all, often they are outdated or obviously biased opinions which have yet to catch up to greater societal trends ” “ […] you get a mix of approaches to gay identity or same-sex behaviour - which are not synonymous. Also, sometimes it is difficult to sort through different cultures and socio-political contexts[…]. It sometimes takes quite a bit of effort to push through the weeds to get to an acceptable answer ” “ […] mostly because there is inadequate research on some topics about LGBTQ medicine e.g. the prevalence of suicidal ideation and attempts in adolescent young gay men ” “ Limited resources on gay men (mostly about HIV and sex practices), even fewer regarding lesbian women, and almost none on trans issues ”
  • More appealing 25 THE RESULTS CHATTING ONLINE (patient care) n = 120 39.1% 17.0% 17.0% 39.1% 17.5% Less appealing 39.1% The option of online chat with the librarian is not more attractive whatever the sensitivity of the enquiry.
  • 26 THE RESULTS ONLINE CHAT, SOME COMMENTS… “More convenient for any question, not dependent on LGBTQ needs” “I think I might feel more comfortable communicating via chat in question 2 because anonymity feels safer/less judge-y” “More appealing, only in that I would not have to leave my office or home” “Would help with geographical issues when working in the rural setting”
  • 27 THE RESULTS CHATTING ONLINE (own health/research) More appealing n = 120 43.3% 16.7% 15% 42.5% 17.5% Less appealing 44.2% The same observation applies for personal enquiries!
  • 28 THE RESULTS ONLINE CHAT, MORE COMMENTS… “online saves time” “As a lesbian, I would prefer to talk to another LGBTQ person face-to-face, but if I thought the librarian was straight I might prefer the anonymity of talking online” “I prefer face-to- face discussion” “using "chat" services with librarians is more convenient as I am rarely IN the library, but most often at other locations”
  • 29 THE RESULTS IMPROVING OUR SERVICES In your opinion, are there ways in which the services of medical librarians could be changed to help ensure they are perceived as more LGBTQ-friendly? 39.7% Yes 7.4% No 52.9% Don’t know n = 120
  • 30 THE RESULTS IMPROVING OUR SERVICES “ More comprehensive training around resources, data sources, and needs of LGBTQ individuals ” “ Have knowledge of a broader range of periodicals ” “ The same way any service could be changed to be perceived as more LGBTQ- friendly - visibility and explicitly stating it ” “ By putting resources on the library website that make it clear that LGBT health science information is available ”
  • 31 DISCUSSION WHAT DOESTHIS ALL MEAN? Attitudes have changed significantly but LGBTQ health professionals still show a preference for discussing some queries with an LGBTQ librarian. …BUT, LGBTQ health professionals find it significantly easier to raise these queries with medical librarians than 10 years ago. Online chat does not appear to be a particularly attractive alternative for LGBTQ health pros who may feel less comfortable raising LGBTQ health information requests.
  • 32 DISCUSSION WHAT DOESTHIS ALL MEAN? LGBTQ health professionals have specific information needs and a perception that these are not adequately covered by available resources. Many health professionals in this population would like to see a broader range of journals for example. There are various ways that libraries may like to consider implementing to ensure that we serve all sectors of our target population.
  • • Continue data analysis • Carry on with email semi- structured interviews • Publish 33 FUTURE RESEARCH NEXT STEPS
  • CREDITS Images “Colour Pencils-1” by David Blaikie (david.nikonvscanon) – Flickr “Raised Hand” from blogs@CBU (blogs.cbu.ca/?p=1589) References Dohrenwend, A. (2009). Perspective: A grand challenge to academic medicine: speak out on gay rights. Academic Medicine, 84(6), 788–792. doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181a3de9c Eliason, M. J., Dibble, S. L., & Robertson, P. A. (2011). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) physicians' experiences in the workplace. Journal of Homosexuality, 58(10), 1355–1371. doi:10.1080/00918369.2011.614902 Fikar, C. R., & Keith, L. (2004). Information needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered health care professionals: results of an Internet survey. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 92(1), 56–65. Schuster, M. A. (2012). On being gay in medicine. Academic Pediatrics, 12(2), 75-8 34
  • Questions?