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Digital technology for museum learning oxford 2 mar 12 reduced for uploading

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Slides used by Martin Bazley during training day for Skills for the Future trainees and others in the Education Studio at Ashmolean Museum on 2 March 2012

Slides used by Martin Bazley during training day for Skills for the Future trainees and others in the Education Studio at Ashmolean Museum on 2 March 2012

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  • blessing_11111@yahoo.com

    My name is Blessing
    i am a young lady with a kind and open heart,
    I enjoy my life,but life can't be complete if you don't have a person to share it
    with. blessing_11111@yahoo.com

    Hoping To Hear From You
    Yours Blessing
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  • blessing_11111@yahoo.com

    My name is Blessing
    i am a young lady with a kind and open heart,
    I enjoy my life,but life can't be complete if you don't have a person to share it
    with. blessing_11111@yahoo.com

    Hoping To Hear From You
    Yours Blessing
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
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  • Resources – what can you do what are the quick wins for teachers, in online provision? How do you build a case for spending time on online? Feedback from Ts to demo demand; evaluate resources produced to demo being used and inform future development, etc Make it part of someone’s job description rather than add on – build up gradually, convince colleagues Selection of images is key
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Transcript

    • 1. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY FORMUSEUM LEARNINGAshmolean Museum2 March 2012Martin Bazley (Martin Bazley & Associates)
    • 2. Martin BazleyPreviously• Teaching (7 yrs)• Science Museum, London, Learning Unit, Internet Projects (7yrs)• E-Learning Officer, MLA South East (3yrs)
    • 3. Martin Bazley• Currently• Vice Chair, DLNET (was E-Learning Group for Museums, Lib, Archives)• Consultancy, websites, training, user testing, evaluation … Martin Bazley & Associates www.martinbazley.com
    • 4. Digital technology for museum learning1015 Museum websites and new media – What is ‘new media’? – Museum website functions1115 – 1130 Break1130 Creating online content – How people use the web – About creating online content1230 – 1315 Lunch
    • 5. 1315 Online resources for schools and video for the web – The online learning resources market: – Video for websites1430 – 1445 Break1445 Crit room and surgery – Who is my website for? What will it offer this audience? How, when, where, why – Review examples / simulated user testing1630 Feedback forms and close
    • 6. Sharpen your mice... starter for 10• What ways can you think of, in which digital technology can be used to engage and work with young people?• What’s the difference between new media and social media? Why ‘new’ and why ‘social’?
    • 7. Sharpen your mice... starter for 10• What social media services have you heard of, and what do you know about them?• Which is more popular with young people, MySpace, Facebook, LinkedIn or WordPress?• What is RSS?
    • 8. Sharpen your mice... starter for 10• What is a blog and where does the word come from?• What is a podcast and where does the word come from?
    • 9. Sharpen your mice... starter for 10• When using Facebook to work with young people, it is important to.... CommonCraft videos Online audiences site Podcast examples?
    • 10. Header inc banner – establishes visual identity Main navigation – contents summary, links to sections Section (context- sensitive) Right hand column – navigation – links to relevantcontents summary items within site, Main content area and links sometimes outside it
    • 11. Website exampleshttp://eastanglianlife.org.uk/discover/http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/London-Wall/Visiting-us/http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit-us/booking/index.htmlhttp://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/educators/plan_and_book_a_visit/book_a_visit.aspxhttp://www.vam.ac.uk/http://www.amazon.co.uk/http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/
    • 12. Elements of online learning resources These are the firstIncreasing cost and complexity things to provide, and Image(s) + caption(s) do not require high Most useful for teachers levels of IT expertise or Key question(s) / short activities investment Background teacher notes / pupil activity sheets Zoomable images Video can be done quite easily The others will mean investment of Video money and /or expert time Interactive More complex functionality This is good news. Maybe creating online learning resources is not so difficult?
    • 13. We are all different and some people like to read all the text on a web page before deciding what to do next, even though a lot of it might be pretty redundant but most people – or at least most regular users of the web – rather than reading through them in detail just scan the web pages they are using, or at least the ones where they are still trying to work out where to go next
    • 14. • Users wont read your text thoroughly word-by-word. Exhaustive reading is rare, especially when browsing. Yes, some people will read more, but most wont.
    • 15. • The first two paragraphs must state the most important information. Theres some hope that users will actually read this material – though theyll probably read more of the first paragraph than the second.
    • 16. • Start subheadings, paragraphs, and bullet points with information- carrying words that users will notice when scanning down the left side of your content in the final stem of their F- behaviour. Theyll read the third word on a line much less often than the first two words.
    • 17. If they have to work at it for example if they cannot see what they are looking for, or if it doesn’t make sense to them at first glancethen most people – or at least many people who do a lot of searching or browsing on the web just decide that this particular site is not for them, and anyway they have a long list of other search results or ideas to try and so they go elsewhere
    • 18. Exercise: Make this web page better
    • 19. About website structure,ways people use the web andimplications for writing for the web
    • 20. Certain types of websites impose linear user journeys: TheTrainline.com Cinema ticket bookings Self assessment tax return online
    • 21. In most websites, although there are some linear elements …
    • 22. … people like to have other pathways available to them…
    • 23. … and most journeys are very non-linear
    • 24. Also, most people reach your website via GoogleOnly 20% arrive at your website on the home page
    • 25. Most may not have had your site in mind when searching
    • 26. 30% of them go to home page to ‘try and work out what this site is about’
    • 27. So each page on the site must quickly:• engage users and• give sense of what site is about – otherwise most will leave
    • 28. ‘Writing for the web’ is not just about text…
    • 29. … but also choosing the right images … layouts … graphical look and feel …website structure etc etc
    • 30. Key point of Image clearlyparagraph/ related to text section Broken into short paras
    • 31. Short video guides• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoU2yANNxRs&e• Writing web headlines http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBg7dJIfHM0
    • 32. Header inc banner – establishes visual identity Main navigation – contents summary, links to sections Section (context- sensitive) Right hand column – navigation – links to relevantcontents summary items within site, Main content area and links sometimes outside it
    • 33. Home page: key functions• Offer overview: – Show user what the site can do for them – Show user what is in the site: • The structure at a glance • Content highlights or samples• Engagement: – make user want to continue browsing – www.manchestergalleries.org/
    • 34. Article page: key functions• Engage the user – make them want to consume the article• Signposting: – Show user what else is nearby in the site • The structure at a glance – Show user what else the site offers them – www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=73 – www.manchestergalleries.org/
    • 35. Short writing exercises
    • 36. Short writing exercises
    • 37. Home page: key functions• Offer overview: – Show user what the site can do for them – Show user what is in the site: • The structure at a glance • Content highlights or samples• Engagement: – make user want to continue browsing
    • 38. Article page: key functions• Engage the user – make them want to consume the article• Signposting: – Show user what else is nearby in the site • The structure at a glance – Show user what else the site offers them – www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=73 – www.manchestergalleries.org/
    • 39. Task: create some online content
    • 40. Banner Decide where in the site this will be Write a few Short, clear summaryThis is an Add a title sentences.ARTICLE Add subheadingpage Few more sentences
    • 41. Where in the site is this? Title Add a summary? Links to related points elsewhere Each ‘promo’ in this site needs Title Image? One-line descnThis is a SECTIONpage - one of theselinks goes to thearticle page
    • 42. Interactive whiteboards
    • 43. Roles of IWB… at different points in the lesson / learning cycle – Starter – Main – Plenary
    • 44. Interactive” means• “lots of things moving on screen, clickable, automatic response, quizzes etc• interaction between students, teacher and screen – activities, conversation, cognitive engagement, etcfirst meaning used mainly by companies trying to market whiteboards, software etc as ‘interactive’second used mainly by educators
    • 45. Resources - examples• Bedford Bytes• Britons at War• Ashmolean sites• Tate Tools• Museum Network Artworks• National Portrait Gallery Mary Seacole• National Gallery• Museum of London Fire of London
    • 46. Resources for use on whiteboards - examples• Wartime in Bedford• http://www.movinghere.org.uk/schools/defaul• www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid= (Passion for Fashion)• http://www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?jour (Ruskin)• Ford Madox Brown MAG
    • 47. Some examples– http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/british-natura– http://www.manchestergalleries.org/the-collection– www.seayourhistory.org.uk/content/view/39/77/– http://www.portsmouth.gov.uk/business/2781.htm
    • 48. More information:Well presented advice on usability including writing for the web, with a useful little self test option• http://usability.coi.gov.uk/• A one page structured set of advice: http://www.webdesignfromscratch.com/copyw
    • 49. More information (2)• Simple to follow good practice list:http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus/whoweare/brand• Articles to read and help you develop skillshttp://www.writingfortheweb.co.uk/artwrite.htm• Classic advice from usability guru Jakob Nielsen http://www.useit.com/papers/webwriting/
    • 50. Elements of online learning resources These are the firstIncreasing cost and complexity things to provide, and Image(s) + caption(s) do not require high Most useful for teachers levels of IT expertise or Key question(s) / short activities investment Background teacher notes / pupil activity sheets Zoomable images Video can be done quite easily The others will mean investment of Video money and /or expert time Interactive More complex functionality
    • 51. Two contrasting examples of resource developmentBoth produced for Ashmolean Museum- Flash interactive- John Ruskin resources including video
    • 52. Example 1: Brighton Then & Now whiteboard interactive • Funded through Take One… Picture project • Repurposing an existing activity • Focus on interactive element – buying in expertise not available in-house • Opportunity to review and improve content • Opportunity to involve local teachers • Time consuming (attention to detail important), but great results!Brighton Then and Now screenshot • Attempts to create interactives in househttp://www.ashmolean.org/education/resources/resources2011/interactives/Brighton less successful
    • 53. Take One Picture interactive: pros+ An ‘interactive’ resource often seems more attractive.+ Offers a richer experience around each painting.+ Activity is closely guided, so can be used even by inexperienced teachers.
    • 54. Take One Picture interactive: cons- Relatively expensive to produce.- Quite limited in application – teachers cannot adjust to suit their needs.- Because most images / assets are ‘wrapped’ in Flash, this type of resource is sometimes less findable via Google etc.
    • 55. Example 2: ‘Through Ruskin’s Eyes’ learning package • Funded through AHRC grant - small component of bigger project • Starting from scratch - defining concept very time consuming • Opportunity to work closely with local school on in depth project • Heavy demands on education staff time – (esp Joint Museums Art Education Officer)‘Through Ruskin’s Eyes’ screenshot • Opportunity to try out new approaches eg video clipshttp://educationonline.ashmolean.org/ruskin/ ‘solution’ for education staff to •Resulted in create teaching and learning packages (requiring minimal help from busy ICT team)
    • 56. John Ruskin resource: pros+ Provides images, videos and straightforward activities that students or teachers can use in their own way.+ Less expensive to develop+ More likely to be found via Google etc+ Used WordPress.com for prototyping and Wordpress.org for the final site – with the option to produce more as required
    • 57. John Ruskin resource: cons- Does not have the ‘wow’ factor of an ‘interactive’
    • 58. Overall comparisonTOP: approach quite well defined so easier to see the potential. More constrained.Ruskin: more specialist audience so more in depth activities. Working with partners creative but increases complexity.
    • 59. Wordpress.com vs Wordpress.orgWordpress.com is particularly quick to get going – great for developing and trialling resources, or just playing around with ideasWordpress.org needs installation and a little maintenance, but offers a stable website solution
    • 60. Making websites - CMSshttp://wordpress.com - free website creation service (pay extra for features like own domain name etc). All hosting and upgrading etc is done for you
    • 61. Making websites - CMSshttp://wordpress.org - free website creation service – like .com except you have to install it on your server and you are responsible for updating, hosting costs, etc
    • 62. Making websites - CMSswww.contentcurator.net - free open- source CMS specially developed for cultural and heritage sector. Powerful and easy to use e.g. in-place editing
    • 63. Making websites - CMSswww.cmsmadesimple.org - free website creation service – you install it on your server and you are responsible for updating, hosting costs, etc - very similar to wordpress.org
    • 64. Video for the webReasons to use it• Moving images have much more impact, tend to attract more interest• Demonstrate evidence of engagement with school groups / other learners• Good medium for explaining things, stimulating discussion etc
    • 65. Video for the webEquipment, technical etc• Video camera – choose something simple without too many controls (RIP Kodak Zi8 ...)• Use an external microphone – sound quality is biggest factor in overall quality.• Tripod probably a good idea• Think about lighting, background noise etc
    • 66. Video for the webStoryboarding• Plan for a short video (for the web, for schools, for general interest)• You can always add more clips, and present them as ‘chapters’ in a sequence• Imagine shooting it and play it back in your mind – then revise the storyboard
    • 67. Video for the webEditing• Most time consuming element! Many hours, for short clips, until more experienced.• Free programs fine – iMovie (Mac), MovieMaker (Windows), and search online• ‘cutaways’ is main additional feature you might need – Adobe Premiere Elements?
    • 68. Video for the webSharing and uploading• YouTube, Vimeo etc – these handle all the format conversion for you and provide streaming service• Upload file to website – can be good (YouTube blocked in some schools) but more technical fiddling required.
    • 69. Developing a learning resource: iterative review your content   curriculum (find a match) CheckLearning activities   Learning outcomes (find a match) Does it match your audience’s specific needs? If so TEST - and then amend
    • 70. ‘What have museums ever done for us?’The main value added for teachers working online isselection of suitable materialwith learning activities and outcomes in mindFocus resources on editorial, evaluation and testingrather than technical functionality
    • 71. Elements of online learning resourcesIncreasing cost and complexity Image(s) + caption(s) Most useful for teachers Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes / pupil activity sheets Zoomable images Video Interactive More complex functionality
    • 72. ReflectionHow can you create effective learning resources on a limited budget?What are the quick wins for teachers, in online provision?How do you build a case for investing in the development of online resources?
    • 73. Website users
    • 74. Website users• Who uses your website?• Why would they want to use it?• How would they find it?• What do they get out of it?• What do they dislike about it?
    • 75. How do you get it right for everyone?• Answer:• You can’t get it right for everyone.• You have to make choices, and stick to them:• Who is it for?• What..• How…
    • 76. Who for…? What for?How will they use it?
    • 77. Learning resource: iterative planning content   curriculum (find a match)Learning activities   Learning outcomes (find a match) Filtered by your specific audience needs
    • 78. Who for…? What for?How will they use it?
    • 79. Who for what for ...• Who for? (audience) Need to be clear from start • mum + 2 children looking for something to do this weekend • teachers of yr5/6 in local area with whiteboards • men interested in gadgets
    • 80. Who for what for ...• What ‘real-world’ outcomes? What will they do as a result of using the site? • make a donation • plan a visit to a museum • buy a train ticket • think differently about learning disability
    • 81. Who for what for ...• How will they use it? (user experience) What do they actually do on the site? • browse and read articles • working alone or in pairs? (learning resources) • lean forward or sit back? • Browsing, following, searching…• Also Where, When and Why?
    • 82. Examples of teacher feedback• Vimeo videos• http://vimeo.com/18888798 Key ideas• http://vimeo.com/18892401 Lesson starter• http://vimeo.com/18867252 Timesaver
    • 83. Who for what for ...• Website appraisal – For each example note first impressions• Who is it for?• What does it offer them?• How will they use it?
    • 84. Crit room
    • 85. Crit roomSimulated user testing- Learn how user testing works- Get feedback on specifics of websitesRemember this is just a simulation of real user testing!
    • 86. Crit room sites
    • 87. More information / advice / ideas Martin Bazley 0780 3580 737 www.martinbazley.com