Creating online learning resources for schools <ul><li>Ulster Museum </li></ul><ul><li>28 September 2011 </li></ul><ul><li...
Martin Bazley <ul><li>Previously </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching (7 yrs) </li></ul><ul><li>Science Museum, London,  Learning Un...
Martin Bazley <ul><li>Currently </li></ul><ul><li>Vice Chair, DLNet (was E-Learning Group for Museums, Lib, Archives) </li...
 
Martin Bazley & Associates  BBC / Public Catalogue Foundation Your Paintings project Consulting on user interface Consulti...
Martin Bazley & Associates  Ford Madox Brown  Work   schools   interactive with embedded video Consulting on content and u...
Martin Bazley & Associates  John Ruskin Elements of Drawing website Consulting on content and user interface User testing ...
Martin Bazley & Associates  The National Archives Cabinet Papers project Consulting on content and user interface for scho...
Martin Bazley & Associates  Development of small to medium sized museum websites Using WordPress or working with web devel...
Martin Bazley & Associates  Training Writing for the web Developing online resources Planning online audience research and...
Elements of online learning resources Image(s) + caption(s) Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes  /...
<ul><li>Why do we have to learn to write for the web?  Isn’t it just writing like any other kind of material?  </li></ul>
<ul><li>Users don’t always ‘get’ what we are offering: </li></ul><ul><li>a real–world analogy </li></ul>
Even a slight difference in viewpoints… … can cause real problems for users
 
 
 
 
 
 
In a conflict between  visual affordance … … and  written instructions visual affordance  almost always wins
<ul><li>Another example </li></ul>
Hmm… the button is really small… And it’s not green… You can’t push it in… Just push the big green button by the gate
Huge green button
<ul><li>So what is the point of all this? </li></ul>
<ul><li>Web users also don’t get it  </li></ul>
<ul><li>People use the web differently… </li></ul>
<ul><li>…  from the way they use books, object labels, magazines, newspapers, information screens, etc </li></ul>
<ul><li>For most people the web is a predominantly  visual  medium </li></ul>
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>We are all different and some people like to read all the text on a web page before deciding what to do next, even...
 
<ul><li>Users won't read your text thoroughly  word-by-word.  Exhaustive reading is rare, especially when browsing.  Yes, ...
<ul><li>The first two paragraphs must state the most important information .  There's some hope that users will actually r...
<ul><li>Start subheadings, paragraphs, and bullet points with information-carrying words  that users will notice  when sca...
<ul><li>If they have to work at it   for example if they cannot see what they are looking for, or if it doesn’t make sense...
<ul><li>Exercise: Make this web page better </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>About website structure,  ways people use the web and implications for writing for the web </li></ul>
<ul><li>Certain types of websites impose  linear user journeys:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>TheTrainline.com </li></ul></ul><ul...
 
<ul><li>In most websites, although there are some linear elements …  </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>…  people like to have other pathways available to them… </li></ul>
<ul><li>…  and most journeys are  very non-linear </li></ul>
<ul><li>Also, most people reach your website via Google </li></ul><ul><li>Only 20% arrive at your website on the home page...
<ul><li>Most may not have had your site in mind when searching </li></ul>
<ul><li>30% of them go to home page to ‘try and work out what this site is about’ </li></ul>
<ul><li>So each page on the site must quickly:  </li></ul><ul><li>engage users  and   </li></ul><ul><li>give sense of what...
<ul><li>‘ Writing for the web’ is not just about text… </li></ul>
<ul><li>…  but also choosing the right images </li></ul><ul><li>…  layouts </li></ul><ul><li>…  graphical look and feel </...
Key point of paragraph/ section Image clearly related to text Broken into short paras
Short video guides <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoU2yANNxRs&eurl=http://inside.123-reg.co.uk/archives/video-writ...
Home page: key functions <ul><li>Offer overview:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what the site can do for them </li></ul>...
Article page: key functions <ul><li>Engage the user – make them want to consume the article </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting:...
<ul><li>Short writing exercises </li></ul>
<ul><li>Short writing exercises </li></ul>
<ul><li>Short writing exercises </li></ul>
Home page: key functions <ul><li>Offer overview:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what the site can do for them </li></ul>...
Article page: key functions <ul><li>Engage the user – make them want to consume the article </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting:...
Task: create some  online content
Decide where in the site this will be  Add a title  Short, clear summary  Write a few sentences.  Add subheading Few more ...
Title Add a summary? Each ‘promo’ needs  Title  Image? One-line descn Links to related points elsewhere in this site Where...
Interactive whiteboards
Roles of IWB <ul><li>…  at different points in the lesson / learning cycle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Starter </li></ul></ul><u...
Interactive ” means <ul><li>“ lots of things moving on screen, clickable, automatic response, quizzes etc </li></ul><ul><l...
Resources - examples  <ul><li>Bedford Bytes  </li></ul><ul><li>Britons at War </li></ul><ul><li>Tate Tools </li></ul><ul><...
Resources for use on whiteboards - examples <ul><li>Wartime in Bedford  </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.movinghere.org.uk/sch...
Some examples <ul><ul><li>http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/british-natural-history/index.html   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Task: create some  online content  -review
Decide where in the site this will be  Add a title  Short, clear summary  Write a few sentences.  Add subheading Few more ...
Title Add a summary? Each ‘promo’ needs  Title  Image? One-line descn Links to related points elsewhere in this site Where...
Home page: key functions <ul><li>Offer overview:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what the site can do for them </li></ul>...
Article page: key functions <ul><li>Engage the user – make them want to consume the article </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting:...
More information: <ul><li>Well presented advice on usability including writing for the web, with a useful little self test...
More information (2) <ul><li>Simple to follow good practice list: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus/whoweare...
Elements of online learning resources Image(s) + caption(s) Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes  /...
Two contrasting examples of resource development <ul><li>Both produced for Ashmolean Museum </li></ul><ul><li>Flash intera...
<ul><li>Funded through Take One… Picture project </li></ul><ul><li>Repurposing an existing activity  </li></ul><ul><li>Foc...
 
Take One Picture interactive: pros <ul><li>An ‘interactive’ resource often seems more attractive.  </li></ul><ul><li>Offer...
Take One Picture interactive: cons <ul><li>Relatively expensive to produce. </li></ul><ul><li>Quite limited in application...
<ul><li>Funded through AHRC grant - small component of bigger project </li></ul><ul><li>Starting from scratch - defining c...
 
 
John Ruskin resource: pros <ul><li>Provides images, videos and straightforward activities that students or teachers can us...
John Ruskin resource: cons <ul><li>Does not have the ‘wow’ factor of an ‘interactive’ </li></ul>
Overall comparison <ul><li>TOP:  approach quite well defined so easier to see the potential.  More constrained. </li></ul>...
Wordpress.com vs Wordpress.org <ul><li>Wordpress.com is particularly quick to get going – great for developing and trialli...
Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>http://wordpress.com   - free website creation service (pay extra for features like own dom...
Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>http://wordpress.org   - free website creation service – like .com except you have to insta...
Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>www.contentcurator.net   - free open-source CMS specially developed for cultural and herita...
Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>www.cmsmadesimple.org  - free website creation service – you install it on your server and ...
<ul><li>Developing a learning resource: iterative review </li></ul><ul><li>your content       curriculum  (find a match)...
‘ What have museums ever done for us?’ The main value added for teachers working online is  selection of suitable material...
Elements of online learning resources Image(s) + caption(s) Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes  /...
<ul><li>Reflection </li></ul><ul><li>How can you create effective learning resources on a limited budget? </li></ul><ul><l...
Website users
Website users <ul><li>Who uses your website?  </li></ul><ul><li>Why would they want to use it?  </li></ul><ul><li>How woul...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
How do you get it right for everyone? <ul><li>Answer: </li></ul><ul><li>You can’t get it right for everyone. </li></ul><ul...
Who for…? What for? How will they use it?
<ul><li>Learning resource: iterative planning </li></ul><ul><li>content       curriculum  (find a match)  </li></ul><ul>...
Who for…? What for? How will they use it?
Who for what for ... <ul><li>Who for?   (audience) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to be clear from start </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Who for what for ... <ul><li>What ‘real-world’ outcomes?   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What will they do as a result of using th...
Who for what for ... <ul><li>How will they use it?   (user experience) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What do they actually  do  on...
Examples of teacher feedback <ul><li>Vimeo videos </li></ul><ul><li>http://vimeo.com/18888798  Key ideas </li></ul><ul><li...
Who for what for ... <ul><li>Website appraisal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For each example note first impressions </li></ul></u...
Agree activity  following  today’s session
Sustaining learning – continue practising! <ul><li>Now:  </li></ul><ul><li>- decide on an achievable task for the next two...
My task <ul><ul><li>Write down what you plan to achieve within two weeks </li></ul></ul>
Crit room
Crit room <ul><ul><li>Simulated user testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn how user testing works </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Crit room sites
Websites for different audiences
Websites for different audiences <ul><li>The following tips are based on  </li></ul><ul><li>numerous evaluation sessions <...
‘ General users’ <ul><li>There is no such thing as a general user </li></ul><ul><li>Are you a general user? </li></ul>
Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>What does the site tell me at a glance? </li></ul><ul><li>genuine enthusiast...
Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>But most will not bother unless something engages them within a few seconds ...
Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>Where is it?  a schematic map on every page, or at least on the home page an...
Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>What’s the rough cost and roughly how long might I/we want to spend there? T...
Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>What kind of experience will I get? I know there will be ‘displays’ – it is ...
Websites for schools <ul><li>‘ Serve the National Curriculum’ or  ‘extend or enhance’? </li></ul><ul><li>‘ enhance’ sounds...
Foundation and KS1 (3-7yrs) <ul><li>Production of materials for this age range is particularly tricky: </li></ul><ul><li>a...
Key Stage 2 ( 7 to 11 years old) <ul><li>keep no of words on each page to a minimum, say 50 in total </li></ul><ul><li>ill...
Key Stage 3  ( 11 to 14 years old) <ul><li>For KS2 a cross-curricular approach is OK (for example they may use the same si...
‘ Lifelong learners’ <ul><li>for (non-specialist) interest level  think of  12 yr olds </li></ul><ul><li>Identify a partic...
Specialist researchers <ul><li>Fact-oriented, less graphics and design, more text and specifically relevant images, with g...
Accessibility tips <ul><li>http://www.w3.org/WAI/ </li></ul><ul><li>Images & animations :  Use the  alt  attribute to desc...
More information / advice / ideas <ul><li>Martin Bazley </li></ul><ul><li>0780 3580 737 </li></ul><ul><li>www.martinbazley...
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Creating online learning resources for schools for uploading

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Slides used during the workshop Creating Online Learning Resources for Schools at Ulster Museum on 28 Sept 2011
Martin Bazley

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  • Resources – what can you do what are the quick wins for teachers, in online provision? How do you build a case for spending time on online? Feedback from Ts to demo demand; evaluate resources produced to demo being used and inform future development, etc Make it part of someone’s job description rather than add on – build up gradually, convince colleagues Selection of images is key
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Instead of What will they do, used to say how will they useit: - nicer symmetry but too easy to dismiss using answer to What for question. Answering one question often helps clarify in respect of another, e.g. sometimes find multiple uses envisaged, which can lead to improved audience definition
  • Creating online learning resources for schools for uploading

    1. 1. Creating online learning resources for schools <ul><li>Ulster Museum </li></ul><ul><li>28 September 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>Martin Bazley (Martin Bazley & Associates) </li></ul>
    2. 2. Martin Bazley <ul><li>Previously </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching (7 yrs) </li></ul><ul><li>Science Museum, London, Learning Unit, Internet Projects (7yrs) </li></ul><ul><li>E-Learning Officer, MLA South East (3yrs) </li></ul>
    3. 3. Martin Bazley <ul><li>Currently </li></ul><ul><li>Vice Chair, DLNet (was E-Learning Group for Museums, Lib, Archives) </li></ul><ul><li>Consultancy, websites, training, user testing, evaluation … Martin Bazley & Associates www.martinbazley.com </li></ul>
    4. 5. Martin Bazley & Associates BBC / Public Catalogue Foundation Your Paintings project Consulting on user interface Consulting on online survey User testing
    5. 6. Martin Bazley & Associates Ford Madox Brown Work schools interactive with embedded video Consulting on content and user interface User testing (classroom-based) (Also worked on redevelopment of main website)
    6. 7. Martin Bazley & Associates John Ruskin Elements of Drawing website Consulting on content and user interface User testing – HE and Ruskin specialists (Also development of schools resource)
    7. 8. Martin Bazley & Associates The National Archives Cabinet Papers project Consulting on content and user interface for schools User testing (classroom-based)
    8. 9. Martin Bazley & Associates Development of small to medium sized museum websites Using WordPress or working with web developer associate User testing etc included
    9. 10. Martin Bazley & Associates Training Writing for the web Developing online resources Planning online audience research and impact assessment Video for the web Podcasting – planning, production, promotion Social media And more – anything digital
    10. 11. Elements of online learning resources Image(s) + caption(s) Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes / pupil activity sheets Zoomable images  Video Interactive More complex functionality Increasing cost and complexity Most useful for teachers This is good news. Maybe there is no need to learn how to create online learning resources after all? These are the first things to provide, and do not require high levels of IT expertise or investment Video can be done quite easily The others will mean investment of money and /or expert time
    11. 12. <ul><li>Why do we have to learn to write for the web? Isn’t it just writing like any other kind of material? </li></ul>
    12. 13. <ul><li>Users don’t always ‘get’ what we are offering: </li></ul><ul><li>a real–world analogy </li></ul>
    13. 14. Even a slight difference in viewpoints… … can cause real problems for users
    14. 21. In a conflict between visual affordance … … and written instructions visual affordance almost always wins
    15. 22. <ul><li>Another example </li></ul>
    16. 23. Hmm… the button is really small… And it’s not green… You can’t push it in… Just push the big green button by the gate
    17. 24. Huge green button
    18. 25. <ul><li>So what is the point of all this? </li></ul>
    19. 26. <ul><li>Web users also don’t get it </li></ul>
    20. 27. <ul><li>People use the web differently… </li></ul>
    21. 28. <ul><li>… from the way they use books, object labels, magazines, newspapers, information screens, etc </li></ul>
    22. 29. <ul><li>For most people the web is a predominantly visual medium </li></ul>
    23. 34. <ul><li>We are all different and some people like to read all the text on a web page before deciding what to do next, even though a lot of it might be pretty redundant but most people – or at least most regular users of the web – rather than reading through them in detail just scan the web pages they are using, or at least the ones where they are still trying to work out where to go next </li></ul>
    24. 36. <ul><li>Users won't read your text thoroughly word-by-word. Exhaustive reading is rare, especially when browsing. Yes, some people will read more, but most won't. </li></ul>
    25. 37. <ul><li>The first two paragraphs must state the most important information . There's some hope that users will actually read this material – though they'll probably read more of the first paragraph than the second. </li></ul>
    26. 38. <ul><li>Start subheadings, paragraphs, and bullet points with information-carrying words that users will notice when scanning down the left side of your content in the final stem of their F-behaviour. They'll read the third word on a line much less often than the first two words. </li></ul>
    27. 39. <ul><li>If they have to work at it for example if they cannot see what they are looking for, or if it doesn’t make sense to them at first glance then most people – or at least many people who do a lot of searching or browsing on the web just decide that this particular site is not for them, and anyway they have a long list of other search results or ideas to try and so they go elsewhere </li></ul>
    28. 40. <ul><li>Exercise: Make this web page better </li></ul>
    29. 42. <ul><li>About website structure, ways people use the web and implications for writing for the web </li></ul>
    30. 43. <ul><li>Certain types of websites impose linear user journeys: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>TheTrainline.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cinema ticket bookings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self assessment tax return online </li></ul></ul>
    31. 45. <ul><li>In most websites, although there are some linear elements … </li></ul>
    32. 47. <ul><li>… people like to have other pathways available to them… </li></ul>
    33. 48. <ul><li>… and most journeys are very non-linear </li></ul>
    34. 49. <ul><li>Also, most people reach your website via Google </li></ul><ul><li>Only 20% arrive at your website on the home page </li></ul>
    35. 50. <ul><li>Most may not have had your site in mind when searching </li></ul>
    36. 51. <ul><li>30% of them go to home page to ‘try and work out what this site is about’ </li></ul>
    37. 52. <ul><li>So each page on the site must quickly: </li></ul><ul><li>engage users and </li></ul><ul><li>give sense of what site is about – otherwise most will leave </li></ul>
    38. 53. <ul><li>‘ Writing for the web’ is not just about text… </li></ul>
    39. 54. <ul><li>… but also choosing the right images </li></ul><ul><li>… layouts </li></ul><ul><li>… graphical look and feel </li></ul><ul><li>… website structure </li></ul><ul><li>etc etc </li></ul>
    40. 55. Key point of paragraph/ section Image clearly related to text Broken into short paras
    41. 56. Short video guides <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoU2yANNxRs&eurl=http://inside.123-reg.co.uk/archives/video-writing-your-web-copy </li></ul><ul><li>Writing web headlines http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBg7dJIfHM0 </li></ul>
    42. 57. Home page: key functions <ul><li>Offer overview: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what the site can do for them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what is in the site: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The structure at a glance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Content highlights or samples </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Engagement: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>make user want to continue browsing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.manchestergalleries.org/ </li></ul></ul>
    43. 58. Article page: key functions <ul><li>Engage the user – make them want to consume the article </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what else is nearby in the site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The structure at a glance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what else the site offers them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=73 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.manchestergalleries.org/ </li></ul></ul>
    44. 59. <ul><li>Short writing exercises </li></ul>
    45. 60. <ul><li>Short writing exercises </li></ul>
    46. 61. <ul><li>Short writing exercises </li></ul>
    47. 62. Home page: key functions <ul><li>Offer overview: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what the site can do for them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what is in the site: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The structure at a glance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Content highlights or samples </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Engagement: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>make user want to continue browsing </li></ul></ul>
    48. 63. Article page: key functions <ul><li>Engage the user – make them want to consume the article </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what else is nearby in the site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The structure at a glance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what else the site offers them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=73 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.manchestergalleries.org/ </li></ul></ul>
    49. 64. Task: create some online content
    50. 65. Decide where in the site this will be Add a title Short, clear summary Write a few sentences. Add subheading Few more sentences Banner This is an ARTICLE page
    51. 66. Title Add a summary? Each ‘promo’ needs Title Image? One-line descn Links to related points elsewhere in this site Where in the site is this? This is a SECTION page - one of these links goes to the article page
    52. 67. Interactive whiteboards
    53. 68. Roles of IWB <ul><li>… at different points in the lesson / learning cycle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Starter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Main </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plenary </li></ul></ul>
    54. 69. Interactive ” means <ul><li>“ lots of things moving on screen, clickable, automatic response, quizzes etc </li></ul><ul><li>interaction between students, teacher and screen – activities, conversation, cognitive engagement, etc </li></ul><ul><li>first meaning used mainly by companies trying to market whiteboards, software etc as ‘interactive’ </li></ul><ul><li>second used mainly by educators </li></ul>
    55. 70. Resources - examples <ul><li>Bedford Bytes </li></ul><ul><li>Britons at War </li></ul><ul><li>Tate Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Museum Network Artworks </li></ul><ul><li>National Portrait Gallery Mary Seacole </li></ul><ul><li>National Gallery </li></ul><ul><li>Museum of London Fire of London </li></ul>
    56. 71. Resources for use on whiteboards - examples <ul><li>Wartime in Bedford </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.movinghere.org.uk/schools/default.htm </li></ul><ul><li>www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=409 (Passion for Fashion) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=318 (Ruskin) </li></ul><ul><li>Ford Madox Brown MAG </li></ul>
    57. 72. Some examples <ul><ul><li>http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/british-natural-history/index.html </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.manchestergalleries.org/the-collections/highlights-of-the-collection/narrativeobject.php?irn=876 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.seayourhistory.org.uk/content/view/39/77/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.portsmouth.gov.uk/business/2781.html </li></ul></ul>
    58. 73. Task: create some online content -review
    59. 74. Decide where in the site this will be Add a title Short, clear summary Write a few sentences. Add subheading Few more sentences Banner This is an ARTICLE page
    60. 75. Title Add a summary? Each ‘promo’ needs Title Image? One-line descn Links to related points elsewhere in this site Where in the site is this? This is a SECTION page - one of these links goes to the article page
    61. 76. Home page: key functions <ul><li>Offer overview: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what the site can do for them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what is in the site: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The structure at a glance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Content highlights or samples </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Engagement: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>make user want to continue browsing </li></ul></ul>
    62. 77. Article page: key functions <ul><li>Engage the user – make them want to consume the article </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what else is nearby in the site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The structure at a glance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show user what else the site offers them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.mylearning.org/overview.asp?journeyid=73 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.manchestergalleries.org/ </li></ul></ul>
    63. 78. More information: <ul><li>Well presented advice on usability including writing for the web, with a useful little self test option </li></ul><ul><li>http://usability.coi.gov.uk/ </li></ul><ul><li>  A one page structured set of advice: http://www.webdesignfromscratch.com/copywriting/writing-for-the-web/ </li></ul>
    64. 79. More information (2) <ul><li>Simple to follow good practice list: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.jisc.ac.uk/aboutus/whoweare/brand/webwriting.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>Articles to read and help you develop skills </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.writingfortheweb.co.uk/artwrite.html </li></ul><ul><li>  Classic advice from usability guru Jakob Nielsen http://www.useit.com/papers/webwriting/ </li></ul>
    65. 80. Elements of online learning resources Image(s) + caption(s) Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes / pupil activity sheets Zoomable images  Video Interactive More complex functionality Increasing cost and complexity Most useful for teachers These are the first things to provide, and do not require high levels of IT expertise or investment Video can be done quite easily The others will mean investment of money and /or expert time
    66. 81. Two contrasting examples of resource development <ul><li>Both produced for Ashmolean Museum </li></ul><ul><li>Flash interactive </li></ul><ul><li>John Ruskin resources including video </li></ul>
    67. 82. <ul><li>Funded through Take One… Picture project </li></ul><ul><li>Repurposing an existing activity </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on interactive element – buying in expertise not available in-house </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to review and improve content </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to involve local teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Time consuming (attention to detail important), but great results! </li></ul><ul><li>Attempts to create interactives in house less successful </li></ul>Example 1: Brighton Then & Now whiteboard interactive Brighton Then and Now screenshot http://www.ashmolean.org/education/resources/resources2011/interactives/Brighton/Brighton.html
    68. 84. Take One Picture interactive: pros <ul><li>An ‘interactive’ resource often seems more attractive. </li></ul><ul><li>Offers a richer experience around each painting. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity is closely guided, so can be used even by inexperienced teachers. </li></ul>
    69. 85. Take One Picture interactive: cons <ul><li>Relatively expensive to produce. </li></ul><ul><li>Quite limited in application – teachers cannot adjust to suit their needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Because most images / assets are ‘wrapped’ in Flash, this type of resource is sometimes less findable via Google etc. </li></ul>
    70. 86. <ul><li>Funded through AHRC grant - small component of bigger project </li></ul><ul><li>Starting from scratch - defining concept very time consuming </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to work closely with local school on in depth project </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy demands on education staff time – (esp Joint Museums Art Education Officer) </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity to try out new approaches eg video clips </li></ul><ul><li>Resulted in ‘solution’ for education staff to create teaching and learning packages (requiring minimal help from busy ICT team) </li></ul>Example 2: ‘Through Ruskin’s Eyes’ learning package ‘ Through Ruskin’s Eyes’ screenshot http://educationonline.ashmolean.org/ruskin/
    71. 89. John Ruskin resource: pros <ul><li>Provides images, videos and straightforward activities that students or teachers can use in their own way. </li></ul><ul><li>Less expensive to develop </li></ul><ul><li>More likely to be found via Google etc </li></ul><ul><li>Used WordPress.com for prototyping and Wordpress.org for the final site – with the option to produce more as required </li></ul>
    72. 90. John Ruskin resource: cons <ul><li>Does not have the ‘wow’ factor of an ‘interactive’ </li></ul>
    73. 91. Overall comparison <ul><li>TOP: approach quite well defined so easier to see the potential. More constrained. </li></ul><ul><li>Ruskin: more specialist audience so more in depth activities. Working with partners creative but increases complexity. </li></ul>
    74. 92. Wordpress.com vs Wordpress.org <ul><li>Wordpress.com is particularly quick to get going – great for developing and trialling resources, or just playing around with ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Wordpress.org needs installation and a little maintenance, but offers a stable website solution </li></ul>
    75. 93. Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>http://wordpress.com - free website creation service (pay extra for features like own domain name etc). All hosting and upgrading etc is done for you </li></ul>
    76. 94. Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>http://wordpress.org - free website creation service – like .com except you have to install it on your server and you are responsible for updating, hosting costs, etc </li></ul>
    77. 95. Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>www.contentcurator.net - free open-source CMS specially developed for cultural and heritage sector. Powerful and easy to use e.g. in-place editing </li></ul>
    78. 96. Making websites - CMSs <ul><li>www.cmsmadesimple.org - free website creation service – you install it on your server and you are responsible for updating, hosting costs, etc - very similar to wordpress.org </li></ul>
    79. 97. <ul><li>Developing a learning resource: iterative review </li></ul><ul><li>your content   curriculum (find a match) </li></ul>Check Does it match your audience’s specific needs? If so TEST - and then amend Learning activities   Learning outcomes (find a match)
    80. 98. ‘ What have museums ever done for us?’ The main value added for teachers working online is selection of suitable material with learning activities and outcomes in mind Focus resources on editorial, evaluation and testing rather than technical functionality
    81. 99. Elements of online learning resources Image(s) + caption(s) Key question(s) / short activities Background teacher notes / pupil activity sheets Zoomable images  Video Interactive More complex functionality Increasing cost and complexity Most useful for teachers
    82. 100. <ul><li>Reflection </li></ul><ul><li>How can you create effective learning resources on a limited budget? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the quick wins for teachers, in online provision? </li></ul><ul><li>How do you build a case for investing in the development of online resources? </li></ul>
    83. 101. Website users
    84. 102. Website users <ul><li>Who uses your website? </li></ul><ul><li>Why would they want to use it? </li></ul><ul><li>How would they find it? </li></ul><ul><li>What do they get out of it? </li></ul><ul><li>What do they dislike about it? </li></ul>
    85. 111. How do you get it right for everyone? <ul><li>Answer: </li></ul><ul><li>You can’t get it right for everyone. </li></ul><ul><li>You have to make choices, and stick to them: </li></ul><ul><li>Who is it for? </li></ul><ul><li>What.. </li></ul><ul><li>How… </li></ul>
    86. 112. Who for…? What for? How will they use it?
    87. 113. <ul><li>Learning resource: iterative planning </li></ul><ul><li>content   curriculum (find a match) </li></ul><ul><li>Learning activities   Learning outcomes (find a match) </li></ul><ul><li>Filtered by your specific audience needs </li></ul>
    88. 114. Who for…? What for? How will they use it?
    89. 115. Who for what for ... <ul><li>Who for? (audience) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to be clear from start </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>mum + 2 children looking for something to do this weekend </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>teachers of yr5/6 in local area with whiteboards </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>men interested in gadgets </li></ul></ul></ul>
    90. 116. Who for what for ... <ul><li>What ‘real-world’ outcomes? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What will they do as a result of using the site? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>make a donation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>plan a visit to a museum </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>buy a train ticket </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>think differently about learning disability </li></ul></ul></ul>
    91. 117. Who for what for ... <ul><li>How will they use it? (user experience) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What do they actually do on the site? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>browse and read articles </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>working alone or in pairs? (learning resources) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>lean forward or sit back? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Browsing, following, searching… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Also Where, When and Why ? </li></ul>
    92. 118. Examples of teacher feedback <ul><li>Vimeo videos </li></ul><ul><li>http://vimeo.com/18888798 Key ideas </li></ul><ul><li>http://vimeo.com/18892401 Lesson starter </li></ul><ul><li>http://vimeo.com/18867252 Timesaver </li></ul>
    93. 119. Who for what for ... <ul><li>Website appraisal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For each example note first impressions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Who is it for? </li></ul><ul><li>What does it offer them? </li></ul><ul><li>How will they use it? </li></ul>
    94. 120. Agree activity following today’s session
    95. 121. Sustaining learning – continue practising! <ul><li>Now: </li></ul><ul><li>- decide on an achievable task for the next two weeks </li></ul><ul><li>In two weeks: </li></ul><ul><li>Email your work (however unfinished) to Martin [if progress is slow, ask for help] </li></ul><ul><li>Then: </li></ul><ul><li>- Martin will offer feedback and suggestions </li></ul>
    96. 122. My task <ul><ul><li>Write down what you plan to achieve within two weeks </li></ul></ul>
    97. 123. Crit room
    98. 124. Crit room <ul><ul><li>Simulated user testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn how user testing works </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get feedback on specifics of websites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remember this is just a simulation of real user testing! </li></ul></ul>
    99. 125. Crit room sites
    100. 126. Websites for different audiences
    101. 127. Websites for different audiences <ul><li>The following tips are based on </li></ul><ul><li>numerous evaluation sessions </li></ul><ul><li>numerous user testing sessions </li></ul><ul><li>talking to other people who use websites </li></ul><ul><li>talking to other people who make websites </li></ul>
    102. 128. ‘ General users’ <ul><li>There is no such thing as a general user </li></ul><ul><li>Are you a general user? </li></ul>
    103. 129. Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>What does the site tell me at a glance? </li></ul><ul><li>genuine enthusiasts will stay interested whatever the website looks like, and will spend some time looking around it or phone up for more information if required. </li></ul>
    104. 130. Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>But most will not bother unless something engages them within a few seconds </li></ul><ul><li>The questions people might like answered within a few seconds of arriving on a museum site probably include: </li></ul>
    105. 131. Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>Where is it? a schematic map on every page, or at least on the home page and visit info, would really help in attracting visitors who don’t know the area </li></ul>
    106. 132. Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>What’s the rough cost and roughly how long might I/we want to spend there? This would give me an idea of whether to view it as a place to pop into on the way somewhere or combine it with another attraction; or whether it requires more serious investment of time or money </li></ul>
    107. 133. Adults/families with general interest <ul><li>What kind of experience will I get? I know there will be ‘displays’ – it is a museum! </li></ul><ul><li>but will there be people around to help bring the place alive for me, my spouse, my children or friends? </li></ul><ul><li>– or are there events, or things to do like dressing up in a pilot’s uniform, or games to play, etc? </li></ul>
    108. 134. Websites for schools <ul><li>‘ Serve the National Curriculum’ or ‘extend or enhance’? </li></ul><ul><li>‘ enhance’ sounds good but most teachers want : </li></ul><ul><li>curriculum specific – by all means cross-curricular but with one scheme of work or topic as ‘headline’ (think ‘product byline’) </li></ul><ul><li>ready-to-use – teachers may want to adapt to their own situation (esp second time round), but most will not have time – offer at least one ready to use version </li></ul><ul><li>minimal preparation and with time commitment (preparation time and class time) clearly specified </li></ul><ul><li>flexible/adaptable/extensible where possible </li></ul>
    109. 135. Foundation and KS1 (3-7yrs) <ul><li>Production of materials for this age range is particularly tricky: </li></ul><ul><li>aim at teachers not children, so… </li></ul><ul><li>good bank of images, videos or other mainly visual assets </li></ul><ul><li>think of interactive whiteboards </li></ul>
    110. 136. Key Stage 2 ( 7 to 11 years old) <ul><li>keep no of words on each page to a minimum, say 50 in total </li></ul><ul><li>illustrate key ideas visually as well as verbally and use audio if possible </li></ul><ul><li>do not assume that the teacher can be over their shoulder at all points – so keep the instructions and processes simple </li></ul><ul><li>try to use language, images, ideas, and settings that will appeal to the target audience </li></ul>
    111. 137. Key Stage 3 ( 11 to 14 years old) <ul><li>For KS2 a cross-curricular approach is OK (for example they may use the same site for Geography and Science) but: </li></ul><ul><li>At KS3 cater for a single subject (and scheme of work) </li></ul><ul><li>(Can offer suggestions for cross-curricular working, but remember generally each teacher teachers only one subject each.) </li></ul>
    112. 138. ‘ Lifelong learners’ <ul><li>for (non-specialist) interest level think of 12 yr olds </li></ul><ul><li>Identify a particular audience with specific interests/motivations for using your site </li></ul><ul><li>then focus on constraints to allow successful design to proceed. (In a formal learning setting constraints often implicit in the course, physical set up etc.) </li></ul>
    113. 139. Specialist researchers <ul><li>Fact-oriented, less graphics and design, more text and specifically relevant images, with good search facility </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of specialist researchers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HE students and staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>experts or enthusiasts in this subject area </li></ul></ul>
    114. 140. Accessibility tips <ul><li>http://www.w3.org/WAI/ </li></ul><ul><li>Images & animations : Use the alt attribute to describe the function of each visual. </li></ul><ul><li>Image maps. Use the client-side map and text for hotspots . </li></ul><ul><li>Multimedia. Provide captioning and transcripts of audio , and descriptions of video . </li></ul><ul><li>Hypertext links . Use text that makes sense when read out of context. For example, avoid &quot;click here.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Frames. Use the noframes element and meaningful titles . </li></ul><ul><li>Etc, etc. Also: </li></ul><ul><li>http://diveintoaccessibility.org </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrates real life implications e.g. Javascript </li></ul>
    115. 141. More information / advice / ideas <ul><li>Martin Bazley </li></ul><ul><li>0780 3580 737 </li></ul><ul><li>www.martinbazley.com </li></ul>
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