K to12 ASSESSMENT AND RATING OF LEARNING OUTCOMES
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K to12 ASSESSMENT AND RATING OF LEARNING OUTCOMES

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Great! A huge help. Thanks po! :))
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  • thank so much ..very helpful.....
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  • I need help, yung KPUP ay ilagay din sa TOS, tanong kulang kung e yung product/performance diba OUTPUT/PROJECT yan e ngayon papa ano erereflect sa test question yan para sa summative? e Project nga yan . Clarification lang po.Kasi Inset kasi kami nyan kanina lang at parang hindi mawari namin.
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  • if u had format of k12 class record for secondary pls share to me tnx,,, send to my email ..... maac.ginalyn@yahoo.com
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  • @undefined KPUP- Knowledge Process Understanding Product
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  • To provide sufficient time for mastery of concepts and skills, develop lifelong learners, and prepare graduates for tertiary education, middle-level skills development, employment, and entrepreneurship.
  • Prototype – means exampleRubric is a guide listing specific criteria for grading or scoring academic papers, projects, or tests
  • WHAT WILL I ASSESS – COMPETENCIES (THE ABILITY OR THE SKILL)HOW WILL I ASSES – TOOLS HOW WILL I SCORE – BY MEANS OF RUBRICS
  • FACET - : any of the definable aspects that make up a subject (as of contemplation) or an object (as of consideration)
  • This Facet from the teacher’s point-of view:·       This understanding emerges from providing students with a well-developed and supported theory – “the why,” “the what,” and “the how.”·       Requires through assignments and assessments an explanation of what the students know and solid reasoning to support it.·       The teacher is a tour guide.·       Calls for students to explain answers so that they can justify how they arrived at them and why they are right.·       Makes a purposeful attempt at a better balance between knowledge delivery [teacher and text] and student theory building and testing.·       Builds units around overarching [essential and unit] questions, issues, and problems that demand student theories and explanations, such as those found in problem-based learning and effective hands-on and minds-on programs. Understanding this Facet helps a student to answer the questions:·       Why is that so?·       What explains such events?·       What accounts for such action?·       How can we prove it?·       To what is this connected?·       How does this work?·       What is implied? 
  • This Facet from the Teacher’s Point of View·       Meaning, stories, translations, reading between the lines.·       More concentration on the substance and significance of what is learned.·       Tells students stories of what things are about, the purpose of which is understanding, not explanation.  Recognizes and communicates to students that a good story both enlightens and engages and helps them find meaning rather than just see scattered facts and abstract ideas.  Helps students realize that the best stories can make their lives more understandable and focused.·       Incorporates into instruction narratives, translations, metaphors, images, and artistry: recognizing they provide meaning to the student.·       While teaching relevant facts and theoretical principles, still always asks, “What does it mean?  What is its importance – to you, to us?·       In math and science, more investigation into the importance of particular concepts, facts, theorems, and formulae.·       Helps students recognize that a text or a speaker’s words will always have different valid readings and leads them to an appreciation that all interpretations are bound by the personal, social, cultural, and historical contexts in which they arise.·       Coaches students to organize and contextualize essentially contestable, incompletely verifiable propositions in a disciplined way.·       Appreciates that the challenge in teaching is to bring the text to life by revealing, through study and discussion, that the text speaks to their concerns.·       Is aware that this narrative building is the true meaning of constructivism and that the teacher must avoid trying to test and find a single “right” answer or push a partisan point of view.  Realizes it is counterproductive to hand students pre-packaged “significance” or “interpretations” without letting them work through the problem to where they observe for themselves that these explanations and interpretations are valid.·       Values that learning cannot be primarily or exclusively the process of learning what someone else says is the meaning of something.  To educate students to be able to think for themselves as adults, it is realized the teacher must teach them to build stories and interpretations, not just passively take in official ones. ·       Helps students build knowledge from the inside. Understanding in this facet helps a student answer the questions:·       What doe sit mean?·       Why doe sit matter?·       What of it?·       What does it illustrate or illuminate in human experience?·       How doe sit relate to me?·       What makes sense? This facet from the student’s point of view:·       Interprets by telling meaningful stories.·       Offers appropriate interpretations.·       Provides an enlightening historical or personal dimension to ideas and events.·       Personalizes through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models.·       Brings comprehension to concepts by constructing or quoting stories, descriptions, myths, legends, parables, analogies, etc., and critically reviewing them. 
  • This Facet from the teacher’s point of view:·       Knowledge in context – authentic application.·       Develops in students the ability to sue knowledge in deciding how their thinking and actions should be modified to meet the demands of a particular situation.  Situations are provided that involve matching their ideas or actions to the context.·       Recognizes that student understanding is revealed as performance know-how, the ability to accomplish tasks successfully, with grace under pressure, and with tact.·       Realizes this is a context-dependent understanding requiring the use of new problems and diverse situations in assessment.  The problems used for assessment are as close as possible to real-world situations encountered by real-world situations encountered by real-world people in their real-world jobs and lives.·       Testing of this understanding involves neither repetition of information learned nor performance of practices mastered, but rather the appropriate application of concepts and principles to questions or problems that are newly posed – performance needs to be central to evaluation and instruction. Understanding is this facet helps a student answer the questions:·       How and where can I use this knowledge, skill, process?·       How should my thinking and action be modified to meet the demands of this particular situation? This facet from the student’s point of view:·       Applies and effectively uses and adopts what s/he knows in new situations and diverse contexts with defined audiences, purposes, and situations.·       Has a sufficient grasp of concepts, principles, or skills so that s/he can bring them to bear on new problems and situations, deciding in which ways their present competencies can suffice and in which ways they may require new skills or knowledge. 
  • This Facet from the teacher’s point of view:·       Asks students, “How does it look from another point of view?”  For example, “How would my critic see things?”·       Develops student fluency and flexibility in this understanding by providing them with a clear performance goal and keeping that goal in constant view as different points of view emerge.·       Uses the case method and problem-based learning methods that exemplify this understanding.·       Provides instruction and performance standards that require students to see things from the perspective of the ultimate standards, the various players, and the primary audience – not their own intentions – as they try to solve a particular problem.·       Encourages students in their coursework to ask and answer, “What of it?  What is assumed?  What follows?”·       Promotes the inclusion of explicit opportunities for students to confront alternative theories and diverse points of view regarding the big ideas – able to stand back and see things from a distance.·       Realizes that this critical point of view defines a liberal education rather than the content. Understanding in this facet helps a student answer the questions:·       From whose point of view?·       From which vantage point?·       What is assumed or tacit that needs to be made explicit and considered?·       What is justified or warranted?·       Is there adequate evidence?·       Is it reasonable?·       What are the strengths and weaknesses of the idea?·       Is it plausible? This facet from the student’s point of view:·       Sees and hears points of view through critical eyes and ears; sees the big picture – critical and insightful points of view.·       Knows s/he is not “done” with a project or lesson simply because s/he worked hard, followed directions, and turned in a piece of work from a single point of view – his/her own.·       Grasps the points of view behind teacher and textbook pronouncements.·       Understands how ideas look from different vantage points.·       Takes multiple points of view.·       Ability to shift viewpoint and takes into account diverse, yet credible, perspectives. 
  • This facet from the teacher’s point of view:·       Walking in another’s shoes.·       Helps students find value in what others might find odd, alien, or implausible.·       Facilitates for students an understanding of another person, people, or culture.·       Provides assignments where students must perceive sensitively on the basis of prior direct experience.·       Presents students with actual or simulated occurrences of the concepts to be learned.·       Confronts students deliberately with strange or alien texts, experiences, and ideas to see if they can get beyond what is off-putting about the work.·       Makes it possible for students to see from inside another person’s worldview as s/he embraces the insights that can be found in the subjective and aesthetic realm.·       Helps students find what is plausible, sensible, or meaningful in the ideas and actions of others – often resulting in a change of heart and mutual respect.·       Grasps that learning needs to be more experiential, more geared toward making students directly confront the effects – and affect – of decisions, ideas, theories, and problems.·       Recognizes that understanding through empathy implies an existential or experiential prerequisite.·       Realizes that this understanding in the interpersonal sense suggests not merely an intellectual change of mind for the student but also a significant change of heart. Understanding in this facet helps a student answer the questions:·       How does it seem to you?·       What do they see that I don’t?·       What do I need to experience if I am to understand?·       What was the artist or performer feeling, seeing, and trying to make me feel and see? This facet from the student’s point of view:·       Finds and communicates what is plausible, sensible, or meaningful in the ideas and actions of others.·       Gets “inside the skin” of a person, a literary character, historical figure, noted thinker, and experience, or a work of art to discover purposes, motives, and feelings.·       Moves beyond the odd, alien, seemingly weird opinions or people to find what is meaningful in them.·       Distinguishes and feels historical occurrences and concerns as they were experienced by people of the time, rather than how they might be experienced in the present. 
  • This facet from the teacher’s point of view:·       Wisdom, “knowing thyself,” aware of prejudice.·       Self-knowledge demands that a teacher help students self-consciously question their understandings to advance them.·       Designs assignments and assessments that require self-reflection about and examination of intellectual preconceptions, and implicit beliefs.·       Coaches students in the discipline of seeking and finding the inevitable blind spots or oversights in their thinking and in having the courage to face uncertainty and inconsistencies lurking underneath effective habits, naïve confidence, strong beliefs, and worldviews that only seem complete and final.·       Grasps that students, to understand the world, must first understand themselves.  Through self-knowledge they also understand what they do not understand.·       Recognizes that metacognition [thinking about our thinking to improve our thinking] refers to self-knowledge about how students think and why, and comprehends the relationship between their preferred methods of learning and their understanding.·       Pays greater attention to the job of teaching and assessing self-reflection, metacognition, in its broadest sense.·       Teaches and assesses intellectual honesty through student self-assessment. Understanding in this facet helps a student answer these questions:·       How does who I am shape my views?·       What are the limits of my understanding?·       What are my blind spots?·       What am I prone to misunderstand because of prejudice, habit, or style? This facet from the student’s point of view:·       Perceives the personal style, prejudices, projections, and habits of mind that both shape and impede his/her own understanding.·       Aware of what s/he does not understand and why understanding is so hard.·       Possesses and demonstrates the wisdom to know his/her own ignorance and how his/her patterns of thought and action inform as well as prejudice understanding.·       Demonstrates the capacity to self-assess and self-regulate.
  • INDICATOR – SIGN / POINTER (PANUKAT)
  • Prototype – means exampleRubric is a guide listing specific criteria for grading or scoring academic papers, projects, or testsFormative assessments are on-going assessments, reviews, and observations in a classroom. Teachers use formative assessment to improve instructional methods and student feedback throughout the teaching and learning process. For example, if a teacher observes that some students do not grasp a concept, she or he can design a review activity or use a different instructional strategy. Likewise, students can monitor their progress with periodic quizzes and performance tasks. The results of formative assessments are used to modify and validate instruction.  Summative assessments are typically used to evaluate the effectiveness of instructional programs and services at the end of an academic year or at a pre-determined time. The goal of summative assessments is to make a judgment of student competency after an instructional phase is complete. For example, in Florida, the FCAT is administered once a year -- it is a summative assessment to determine each student's ability at pre-determined points in time. Summative evaluations are used to determine if students have mastered specific competencies and to identify instructional areas that need additional attention.
  • Ongoing assessment throughout the learning process is also critical as it directs the teacher and student as to where to go next. Several assessment techniques are described in this section.
  • Formative assessment need not be written all the time the teacher can check their students’ understanding in a variety of ways like: asking questions, group discussions, games and puzzles
  • Information from summative assessments can be used formatively when students or faculty use it to guide their efforts and activities in subsequent courses.BENCHMARK – SCALE / YARDSTICK, LEVEL OR POINT OF REFERENCE

K to12 ASSESSMENT AND RATING OF LEARNING OUTCOMES Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ASSESSMENT AND RATING OF LEARNING OUTCOMES UNDER THE K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM DIVINE MERCY COLLEGE FOUNDATION INC. Caloocan City Professional Education Presented by: CHRISTIAN D. EVANGELISTA MARIANNE T. EVANGELISTA, MSHRM
  • 2. DepEd ORDER No. 73 S. 2012 General Guidelines for the Assessment and Rating of Learning Outcomes • Effective School Year () 2012-2013, the standards-based assessment and rating system shall be implemented to support the progressive roll-out starting with grades 1 and 7 of the K to 12 Basic Education Curriculum in public and private elementary and secondary schools nationwide.
  • 3. OUTLINE OF PRESENTATION • Philosophy of Assessment • Nature of Assessment and Its Purpose • Levels of Assessment • Assessment Tools • Levels of Proficiency and Equivalent Numeric Value • Rating System • Assessment Rubric • Frequency of Assessment
  • 4. WHAT IS “K TO 12 PROGRAM”?
  • 5. K TO 12 PROGRAM • The K to 12 Program covers: • Kindergarten and 12 years of basic education (six years of primary education, four years of Junior High School, and two years of Senior High School [SHS])
  • 6. A. PHILOSOPHY • Assessment shall be used primarily as a quality assurance tool to track student progress in the attainment of standards, promote self-reflection and personal accountability for one’s learning, and provide a basis for the profiling of student performance
  • 7. B. NATURE AND PURPOSE OF ASSESSMENT • Assessment shall be holistic, with emphasis on the formative or developmental purpose of quality assuring student learning. • It also standards-based as it seeks to ensure that teachers will teach to the standards and students will aim to meet or even exceed the standards. • The students’ attainment of standards in terms of content and performance is, therefore, a critical evidence of learning.
  • 8. LEVEL OF PERFORMANCE AND UNDERSTANDING
  • 9. C. LEVELS OF ASSESSMENT • The attainment of learning outcomes as defined in the standards shall be the basis for the quality assurance of learning using formative assessments. • They shall also be the focus of the summative assessments and shall be the basis for grading at the end of instruction.
  • 10. LEVEL OF LEARNING OUTCOMES • Knowledge • Process or Skill • Understanding • Products and Performances – The levels of Assessment are defined as follows:
  • 11. KNOWLEDGE • The substantive content of the curriculum, the facts and information that the student acquires
  • 12. PROCESS • Skills or cognitive operations that the student performs on facts and information for the purpose of constructing meanings or understandings.
  • 13. UNDERSTANDING(S) • Enduring big ideas, principles and generalizations inherent to the discipline, which may be assessed using the facets of understanding which may be specific to the discipline
  • 14. PRODUCTS / PERFORMANCES • Real-life application of understanding as evidenced by the student’s performance of authentic tasks.
  • 15. LEVELS OF ASSESSMENT These levels shall be the outcomes reflected in the class record and shall be given corresponding percentage weights as follows: LEVEL OF ASSESSMENT PERCENTAGE WEIGHT Knowledge 15% Process or Skills 25% Understanding (s) 30% Products / Performances 30% TOTAL = 100%
  • 16. ASSESSMENT TOOLS KNOWLEDGE PROCESS / SKILLS UNDERSTANDINGS PRODUCTS & PERFORMANCES Traditional Tools: Transform a Textual Presentation into a Diagram Facets of Understandings Authentic products or performance tasks that a student is expected to do to Paper and Pencil Tests ~ Outline, Organize, Analyze, Interpret, Translate, Convert or Express Information ~ Self Knowledge Demonstrate his or her understanding. ~ Multiple Choice ~ Flow Chart ~ Empathy ~ Self Understanding ~ True or False ~ Construct Graphs ~ Perspective ~ Self Monitoring ~ Matching Type ~ Graphic Organizers ~ Explanation ~ Self Assessment ~ Constructed Response Tests ~ Draw Analogies ~ Interpretation ~ Permit choices of combinations of oral, written, visual and kinesthetic modes
  • 17. LEVELS OF PROFICIENCY AND ITS EQUIVALENT NUMERICAL VALUE
  • 18.  The performance of the students shall be described in the report card, based on the following levels of proficiency LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY Beginning (B) Developing (D) Approaching Proficiency (AP) Proficient (P) Advanced (A)
  • 19.  While, the level proficiency shall be based on a numerical value which arrived form summing up the results of the student’s performance on the various level of assessment. EQUIVALENT NUMERICAL VALUE 74% and Below 75 - 79% 80 - 84% 85 - 89% 90% and Above
  • 20. LEVELS OF PROFICIENCY
  • 21. LEVELS OF PROFICIENCY
  • 22. FEED BACK • Results of the assessment across levels should be fed back immediately to the students, so that they know what to improve further, and then they can plan strategically how they can address any learning deficiency
  • 23. PROTOTYPE RUBRICS FOR THE DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ASSESSMENT
  • 24. WHAT IS RUBRIC: • A rubric is a guideline for rating student performance. • It must define the range of possible performance levels. • Within this range, there are different levels of performance which are organized from the lowest level to the highest level of performance. • Usually, a scale of possible points is associated with the continuum in which the highest level receives the greatest number of points and the lowest level of performance receives the fewest points.
  • 25. BENEFITS OF RUBRIC –The rubric provides assessment with exactly the characteristics for each level of performance on which the students and the teacher should base their judgment. –The rubric provides the students with clear information about how well they performed and what they need to accomplish in the future to better their performance.
  • 26. RUBRICS CRITERIA & PERCENTAGE CRITERIA PERCENTAGE Knowledge 15% Skills 25% Understanding (s) 30% Transfer of Understanding 30% TOTAL: 100%
  • 27. LEARNING OUTCOME #O1 KNOWLEDGE
  • 28. PAPER AND PENCIL INSTRUMENTS • Paper-and-pencil instruments refer to a general group of assessment tools in which candidates read questions and respond in writing. • This includes tests, such as knowledge and ability tests, and inventories, such as personality and interest inventories.
  • 29. MOST COMMON RESPONSE FORMATS ARE: 1. MULTIPLE CHOICE 2. TRUE OR FALSE 3. MATCHING TYPE 4. IDENTIFICATION 5. CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE / ESSAY
  • 30. A. KNOWLEDGE (15%)
  • 31. LEARNING OUTCOME #O2 SKILLS
  • 32. TRANSFORM TEXTUAL PRESENTATION INTO A DIAGRAM • Outline, Organize, Analyze, Interpret, Translate, Convert or Express Information by using: 1. Flow Chart 2. Graphs 3. Analogies 4. Graphic Organizers
  • 33. PROTOTYPE PIE GRAPH Result of Midterm Exam PERCENTAGE LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY B D AP P A 30% 10% 5% 15% 40% LEGEND
  • 34. B. SKILLS (25%)
  • 35. CONTINUATION:
  • 36. CONTINUATION: #02
  • 37. CONTINUATION: #03
  • 38. PROTOTYPE ASSESSMENT MATRIX FOR “TLE” (Technology Livelihood Education)
  • 39. BASIS FOR PROMOTION AND RETENTION LEVEL OF PROFICIENCY EQUIVALENT NUMERICAL VALUE Beginning (B) 74% and Below Developing (D) 75 - 79% Approaching Proficiency (AP) 80 - 84% Proficient (P) 85 - 89% Advanced (A) 90% and Above
  • 40. PROMOTION AND RETENTION • Promotion and Retention of students shall be by subject • Students whose proficiency level is Beginning (B) at the end of the quarter or grading period shall be required to undergo remediation after class hours so that they can immediately catch up as they move to the next grading period • If by the end of school year, the students are still at the Beginning level, then they shall be required to take summer classes
  • 41. RATING SYSTEM
  • 42. LEARNING OUTCOME #O3 UNDERSTANDING
  • 43. UNDERSTANDING • Understanding as expressed using any three of the six facets of understanding • The facets are explained (adapted from the paper, “Understanding by Design Framework in the Philippines” by Mc Tighe and Grant Wiggins, p.5)
  • 44. FACETS OF UNDERSTANDING CONCEPT EXPLAIN INTERPRET APPLY PERSPECTIVE EMPATHY SELF KNOWLEDGE
  • 45. FACET # 01 “EXPLANATION” • Concepts, principles, and processes by putting them in their own words, teaching them to others, justifying their answers and showing their reasoning.
  • 46. • By making sense of data, text, and experience through images, analogies, stories and models; FACET # 02 “INTERPRETATION”
  • 47. • Effectively using and adapting what they know in new and complex texts FACET # 03 “APPLICATION”
  • 48. • Demonstrate perspective by seeing the big picture and recognizing different points of view. FACET # 04 “PERSPECTIVE”
  • 49. FACET # 05 “EMPATHY” • Display empathy by perceiving sensitively and putting one’s self in someone else’s shoes;
  • 50. • Have self knowledge by showing met cognitive awareness, using productive habits of mind and reflecting on the meaning of the learning and experience. FACET # 06 “SELF KNOWLEDGE”
  • 51. UNDERSTANDING MAYBE ASSESSED BASED ON THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA
  • 52. Continuation:
  • 53. LEARNING OUTCOME #O4 PRODUCT / PERFORMANCES
  • 54. TRANSFER OF UNDERSTANDING • Transfer of understanding to life situations maybe assessed as demonstrated through the following: 1. PRODUCTS – Outputs which are reflective of learner’s creative application of understanding; 2. PERFORMANCES – skillful exhibition or creative execution of a process, reflective of masterful application of learning or understanding.
  • 55. STUDENT IS EXPECTED TO DEMONSTRATE HIS/HER UNDERSTANDING BY MEANS OF: • Self Understanding • Self Monitoring • Self Assessment
  • 56. SELF UNDERSTANDING • Also known as Self knowledge • Is the ability to understand one's own actions
  • 57. SELF MONITORING • Used in behavioral management where a person will keep a record of behavior patterns. • A personality trait for the ability to change behavior in response to different situations.
  • 58. • It is the process of gathering information about yourself in order to make an informed career decision. • A self assessment should include a look at the following: values, interests, personality, and skills. SELF ASSESSMENT
  • 59. Continuation:
  • 60. PROTOTYPE FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TOOLS
  • 61. PRE ASSESSMENT TOOL • Pre-assessment allows the teacher and student to discover what is already known in a specific topic or subject. • It is critical to recognize prior knowledge so students can engage in questioning, formulating, thinking and theorizing in order to construct new knowledge appropriate to their level.
  • 62. PROTOTYPE PRE-ASSESSMENT TOOL
  • 63. FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT • The goal of formative assessment is to gather feedback that can be used by the instructor and the students to guide improvements in the ongoing teaching and learning context. These are low stakes assessments for students and instructors. Examples: 1. Asking students to submit one or two sentences identifying the main point of a lecture 2. Have students submit an outline for a paper. 3. Early course evaluations 4. Giving quizzes to check student understanding
  • 64. SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT • The goal of summative assessment is to measure the level of success or proficiency that has been obtained at the end of an instructional unit, by comparing it against some standard or benchmark. • The outcome of a summative assessment can be used formatively, however, when students or faculty take the results and use them to guide their efforts and activities in subsequent courses. • Examples of summative assessments include:  a midterm exam  a final project  a paper  a senior recital
  • 65. PROTOTYPE SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TOOL THROUGH AUTHENTIC PERFORMANCE TASK
  • 66. Presented to: DR. BELLA LAUREANO And the students under Professional Education of The Divine Mercy College Foundation Inc (Batch 2013)