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APPROPRIATE LEARNING ACTIVITIES "INTRODUCTORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES"
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APPROPRIATE LEARNING ACTIVITIES "INTRODUCTORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES"

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INTRODUCTORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES

INTRODUCTORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES

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  • Anecdote – story, sketch It is when you set the stage for the remainder of the course.  Consequently, you need to lay the groundwork, clarify course expectations, and ensure students feel comfortable, safe, and secure. But how do you do that in the online environment? The first step involves introductions – students getting to know you, you getting to know the students, and the students getting to know each other.  Because community building is an important starting place for many online course models, we will explore some the most common and effective introductory assignments or ‘virtual ice breakers’ that construct the building blocks of your learning community.ObjectivesBy the end of this session, you will be able to:Compose a professional introduction as means to build community.Explore a variety of virtual ice breakers.Participate in two introductory activities.Reflect on the effectiveness of a particular introductory activity.
  • Anecdote – story, sketch ObjectivesCompose a professional introduction as means to build community.Explore a variety of virtual ice breakers.Participate in two introductory activities.Reflect on the effectiveness of a particular introductory activity.
  • Example: in literature – students are made to write poems, short stories or an essay to express particular stand on a relevant issue.

Transcript

  • 1. PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING “APPROPRIATE LEARNING ACTIVITIES” MARIANNE T. EVANGELISTA, MSHRM
  • 2. APPROPRIATE LEARNING ACTIVITIES • Once you have established your broad course objectives and considered how you will evaluate progress, you need to think about the learning activities you will employ to enable students to achieve those objectives. • The learning activities you use in teaching should provide students with an opportunity to develop the skills they need to demonstrate their mastery of the material. • In addition to alignment with students’ knowledge and skills, your teaching and learning activities should also demonstrate alignment in terms of course content, course structure, and instructional approaches (lecture, discussion, demonstration, etc.)
  • 3. LEARNING ACTIVITY COMPONENTS • Context - Subject, level, learning outcomes, environment etc. • Learning and Teaching approaches - Theories and Models • Tasks - Types, Techniques, Tools, Resources, Interaction, Roles • Assessments - Types, Techniques
  • 4. TYPES OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1. INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES 2. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 5. TYPES OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES • INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES – This is usually done at the start of the school year or the start of every new lesson.
  • 6. INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES • Beginning training sessions with warm introductions starts you off on the right foot. • It invites people to actively participate. It encourages them to get to know one another. • It sets the stage for having everyone learn from one another. And, it helps build connections and community – it warms and livens up the room. • Large gatherings and too little time may make introductions difficult, but, even with limited time, you can have people introduce themselves to one or two others they are sitting next to.
  • 7. INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES • Activities can come in the form of: 1. Games 2. Action songs 3. Energizers 4. Anecdote or story telling 5. or posing a question to the learners
  • 8. INTRODUCTION CAN BE DONE IN A NUMBER OF WAYS: • In the large group, start with a volunteer and then move in a circle to everyone. • Pair people together. You can ask people to do introductions with the person they are sitting next to. If you want to ensure that people who do not know one another get a chance to meet and talk, have people call out numbers to half of the total class, and then start at one again. Then, have people pair with the person who called out the same number for the exercise. It can also be good to have partners introduce the person they spoke with during introductions.
  • 9. CONTINUATION: • Form people into small groups of 3-5 people to do the introductions. This may work well with a large group. Select the option that will work best with your time-frame and your sense of how shy people are and how challenging they will find speaking with one another.
  • 10. Types of learning activities Type Technique Interaction Roles Tools & Resources Assessment Assimilative Reading Viewing Listening Artefact Assignment Brainstorming Buzz words Defending Dissertation Drill & practice Essay Exercise Fishbowl Ice breaker MCQ Mindmaps Negotiating Pair dialogues Performance Portfolio Product Question & answer Resource-based Role play Rounds Short answer Snowball Debate Test Voting 1 – many Group based Class based 1-1 S to S 1-1 S to T Individual Indiv learner Group leader Coach Participant Mentor Supervisor Rapporteur Facilitator Deliverer Pair person Presenter Peer assessor Moderator Adaptive Simulation Modelling Virtual worlds Communicative Chat Chat Email Discussion boards Mailing lists Weblogs Productive Spreadsheets Databases Narrative Audio Image Text Video Web page Interactive Libraries Portals Search engines Not assessed Diagnostic Formative Summative Info Handling Gathering Ordering Classifying Selecting Analysing Manipulating Adaptive Modelling Simulation Communicative Discussing Presenting Debating Productive Creating Producing Writing Drawing Composing Synthesising Experiential Practicing Mimicking Experiencing
  • 11. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES • The most fundamental level, development activities involves change. • This change must be cumulative and systematic; random change is not considered to be developmental in nature. • Whereas the concept of growth refers to the addition of new components or skills through the appearance of new cells, development refers to the refinement, improvement, and expansion of existing skills through the refinement of cells already present (Schuster, 1992).
  • 12. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES • Data Gathering Activity • Organizing and Summarizing activities • Application Activities • Creative and Expressive Activities • Concluding Activities
  • 13. DATA GATHERING ACTIVITIES • Teachers can now use a great number of tools for learning and which students can engage in. In the hands-on approach to learning, students are given a free hand in the selection of tools for data gathering. • This type of involvement in data gathering provides more opportunities for meaningful learning as well as independent study.
  • 14. TOOLS FOR DATA GATHERING • The tools are what they usually make use of in actual life situations and can be made readily available for gathering information such as: 1. Computers 2. Telephone 3. Internet 4. Video cameras.
  • 15. ORGANIZING AND SUMMARIZING ACTIVITIES • Teacher draws plan or structures the lesson plan by assigning impromptu activities. • This will be helpful in measuring the extent of understanding of the experiences during the activities and it will measure as well if objectives have been met.
  • 16. ORGANIZING AND SUMMARIZING ACTIVITIES • This can be done by: 1. Vocabulary words or drawing an object or animal related to the lesson proper. 2. Riddles and puzzles can also be used for a start. 3. After the activities, students may be asked to summarize, analyze in written form. 4. The new concepts and insights gathered from the activities.
  • 17. APPLICATION ACTIVITIES • Activities that are done during the application of the concepts. • The intention here is to enable the students to master and improve their performance and identify the content areas that have to be improved.
  • 18. CREATIVE AND EXPRESSIVE ACTIVITIES • These activities provide the use of imagination and expression of one’s feelings, thoughts, and ideas about the insights acquired. • Activities of these nature are normally done after the lesson proper and are designed to find out the amount of new knowledge acquired and how well it can be related to actual situations.
  • 19. CONCLUDING ACTIVITIES • Usually are activities students engaged in as part of the application of the newly acquired knowledge. • They may come in the form of wrap up, after which students submit the summary in outline form. • Teacher may also summarized the important points to be remembered by the learners.
  • 20. ASPECTS THAT ARE IMPROVED BY MEANS OF DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 21. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 22. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 23. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 24. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 25. DEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES
  • 26. END OF PRESENTATION THANK YOU!!!!