Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Practical Project Management - full course
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Practical Project Management - full course

3,675

Published on

A full course I developed based on about ten years of experience in project management in IT projects in the Netherlands and non-profit media projects in Kenya.

A full course I developed based on about ten years of experience in project management in IT projects in the Netherlands and non-profit media projects in Kenya.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
1 Comment
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,675
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
316
Comments
1
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PRACTICAL PROJECTMANAGEMENT Marten Schoonman mjl.schoonman@gmail.com
  • 2. INDEX Introduction The Project Manager Project Cycle Management ‘3 PRINCIPLES’ Project Organization Resource Planning Project scope management Budget management Managing quality Project delivery & post-project Tips ‘n tricks
  • 3. INTRODUCTION – Background Marten Schoonman  University of Wageningen, the Netherlands  Junior Project Manager (Research Information Management, Organon)  Project Manager  Programme Manager  Account manager (Information Services Department, Organon)  Project Manager  Head Project Management (e-Marketing, Organon)  Project / Business Manager (Media Focus on Africa Foundation)
  • 4. Exercise E What is a project? E ‘Grand collection of projects’
  • 5. INTRODUCTION - Definitions Characteristics of a Project: • A project has a beginning and an end • A project has limited resources • A project follows a planned, organized method to meet its objectives with specific goals of quality and performance • Every project is unique • A project most often involves change Project is therefore not the same as a Programme or an Operation. Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better [S. Johnson
  • 6. INTRODUCTION - Definitions Project – Definition A project is a temporary effort made up of a set of related activities undertaken to achieve a unique goal or objective within specific constraints Management – Definition  A process of setting and achieving goals through: planning, organizing, directing and controlling;  Utilizing human, financial and material resources.
  • 7. INTRODUCTION - Definitions Project – Definition A project is a temporary effort made up of a set of related activities undertaken to achieve a unique goal or objective within specific constraints Management – Definition  A process of setting and achieving goals through: planning, organizing, directing and controlling;  Utilizing human, financial and material resources. The art of getting things done through other people
  • 8. INTRODUCTION - Definitions Project is a single, non-repetitive enterprise. It is usually undertaken to achieve PLANNED RESULTS within the TIME LIMIT and a COST BUDGET Budget Quality Schedule
  • 9. INTRODUCTION - Definitions Project is a single, non-repetitive enterprise. It is usually undertaken to achieve PLANNED RESULTS within the TIME LIMIT and a COST BUDGET Budget E WHICH IS THE MOST IMPORTANT CORNER IN THIS BALANCE? Quality Schedule
  • 10. INTRODUCTION – Project examples DREAM or PRIVATE WISH 1. Buying a plot of land 2. Building a house 3. Having a baby 4. Buying a family car WORK 1. Setting up an VCT centre 2. Rolling out new mobile network 3. Implementing a new financial system 4. Starting a new department
  • 11. INTRODUCTION – Project examples DREAM or PRIVATE WISH 1. Buying a plot of land 2. Building a house 3. Having a baby 4. Buying a family car WORK 1. Setting up an VCT centre 2. Rolling out new mobile network 3. Implementing a new financial system 4. Starting a new department
  • 12. INTRODUCTION – Project types R&D IT Technology change projects projects Construction Business projects projects Low high Requirements change
  • 13. Exercise E Match terms to their definitions
  • 14. Exercise1 Deliverable2 Duration3 Escalation4 GANTT chart5 Issue Lessons 6 learned 7 Milestone 8 Baseline 9 Phase10 Programme11 Project12 Resource13 Risk14 Scope15 Slack16 Sponsor17 Stakeholder18 Subproject19 Task20 WBS
  • 15. ExerciseJ A part of a projectK A person or group with an interest in the projectA A problem or challengeL A project activity that has a starting and finishing pointM A project within another project A temporary effort made up of a set of related activities undertaken to achieve a unique goal orI objective within specific constraintsB A vehicle for implementing an organization’s strategyT A view that graphically shows the project schedule over timeS Management lessons which may be used to improve the execution of future projectsC Raise an issue higher and higher in management until it is solvedN Spare or extra timeP The amount of time a task will take to finishO The initial project scheduleG The outcome of a process which is both definable and measurable also called milestoneH The outcome of a process which is both definable and measurable, also called deliverableE The people, material, equipment or facilities required to complete a taskQ The person chiefly responsible for leading the project to a successful outcomeR The possibility of something going wrong in the futureD The sum total of all of its products and their requirements or featuresF Work breakdown structure; hierarchical organization of project phases, tasks and end products
  • 16. Exercise1 Deliverable G The outcome of a process which is both definable and measurable also called milestone2 Duration P The amount of time a task will take to finish3 Escalation C Raise an issue higher and higher in management until it is solved4 GANTT chart T A view that graphically shows the project schedule over time5 Issue A A problem or challenge6 Lessons S Management lessons which may be used to improve the execution of future projects learned7 Milestone H The outcome of a process which is both definable and measurable, also called deliverable 8 Baseline O The initial project schedule 9 Phase J A part of a project10Programme B A vehicle for implementing an organization’s strategy11Project I A temporary effort made up of a set of related activities undertaken to achieve a unique goal or objective within specific constraints12Resource E The people, material, equipment or facilities required to complete a task13Risk R The possibility of something going wrong in the future14Scope D The sum total of all of its products and their requirements or features15Slack N Spare or extra time on non16Sponsor Q The person chiefly responsible for leading the project to a successful outcome17Stakeholder K A person or group with an interest in the project18Subproject M A project within another project19Task L A project activity that has a starting and finishing point20WBS F Work breakdown structure; hierarchical organization of project phases, tasks and end products
  • 17. PROJECT MANAGER
  • 18. PROJECT MANAGER – Skills and competences Under the leadership of the G&D Leader, the AWARD Project Manager will: …plan and manage the day-to-day delivery…supervise the staff and consultants engaged…provide leadership on the science capacity-building components…work closely with research networks…provide regular and accurate management reports…review the effectiveness and efficiency of systems, procedures, etc…take a lead role in internal monitoring and evaluation…possesses the ability to think critically and strategically about technical/administrative approaches and issues…judgment: demonstrates a sound understanding of when to share information and when to keep it confidential…the ability to undertake multiple tasks concurrently…creates a Project environment that is inclusive of all cultures and backgrounds… determines priorities soundly… result-oriented… communication… responsibility… reliable… accurate… eye for detail… leadership… teambuilding… conscious of the politics of organizations… resolves conflicts…
  • 19. PROJECT MANAGER – Skills and competences Under the leadership of the G&D Leader, the AWARD Project Manager will: …plan and manage the day-to-day delivery…supervise the staff and consultants engaged…provide leadership on the science capacity-building components… work closely with research networks…provide regular and accurate management reports…reviewthe effectiveness and efficiency of systems, procedures, etc…take a lead role in internal monitoring and evaluation…possesses the ability to think critically and strategically about technical/administrative approaches and issues…judgment: demonstrates a sound understanding of when to share information and when to keep it confidential…the ability to undertake multiple tasks concurrently…creates a Project environment that is inclusive of all cultures and backgrounds… determines priorities soundly… result-oriented… communication… responsibility… reliable… accurate… eye for detail… leadership… teambuilding… conscious of the politics of organizations… resolves conflicts…
  • 20. PROJECT MANAGER – Skills and competences Under the leadership of the G&D Leader, the AWARD Project Manager will: …plan and manage the day-to-day delivery…supervise the staff and consultants engaged…provide leadership on the science capacity-building components…work closely with research networks…provide regular and accurate management reports…review the effectiveness and efficiency of systems, procedures, etc…take a lead role in internal monitoring and evaluation…possesses the ability to think critically and strategically about technical/administrative approaches and issues…judgment: demonstrates a sound understanding of when to share information and when to keep it confidential…the ability to undertake multiple tasks concurrently…creates a Project environment that is inclusive of all cultures and backgrounds… determines priorities soundly… result-oriented… communication… responsibility… reliable… accurate… eye for detail… leadership… teambuilding… conscious of the politics of organizations… resolves conflicts…
  • 21. PROJECT MANAGER – Skills and competences Under the leadership of the G&D Leader, the AWARD Project Manager will: …plan and manage the day-to-day delivery…supervise the staff and consultants engaged…provide leadership on the science capacity-building Balance components…work closely with research networks…provide regular and accurate management reports…review the effectiveness and efficiency of systems, procedures, etc…take a lead role in internal monitoring and evaluation…possesses the ability to think critically and strategically about Technical skills <> Behavioral skills technical/administrative approaches and issues…judgment: demonstrates a sound understanding of when to share information and when to keep it confidential…the ability to undertake multiple tasks concurrently…creates a Project environment that is inclusive of all cultures and backgrounds… determines priorities soundly… result-oriented… communication… responsibility… reliable… accurate… eye for detail… leadership… teambuilding… conscious of the politics of organizations… resolves conflicts…
  • 22. PROJECT MANAGER – Roles and responsibilities „MINDMAP‟
  • 23. PROJECT MANAGER – Roles and responsibilities
  • 24. PROJECT CYCLE MANAGEMENT
  • 25. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE DREAM or WISH DREAM or WISH DREAM or WISH
  • 26. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE DREAM or WISH Design Plan Execute Finalise
  • 27. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE DREAM or WISH Design Identification & Specification Plan Execute The actual project Finalise Every project has an end
  • 28. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE DREAM or WISH Design Monitoring & Evaluation Plan Execute Finalise
  • 29. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE DREAM or WISH Design Monitoring & Evaluation Plan Execute Finalise Final evaluation to collect lessons learned
  • 30. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE
  • 31. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE
  • 32. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE
  • 33. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE INITIATE - This phase is where an idea or a proposal is authorized and funded as a project. It may include some initial planning and estimating to clarify its objective and scope. PLAN - This phase includes two distinct components; the development of plans that are required as part of the proposal – core planning, and the plans to manage the implementation of the project – facilitation planning. IMPLEMENT . Implementation includes taking all necessary actions to ensure the activities in the project plan are completed and the outputs of the plan are produced. Includes task assignments and authorizations to execute plans. MONITOR - Monitoring is about measuring the progress of a project against its objectives, looking at deviations from the plan and deciding on corrective steps to put the project back on track. It looks at the log-frame indicators and schedule and budget targets. ADAPT - This phase refers to the process by which the project manager adapts its project management methods from the insights and learning that was captured. It also refers to the changes that need to be incorporated in the original processes, approaches, strategies and methods planned to deliver the project interventions CLOSE - The closing phase of the project is when the project has achieved the planned objectives and all deliverables have been produced. The phase also includes the project evaluation to see if the original objectives were achieved or not
  • 34. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE INITIATE - This phase is where an idea or a proposal is authorized and funded as a project. It may include some initial planning and estimating to clarify its objective and scope. PLAN - This phase includes two distinct components; the development of plans that are required as part of the proposal – core planning, and the plans to manage the implementation Planning is important for: of the project – facilitation planning. • getting an overview of what needs to be done IMPLEMENT . Implementation don’t forget anything • making sure you includes taking all necessary actions to ensure the activities in the project• plan are completed and the outputs in the plan are produced. Includes task making sure you handle things of the right order • being able to know what the finish assignments and authorizations to execute plans. date is MONITORWhen Planning you measuring opportunity to:a project against its objectives, - Monitoring is about have the the progress of looking at • include lessons learned and beston corrective steps to put the project back on deviations from the plan and deciding practices track. It looks at the log-frame indicators and schedule and budget targets. • inform others what is going to happen • inform others to why, when and what you will manager adapts ADAPT - This phase refers by the process by which the project need them for its project • get reviews from insights and learning nothing is left out management methods from theothers to make surethat was captured. It also refers to the changes that need to be incorporated in the original processes, approaches, strategies and methods planned to deliver the project interventions CLOSE - The closing phase of the project is when the project has achieved the planned objectives and all deliverables have been produced. The phase also includes the project evaluation to see if the original objectives were achieved or not
  • 35. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE TIPS • Input from others; Experts, books, lessons learned, Brainstorms, Cross-check, reviews • Break big challenge down into small pieces • Begin with the end in mind (S. Covey) • Use risks as a guide – start with high impact / high likelihood risks first
  • 36. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE TIPS • Focus on the shortest path to result / critical path • Visualize, display and repeatedly communicate • Search for buy-in from the ‘stakeholders’ • Prioritization; use action lists
  • 37. 3 PRINCIPLES
  • 38. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – The three principles 1. PLANNING.. 2. COMMUNICATION.. 3. RISK MANAGEMENT..
  • 39. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – The three principles 1. PLANNING – the process of (1) defining what will happen in the project, how it is prepared, by whom and when, the cost and any dependencies. (2) monitoring and adjustment. 2. COMMUNICATION – the process of (1) informing all ‘stakeholders’, beneficiaries, workers, colleagues, sponsors / donors, media; (2) Getting and maintaining buy-in of decisions makers; (3) Listening. 3. RISK MANAGEMENT – the process of identification, evaluation and mitigation of any project risk.
  • 40. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – The three principles 1. PLANNING – the process of (1) defining what will happen in the project, how it is prepared, by whom and when, the cost and any dependencies. (2) monitoring and adjustment. 2. COMMUNICATION – the process of (1) informing all ‘stakeholders’, beneficiaries, workers, colleagues, sponsors / donors, media; (2) Getting and maintaining buy-in of decisions makers; (3) Listening. 3. RISK MANAGEMENT – the process of identification, evaluation and mitigation of any project risk.
  • 41. 1. PLANNINGPlanning is bringing the future into the present so that you can do something about it now” (Alan Lakein)
  • 42. PROJECT PLANNING Time wasting  Planning detail  High risk; plan more Low high Project complexity
  • 43. PROJECT PLANNING Time wasting  Planning detail  High risk; Project complexity; can be defined as one where there are: plan more • Many tasks • Many dependencies Low high • Many resources Project complexity
  • 44. PROJECT PLANNING – SMART objectives Letter Major Term Minor Terms S Specific Significant, Stretching, Simple M Measurable Meaningful, Motivational, Manageable A Attainable Appropriate, Achievable, Agreed, Assignable, Actionable, Action-oriented[, Ambitious R Relevant Realistic, Results/Results- focused/Results-oriented, Resourced, Rewarding T Time-bound Time framed, Timed, Time-based, Timeboxed, Timely, Timebound, Time- Specific, Timetabled, Trackable, Tangible Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMART_criteria
  • 45. PROJECT PLANNING – SMART objectives Letter Major Term Minor Terms S Specific Significant, Stretching, Simple M Measurable Meaningful, Motivational, Manageable A Attainable Appropriate, Achievable, Agreed, Example: To train 12 trainers for two days Action-oriented[, Assignable, Actionable, on microfinance by December 31st 2010.Ambitious R Relevant Realistic, Results/Results- focused/Results-oriented, Resourced, Rewarding T Time-bound Time framed, Timed, Time-based, Timeboxed, Timely, Timebound, Time- Specific, Timetabled, Trackable, Tangible Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMART_criteria
  • 46. Exercise E Write down two SMART objectives SMART 1. 2.
  • 47. PROJECT PLANNING Determine requirements Collect the requirements in a Terms of Reference: 1. Background 2. Objectives 3. Scope 4. Constraints 5. Assumptions 6. Reporting 7. Deliverables and Milestones 8. Cost Benefit 9. Finance
  • 48. PROJECT PLANNING Determine requirements Determine possible solutions Collect the requirements in a Collect findings in a Terms of Reference: Feasibility study: 1. Background 1. Objectives 2. Objectives 2. Scope 3. Scope 3. Success criteria 4. Constraints 4. Performance requirements 5. Assumptions 5. Impact on organization and 6. Reporting other systems 7. Deliverables and Milestones 6. Risks 8. Cost Benefit 7. Recommended solution 9. Finance 8. Alternative solutions 9. Cost benefit
  • 49. PROJECT PLANNING
  • 50. PROJECT PLANNING Key elements of Project Schedules: 1. To communicate across the project team, client and line management 2. Technical excellence will not compensate for non communicating schedules 3. Poor layout can destroy schedules 4. Simplicity is essential 5. They must be updated
  • 51. PROJECT PLANNING TASKS STRUCTURE Research Material development Education now TIME
  • 52. PROJECT PLANNING
  • 53. PROJECT PLANNING GANTT CHART (MICROSOFT PROJECTS) = a type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule, developed by Henry Gantt
  • 54. PROJECT PLANNINGGANTT CHART(MICROSOFT PROJECTS)
  • 55. Exercise E Develop a planning
  • 56. MIND MAPPING from Darwins notebooks around July 1837 showing his first sketch of an evolutionary tree (Wikipedia).
  • 57. MIND MAPPING The Tree of Life as seen by Ernst Haeckel in the The Evolution of Man (1879) (Wikipedia).
  • 58. MIND MAPPING Modern highly resolved Tree Of Life, based on completely sequenced genomes (Wikipedia).
  • 59. MIND MAPPING Number associations (http://blog.iqmatrix.com/)
  • 60. MIND MAPPING
  • 61. MIND MAPPING Google ‘wonderwheel’
  • 62. MIND MAPPING Neural network (www.tricitypsychology.com) / Neuron injected neuron injected with a fluorescent dye (www.rikenresearch.riken.jp)
  • 63. MIND MAPPING
  • 64. PROJECT PLANNING MINDMAPPING / MINDMANAGER (WWW.MINDJET.COM)
  • 65. PROJECT PLANNING PERT chart for a project with five milestones (10 through 50) and six activities (A through F). The project has two critical paths: activities B and C, or A, D, and F – giving a minimum project time of 7 months with fast tracking. Activity E is sub-critical, and has a float of 2 months. PERT = Program Evaluation and Review Technique
  • 66. PROJECT PLANNING Advanced schedule networking:  Network = an illustration of the interdependency of project tasks  Critical Path = the sequence of project network activities which add up to the longest overall duration.  Slack = spare or extra time on non-critical paths  Time estimates: 1. Optimistic 2. Pessimistic 3. Most likely  Expected time for a task = (Optimistic + Pessimistic + 4xMost likely) / 6  Expected time for a project = Sum of expected times along the project’s critical path
  • 67. PROJECT PLANNING Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) - Eliyahu M. Goldratt From numerous studies from1998 for traditional project management methods, only 44% of projects typically finish on time, projects usually complete at 222% of the duration originally planned, 189% of the original budgeted cost, 70% of projects fall short of their planned scope (technical content delivered), and 30% are cancelled before completion. Using CCPM : 95% on-time and on-budget completion when CCPM is applied correctly. CCPM aggregates the large amounts of safety time added to many subprojects in project buffers to protect due-date performance, and to avoid wasting this safety time through bad multitasking, student syndrome, Parkinsons Law and poorly synchronized integration. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_Chain_Project_Management
  • 68. PROJECT PLANNING Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) - Eliyahu M. Goldratt From numerous studies from1998 for traditional project management methods, only 44% Student syndrome refers to the phenomenon of projects typically finish on time, projects usually complete at 222% of the duration that many people will start to fully apply originally planned, 189% of the original budgeted cost, 70% of projects fall short of their themselves to a task just at the last possible planned scope (technical content delivered), and 30% are cancelled before completion. moment before a deadline. This leads to wasting any buffers built into individual task duration estimates Using CCPM : 95% on-time and on-budget completion when CCPM is applied correctly. Parkinsons Law: the demand upon a resource CCPM aggregates the large amounts of safety time added to many subprojects in project tends to expand to match the supply of the buffers to protect due-date performance, and to avoid wasting this safety time through bad resource multitasking, student syndrome, Parkinsons Law and poorly synchronized integration. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_Chain_Project_Management
  • 69. PROJECT PLANNING
  • 70. PROJECT PLANNING E Design an action plan ACTION ACTION TIMING BY WHOM (1 to 3 words, DESCRIPTION (start and end (one name of Actionable) (the action in date) person or more detail; organization) where, how many, how often)
  • 71. PROJECT PLANNING TIPS • Use an attractive and fun planning tool • Re-iterate the planning; review it days later and ask input • Phase your project • ‘Plan to adapt the plan’ • Communicate the plan
  • 72. PROJECT PLANNING TIPS • Use a ‘shadow plan’ (..) • Reserve time for unexpected events • Check prognosis at ¼ of a task and take action
  • 73. 2. COMMUNICATIONTo effectively communicate, we must realize that we are all different in the way we perceive the world and use this understanding as a guide to our communication with others. (Anthony Robbins)
  • 74. Exercise E Whisper this is your neighbors ear for me, please…
  • 75. COMMUNICATION
  • 76. COMMUNICATION Discussion & examples on verbal vs. E nonverbal communication
  • 77. COMMUNICATION Verbal communication: 7% Nonverbal communication: 93% (gesture touch body language posture facial expression eye contact clothing hairstyles paralanguage voice quality emotion speaking style rhythm intonation stress; 38% vocal tone and 55% body language and other). Nonverbal messages can interact with verbal messages in six ways: • repeating, • conflicting, • complementing, • substituting, • regulating • accenting/moderating “Even if someone decides to say nothing they are still communicating“ and “Silence speaks louder than words”
  • 78. COMMUNICATION Project sponsor Steering Media committee Project Manager Team Suppliers members Depart- Benefi- ments ciaries
  • 79. COMMUNICATION PROGRESS Project sponsor Steering Media committee DECISION-MAKING PR - ATTENTION Project Manager Team Suppliers members RESOURCES TROUBLESHOOTING Depart- Benefi- ments ciaries RESOURCES INPUT
  • 80. Exercise E Stakeholders overview…
  • 81. COMMUNICATION Project Project Manager sponsor  Learn about the sponsor and their operation  Build a sponsor relationship  Understand sponsor problems and issues  Explain your project methodology  Listen 80% Talk 20%  Avoid discussing detailed (technical) solutions  Agree on next steps
  • 82. COMMUNICATION • Newsletters (e-mail / bulletin board) • Progress reports; ‘report by exception’(e-mail) • Presentations / Discussion (face-to-face) • Discussion one-on-one And.. • ‘Management by walking around’
  • 83. COMMUNICATION Human factors that form the basis of control:  Ownership, commitment and accountability  Empowerment  Team participation  Measurement  Coaching
  • 84. COMMUNICATION
  • 85. COMMUNICATION Enthusiasm Chaotic Rigid Structured Core competence model, by D. Ofman
  • 86. COMMUNICATION Think ahead Rigid Enthusiasm Chaotic Flexibility Rigid Structured Core competence model, by D. Ofman
  • 87. COMMUNICATION International differences: • Direct vs. cautious • Mother language • Hierarchy Interpretation differences To do: • Pro-active attitude • Check assumptions; ‘over-communicate’ • Guidelines
  • 88. COMMUNICATION TIPS • Know the people involved – meet them personally • Know the people who (1) support and (2) oppose the project; keep a list • Ask input and listen
  • 89. COMMUNICATION TIPS • ‘Walk your talk’; be clear and honest in your communication • Focus on ‘effective communication’ (pink giraffe example) • Effective and quick conflict resolution • Keep the customer informed (& inform one when one does not expect to be informed)
  • 90. COMMUNICATION TIPS • When starting a new project; organize a formal ‘kick-off’ to mark the start of the project and clearly communicate the anticipated end result • Practice your negotiation skills
  • 91. 3. RISK MANAGEMENT What should you do when a rhino charges you? Pay him! & Risks is feature of projects
  • 92. RISK MANAGEMENT IDENTIFY EVALUATE MITIGATE
  • 93. RISK MANAGEMENT The collection of any risk that can impact on the project outputs; external, financial, human resource, organisational, responsibilities, IDENTIFY policies, corruption, etc Determine the severity of the EVALUATE risk in (1) impact (2) likelihood. MITIGATE Determine any action to be taken; (1) share (2) endure (3) avoid (4) lessen
  • 94. RISK MANAGEMENT RISKLIST
  • 95. Exercise E Risk list RISK IMPACT LIKELIHOOD MITIGATION
  • 96. Exercise E Issue list ISSUE PRIORITY MITIGATION
  • 97. RISK MANAGEMENT TIPS • Start the risk list during project planning and maintain it throughout the project • Listen to others (anyone) to collect risks • Ask advice to mitigate risks • Separate risks from issues
  • 98. PROJECTORGANISATION
  • 99. PROJECT ORGANIZATION ADRESSING:  Who is in which role; a person can be in more than one role, but what about conflicting interests.  Clarity of roles and responsibilities  Involving the experts  Get buy-in  Internal communication of the project (change)  Determined who reports to who and how problems are reported and managed  Agree on project tools and how to use them
  • 100. Exercise E Project team NAME ROLE(S) RESPONSIBILITY AVAILABILITY
  • 101. PROJECT ORGANISATION – Organisational diagram - Basic
  • 102. PROJECT ORGANISATION – Organizational diagram - Functional General Manager Manager Manager Dept. A Dept. B
  • 103. PROJECT ORGANISATION – Organizational diagram – Product or Project General Manager Manager Manager Product A Product B
  • 104. PROJECT ORGANISATION – Organizational diagram – Project Oriented Organizations General Manager Manager Manager Dept. A Dept. B Project Team
  • 105. PROJECT ORGANISATION – Problem solving; the escalation mechanism 2 Solve problems at the lowest possible level; if unsuccessful use the escalation mechanism
  • 106. PROJECT ORGANISATION – Responsibility chart  - Approve  - Must be notified  - May be consulted  - General management responsibility Project manager Team member x Task 1   Task 2   Task 3   Task 4   Also for: change control procedures, communications, personnel skills, etc
  • 107. RESOURCEPLANNING
  • 108. RESOURCE PLANNING Capacity planning: Mapping the project plan to availability of resources Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 (hours) (hours) (hours) John 40 40 40 Sarah 32 24 0 Peter 32 8 8
  • 109. RESOURCE PLANNING 100% (and sickness, leave, unforeseen) Expertise Y Weeks
  • 110. RESOURCE PLANNING Rational Unified Process
  • 111. Exercise E Human resource planning NAME WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3
  • 112. RESOURCE PLANNING TIPS • Plan & check availability and iterate (verify) with resource manager • Approach people personally to counter- check (nobody else will) • Inform all stakeholders of what is expected and by when and update them on changes
  • 113. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT
  • 114. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT Scope: The sum total of all of its products and their requirements or features ‘Scope creep’: START
  • 115. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT START
  • 116. PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT START
  • 117. Exercise E Project manager and Sponsor role-play; requirements and their priorities
  • 118. Exercise
  • 119. BUDGETMANAGEMENT
  • 120. BUDGET MANAGEMENT 1. After project planning; make financial outline 2. A budget form a baseline to measure against 3. Make sure you have financial commitment and have some idea of how much additional / contingency budget is available 4. Report regularly on the summary I Initial Budget II Project finances against budget III Financial reporting
  • 121. BUDGET MANAGEMENT – Initial Budget
  • 122. BUDGET MANAGEMENT – Initial Budget
  • 123. BUDGET MANAGEMENT – Project control
  • 124. BUDGET MANAGEMENT – Project control CONTROL }
  • 125. BUDGET MANAGEMENT E Develop a budget Item No. Unit Unit cost Total
  • 126. MANAGING QUALITY
  • 127. MANAGING QUALITY Budget Quality Schedule
  • 128. MANAGING QUALITY DREAM or WISH Design Monitoring & Evaluation Plan Execute Finalise Final evaluation to collect lessons learned
  • 129. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE – Monitoring and Evaluation
  • 130. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE – Monitoring and Evaluation Vision Mission Objectives Outcomes Output Activi -ties
  • 131. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE – Monitoring and Evaluation Vision  ‘Dream’ / Ideal world  What we can be held Mission accountable for  SMART goals Objectives  Answers ‘so what’, direct Outcomes result from outputs  Immediate results Output  Formulated SMART, basis for the plan Activi -ties
  • 132. PROJECT MANAGEMENT CYCLE – Monitoring and Evaluation Vision  ‘Dream’ / Ideal world  What we can be held Mission accountable for  SMART goals Objectives  Answers ‘so what’, direct Outcomes result from outputs  Immediate results Output  Formulated SMART, basis for the plan Activi -ties INPUTS
  • 133. BUDGET MANAGEMENT E Develop the logical framework Vision  ‘Dream’ / Ideal world Mission  What we can be held accountable for Objectives  SMART goals Outcomes  Answers ‘so what’, direct result from outputs Output  Immediate results  Formulated SMART, basis for Activ the plan ities
  • 134. PROJECT DELIVERY & POST-PROJECT
  • 135. PROJECT DELIVERY  ‘Plan the end date’ (it is a project and therefore ends)  Inform stakeholder in advance and sharing the success  Be careful with showing and sharing preliminary results documents  Make sure you can deliver what you promisedand what is expected  Evaluate, round-up and clean-up  Work on follow-up / last elements / manage overlaps with new projects
  • 136. TIPS ‘N TRICKS
  • 137. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Tips ‘n Tricks TIPS • Ensure a clear project description; what will the project deliver? • Never assume; even verify your own communication • Focus on teamwork;involve the team members, do it together
  • 138. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Tips ‘n Tricks TIPS • Start and maintain a to-do list; and prioritize the actions • Check planning estimates; e.g. ask a senior PM to countercheck • Keep a paper trail; decisions, approvals, meeting minutes
  • 139. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Tips ‘n Tricks TIPS • Work out what your escalation mechanism is and remember to use it • To quickly become a better PM use self- assessments, evaluations and 360º’s • Spend 80% of your time listening and 20% of you time talking
  • 140. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Tips ‘n Tricks TIPS • Manage your project management files neatly, preferably using a hierarchy • Use workshop efficiently to get input and buy-in; learn and try the various techniques • Use your gut feeling, when in doubt; use a project health check form
  • 141. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Tips ‘n Tricks WEBTIPS • Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/ Definitions, examples, hyperlinks • Project Management 4 Development http://www.pm4dev.com/ Free project management resources and distant learning • Project Management Institute www.pmi.org More information on project management and certification • Google..
  • 142. PROJECT MANAGEMENT – Tips ‘n Tricks BOOKTIPS • Guide to Project Management; Achieving lasting benefit through effective change, Paul Roberts, 2007, The Economist • Project Management For Dummies, Stanley E. Portney • Fundamentals of Project Management. A modern methodology to manage development projects for international assistance and humanitarian relief organizations. PM4DEV, October 2007 – more on internet

×