GETTING YOUR MESSAGE OUT The Basic Tools of Media Relations
The Media <ul><li>Media—plural (singular: medium), from Latin word meaning “middle” </li></ul><ul><li>News media are the b...
Where We Get Our News <ul><li>71% local TV news </li></ul><ul><li>54% local newspaper </li></ul><ul><li>47% Google, Yahoo ...
Basic Elements of Communication <ul><li>Source—who delivers your message? </li></ul><ul><li>Message—what do you want peopl...
<ul><ul><li>Is it unusual? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Find a unique angle </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How...
Using the News Media To Get Your Message Out <ul><li>In print </li></ul><ul><li>On TV </li></ul><ul><li>On radio </li></ul...
Getting Your Message Out in Print <ul><li>News releases/media advisories </li></ul><ul><li>Opinion-editorial pieces (op-ed...
--News Releases-- <ul><li>To introduce new product </li></ul><ul><li>To announce personnel changes </li></ul><ul><li>To pr...
General News Release Tips <ul><li>E-mail preferred delivery method; ask reporter/editor preference </li></ul><ul><li>Fax O...
News Release Format <ul><li>Release Time/Date </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ For Immediate Release” in caps </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
News Release Format  (cont) <ul><li>Headline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Primary news hook </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Subhead (Optio...
News Release Content <ul><li>Lead paragraph  (Grabber) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What </li></ul...
News Release Content  (cont) <ul><li>Body (2-3 paragraphs) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevant info on news content </li></ul><...
News Release Content  (cont) <ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Summary sentence or two </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B...
News Release Distribution  (cont) <ul><li>Consider timing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wednesday, Thursday best days </li></ul></...
News Release Follow-Up <ul><li>Call to verify receipt </li></ul><ul><li>Offer additional info or assistance </li></ul><ul>...
News Release Distribution <ul><li>Develop your own media contact list for local/regional coverage </li></ul><ul><li>For re...
Media Advisories <ul><li>To announce news conference, photo ops, press events </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail or 1-pg fax includi...
--Opinion-Editorial Pieces-- <ul><li>To advocate your position </li></ul><ul><li>To offer suggestions and solutions </li><...
Writing an Op-Ed Piece <ul><li>Shoot for 500-750 words </li></ul><ul><li>Be timely and relevant to news </li></ul><ul><li>...
Submitting an Op-Ed Piece <ul><li>E-mail AND fax to editor (by name) </li></ul><ul><li>Call editor to verify receipt and r...
--Letters to the Editor-- <ul><li>To respond to news coverage </li></ul><ul><li>To respond to editorial </li></ul><ul><li>...
Writing Letters to the Editor <ul><li>Respond within 48 hours  </li></ul><ul><li>Observe length limits, other rules </li><...
Submitting Letters to Editor <ul><li>Use newspaper websites where submission mechanisms provided </li></ul><ul><li>If no w...
--Editorial Briefings-- <ul><li>To introduce yourself as local resource and expert on important issue </li></ul><ul><li>To...
Setting Up an Editorial Briefing <ul><li>E-mail or call editor’s office to request 20 minutes for briefing </li></ul><ul><...
Doing an Editorial Briefing <ul><li>Remember 3Rs of editorial briefings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Realistic expectations </li>...
Doing an Editorial Briefing  (cont) <ul><li>Provide 1-2 page handouts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your name, position, contact i...
-- Reporter Meetings-- <ul><li>Contact reporter covering issue </li></ul><ul><li>Request short meeting to introduce yourse...
Getting Your Message Out on TV <ul><li>News conferences </li></ul><ul><li>Media events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting media...
News Conferences <ul><li>Only for BIG news—don’t abuse! </li></ul><ul><li>Location convenient to media, especially TV </li...
Holding a News Conference <ul><li>Notify media 3-4 days in advance if possible (media advisory) </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule...
Holding a News Conference  (cont) <ul><li>Ensure enough power for everything </li></ul><ul><li>Use podium to hold radio mi...
Media Events <ul><li>Getting coverage of your own events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make location convenient for media  </li></...
Media Events  (cont) <ul><li>Responding to others’ events (protests, “attack” events) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Put distance b...
Studio Appearances <ul><li>Usually taped but occasionally live </li></ul><ul><li>Usually include all sides of issue </li><...
Studio Appearances  (cont) <ul><li>Dress conservatively—solid colors except black, avoid bright stripes or plaids—blue or ...
Studio Appearances  (cont ) <ul><li>Sit up straight, slightly forward </li></ul><ul><li>Look directly at interviewer or sp...
Getting Your Message Out  on Radio <ul><li>To educate public about issue </li></ul><ul><li>To promote upcoming event </li>...
Getting Your Message Out  on Radio   (cont) <ul><li>Radio interviews may be conducted: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>By telephone ...
Doing Radio Interviews <ul><li>With no visuals, it’s about SOUND </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocal quality </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Doing Radio Interviews  (cont) <ul><li>News interviews—earlier rules apply for getting coverage (i.e., timing, newsworthin...
Doing Radio Interviews  (cont) <ul><li>Reporters ask news interview Q’s </li></ul><ul><li>Listeners ask talk show Q’s </li...
Getting Your Message  Out On the Internet <ul><li>Web sites, on-line press room </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>...
Summary <ul><li>Good PR doesn’t have to be complicated. </li></ul><ul><li>Do the right thing. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell peopl...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

GETTING YOUR MESSAGE OUT

1,036 views

Published on

A PPT developed for presentation to PR volunteers for client non-profit attending national conference.

Published in: Sports, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,036
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

GETTING YOUR MESSAGE OUT

  1. 1. GETTING YOUR MESSAGE OUT The Basic Tools of Media Relations
  2. 2. The Media <ul><li>Media—plural (singular: medium), from Latin word meaning “middle” </li></ul><ul><li>News media are the bridge between you and your audience. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Where We Get Our News <ul><li>71% local TV news </li></ul><ul><li>54% local newspaper </li></ul><ul><li>47% Google, Yahoo or TV news sites </li></ul><ul><li>46% network evening news </li></ul><ul><li>43% Fox News </li></ul><ul><li>39% CNN </li></ul><ul><li>34% network morning shows </li></ul><ul><li>28% NPR </li></ul>
  4. 4. Basic Elements of Communication <ul><li>Source—who delivers your message? </li></ul><ul><li>Message—what do you want people to know about you? </li></ul><ul><li>Receiver—who are you talking to? </li></ul><ul><li>Channel—what vehicles will you use to get your message out? </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><ul><li>Is it unusual? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Find a unique angle </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How many people does it affect? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More people = bigger news </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How does it affect them? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why should they care? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Using the News Media To Get Your Message Out <ul><li>In print </li></ul><ul><li>On TV </li></ul><ul><li>On radio </li></ul><ul><li>On the Internet </li></ul>
  7. 7. Getting Your Message Out in Print <ul><li>News releases/media advisories </li></ul><ul><li>Opinion-editorial pieces (op-ed) </li></ul><ul><li>Letters to the editor </li></ul><ul><li>Editorial briefings </li></ul><ul><li>Reporter meetings </li></ul>
  8. 8. --News Releases-- <ul><li>To introduce new product </li></ul><ul><li>To announce personnel changes </li></ul><ul><li>To promote recognition or award </li></ul><ul><li>To respond to current events </li></ul><ul><li>To announce upcoming event </li></ul><ul><li>To report on actions taken </li></ul>
  9. 9. General News Release Tips <ul><li>E-mail preferred delivery method; ask reporter/editor preference </li></ul><ul><li>Fax OK as alternate or back-up </li></ul><ul><li>No attachments—embedded in body of e-mail </li></ul><ul><li>400-500 words best length </li></ul><ul><li>Consistent, recognizable format </li></ul>
  10. 10. News Release Format <ul><li>Release Time/Date </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ For Immediate Release” in caps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Embargo Until (Date)” in caps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contact Info </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contact name, title, company </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phone, e-mail, website </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. News Release Format (cont) <ul><li>Headline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Primary news hook </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Subhead (Optional) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Secondary news hook </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dateline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>City, state, date </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. News Release Content <ul><li>Lead paragraph (Grabber) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. News Release Content (cont) <ul><li>Body (2-3 paragraphs) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevant info on news content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quotes from staff, industry experts, satisfied customers (testimonials) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid lingo, jargon, technical terms </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. News Release Content (cont) <ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Summary sentence or two </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boilerplate company/organization description (always same) </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. News Release Distribution (cont) <ul><li>Consider timing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wednesday, Thursday best days </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Piggyback on popular current topic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid competing with major news </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Release early in day (unless embargoed) to maximize coverage </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. News Release Follow-Up <ul><li>Call to verify receipt </li></ul><ul><li>Offer additional info or assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor for placement </li></ul><ul><li>Remember: your release or part of it may appear as part of a larger story on topic; that’s OK too! </li></ul>
  17. 17. News Release Distribution <ul><li>Develop your own media contact list for local/regional coverage </li></ul><ul><li>For regional/national coverage, consider on-line services (e.g., PRWeb) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PR Newswire </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocus, Cision (subscription) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other on-line distribution services </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Media Advisories <ul><li>To announce news conference, photo ops, press events </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail or 1-pg fax including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who is holding the event </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What the event will be </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When the event is scheduled </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where the event will be held </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why the event is being held </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contacts for more information </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. --Opinion-Editorial Pieces-- <ul><li>To advocate your position </li></ul><ul><li>To offer suggestions and solutions </li></ul><ul><li>To influence or inform </li></ul><ul><li>To call to action </li></ul><ul><li>To showcase your expertise </li></ul><ul><li>To position yourself as resource </li></ul>
  20. 20. Writing an Op-Ed Piece <ul><li>Shoot for 500-750 words </li></ul><ul><li>Be timely and relevant to news </li></ul><ul><li>Use short sentences and paragraphs </li></ul><ul><li>Graph 1: Introduce issue and key point </li></ul><ul><li>Graph 2: Explain/expand on key point </li></ul><ul><li>Graphs 3-4: Supporting info, stats, quotes, expert opinion </li></ul><ul><li>Final graph: Wrap-up and punch line </li></ul>
  21. 21. Submitting an Op-Ed Piece <ul><li>E-mail AND fax to editor (by name) </li></ul><ul><li>Call editor to verify receipt and request consideration of piece </li></ul><ul><li>Address “exclusivity” issue—honestly </li></ul><ul><li>Follow up in one week re status </li></ul><ul><li>If no placement, revise piece and try elsewhere </li></ul>
  22. 22. --Letters to the Editor-- <ul><li>To respond to news coverage </li></ul><ul><li>To respond to editorial </li></ul><ul><li>To respond to another letter </li></ul><ul><li>To advocate position </li></ul><ul><li>To call to action </li></ul>
  23. 23. Writing Letters to the Editor <ul><li>Respond within 48 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Observe length limits, other rules </li></ul><ul><li>Source all quotes and statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on YOUR message </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid personal attacks </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain reasonable tone </li></ul><ul><li>Write clearly and concisely </li></ul>
  24. 24. Submitting Letters to Editor <ul><li>Use newspaper websites where submission mechanisms provided </li></ul><ul><li>If no website mechanism, e-mail directly to editor (call for address) </li></ul><ul><li>Keep dated copy on file </li></ul>
  25. 25. --Editorial Briefings-- <ul><li>To introduce yourself as local resource and expert on important issue </li></ul><ul><li>To offer your perspective on timely issues </li></ul><ul><li>To address concerns about coverage of your issues </li></ul>
  26. 26. Setting Up an Editorial Briefing <ul><li>E-mail or call editor’s office to request 20 minutes for briefing </li></ul><ul><li>Be specific about purpose of meeting </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how the briefing will benefit newspaper’s coverage of your issue </li></ul><ul><li>Deadlines will drive scheduling </li></ul>
  27. 27. Doing an Editorial Briefing <ul><li>Remember 3Rs of editorial briefings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Realistic expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasonable tone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Responsive attitude </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use positive approach: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ How can we do better?” </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. Doing an Editorial Briefing (cont) <ul><li>Provide 1-2 page handouts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your name, position, contact info </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organization description </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Position statements on key issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experts who share your perspective, including contact info for them </li></ul></ul>
  29. 29. -- Reporter Meetings-- <ul><li>Contact reporter covering issue </li></ul><ul><li>Request short meeting to introduce yourself and organization </li></ul><ul><li>Provide 1-2 page handout for future reference </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify goal—balance, accuracy </li></ul>
  30. 30. Getting Your Message Out on TV <ul><li>News conferences </li></ul><ul><li>Media events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Getting media to your events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Responding to others’ events </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Studio appearances </li></ul>
  31. 31. News Conferences <ul><li>Only for BIG news—don’t abuse! </li></ul><ul><li>Location convenient to media, especially TV </li></ul><ul><li>Typical “visuals” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Talking heads </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exhibits or graphics (poster-size) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Backdrops (selected sites) </li></ul></ul>
  32. 32. Holding a News Conference <ul><li>Notify media 3-4 days in advance if possible (media advisory) </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule before noon to maximize coverage, accommodate deadlines </li></ul><ul><li>Reserve room large enough to handle podium, speakers, exhibits, TV cameras, reporters, and audience </li></ul>
  33. 33. Holding a News Conference (cont) <ul><li>Ensure enough power for everything </li></ul><ul><li>Use podium to hold radio mics </li></ul><ul><li>Distribute news release summarizing event and quotes </li></ul><ul><li>Have graphics available on disk or travel drive </li></ul>
  34. 34. Media Events <ul><li>Getting coverage of your own events </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make location convenient for media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure media know where to go </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have program and material well-organized; don’t waste reporter time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Same notice and timing as news conference </li></ul></ul>
  35. 35. Media Events (cont) <ul><li>Responding to others’ events (protests, “attack” events) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Put distance between yourself and negative visuals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintain reasonable tone, avoid defensiveness or anger </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide factual info in written form (news release or statement) </li></ul></ul>
  36. 36. Studio Appearances <ul><li>Usually taped but occasionally live </li></ul><ul><li>Usually include all sides of issue </li></ul><ul><li>Usually focus on current topic </li></ul><ul><li>Usually moderated by someone not involved in issue </li></ul>
  37. 37. Studio Appearances (cont) <ul><li>Dress conservatively—solid colors except black, avoid bright stripes or plaids—blue or red are good </li></ul><ul><li>Blue or white shirt </li></ul><ul><li>Modest make-up—they’ll perk you up if needed </li></ul><ul><li>Dress to be comfortable—nothing to distract from your message </li></ul>
  38. 38. Studio Appearances (cont ) <ul><li>Sit up straight, slightly forward </li></ul><ul><li>Look directly at interviewer or speaker, not at camera </li></ul><ul><li>Gesture naturally but avoid hands in front of face (torso box) </li></ul><ul><li>Smile when appropriate but don’t force it </li></ul>
  39. 39. Getting Your Message Out on Radio <ul><li>To educate public about issue </li></ul><ul><li>To promote upcoming event </li></ul><ul><li>To call to action </li></ul><ul><li>To respond to current events </li></ul><ul><li>To build awareness and identity </li></ul>
  40. 40. Getting Your Message Out on Radio (cont) <ul><li>Radio interviews may be conducted: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>By telephone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In studio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On location </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Radio interview opportunities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>News </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk shows </li></ul></ul>
  41. 41. Doing Radio Interviews <ul><li>With no visuals, it’s about SOUND </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocal quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Voice patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speech patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speech rate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expressiveness </li></ul></ul>
  42. 42. Doing Radio Interviews (cont) <ul><li>News interviews—earlier rules apply for getting coverage (i.e., timing, newsworthiness, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Talk shows—rules are different </li></ul><ul><ul><li>May be news but not necessarily </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk shows also educate, entertain, provoke discussion </li></ul></ul>
  43. 43. Doing Radio Interviews (cont) <ul><li>Reporters ask news interview Q’s </li></ul><ul><li>Listeners ask talk show Q’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With listeners, “no holds barred” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Note names, speak one-on-one </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be prepared for ANYTHING </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintain focus on your messages </li></ul></ul>
  44. 44. Getting Your Message Out On the Internet <ul><li>Web sites, on-line press room </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>List-Servs </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, MySpace, Digg, Linkedin, etc.) </li></ul>
  45. 45. Summary <ul><li>Good PR doesn’t have to be complicated. </li></ul><ul><li>Do the right thing. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell people about it. </li></ul><ul><li>Tell them why it matters. </li></ul>

×