Education and the process of stratification

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Process of Stratification in Enducation

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Education and the process of stratification

  1. 1. Marlon L. Berzaldo II-1 BSE History
  2. 2. Lies the key to our future Most people believe that schooling is directly linked to occupational and financial success. Schools should produced individuals who can function in society.
  3. 3. ―Equality of educational oppurtunity‖
  4. 4. • Public or private schools • Ability grouping • Home and community environments • Teacher and student expectations
  5. 5. STRATIFICATION – It refers to our position in the society. - Upper class - Middle class - Lower class
  6. 6. According to Max Weber Class – described as a multidimensional concept which is determined by three major variable: wealth, power, and prestige.
  7. 7. Wealth – refers to one’s property, capital, and income. Power – implies the ability to make major decisions or to influence others to act in one’s benefit. Occupation is a main factor in one’s prestige. Esucation affects occupational status, and income is closely associated with it.
  8. 8. Two opposing theories of stratification are most often used to explain the unequal class system in our society: Functionalist (consensus) theory Conflict Theory
  9. 9. Functionalist Theory According to this perspective, each part of society is related to each other part in the total society. In order to maintain a working balance between the parts, the system has certain requirements and agreed-upon rules.
  10. 10. People are induced to do what society needs done, motivated to fulfill roles by extrinsic rewards (money, prestige) The importance of a particular role and scarcity of qualified persons to fill the role determine the prestige ranking of position. For instance, doctors are seen as more important than bartenders, and have more prestige and higher pay.
  11. 11. Those positions which are most complex and important require the most talent and training—that is, education---are the most highly rewarded.
  12. 12. Conflict Theory They believe that problems in the educational system stem from the conflicts in the society as a whole. Education is but one part of a system which is based on ―have‖ and ―have-not‖.
  13. 13.  Reproductionists, revisionists, and neo- Marxists – stemming from the idea that the upper-middle class ―conspires‖ to perpetuate their own class interests by limiting access to educational opportunities for other groups.  ―Cultural Capital‖ - Parents provide their children with cultural capital by transmitting the attitudes and knowledge needed to succeed in the current educational system.
  14. 14. Social class Race Sex
  15. 15. Equal opportunity exists when all people, even those without status, wealth, or membership in a privileged group,have an equal chance of achieving a high socioeconomic status in society regardless of their sex, minority status, or social class.
  16. 16. Equal opportunity (James Coleman) Providing free education Provide common curriculum Provide that children from diverse backgrounds attend the same school
  17. 17. Concept of equality of educational opportunity means providing equal facilities, finances for schools and availability of schooling.
  18. 18. Public vs Private Schools Tracking and Ability grouping Teacher expectations (self-fulfilling prophecy) Home Environment Effects on Educational Achievement and Stratification
  19. 19. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING

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