Primer on Play: Case Study for Knowledge Guru
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Primer on Play: Case Study for Knowledge Guru

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As shared in #GE4L, great structure of how and why to create game based learning. Prime case study to use when discussing possibilities of gamification for business

As shared in #GE4L, great structure of how and why to create game based learning. Prime case study to use when discussing possibilities of gamification for business

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  • Display until start of session.
  • Introduce self.Indicate that Steve Boller, marketing strategist for BLP is moderating chat.
  • Show people how controls work. Point out handraising and chat features. Point out that the upside of GoToWebinar is ability for 100 people to be part of it and, generally, audio remains good even VOiP. Downside? It doesn’t support peer-to-peer chat so people cannot see each other’s comments. However, BLP will be able to see every question/comment – and we’ll share out as appropriate.
  • Let people share via chat their definition of a game.Show definition – but be quick
  • Go to POLL #1 and let them answer.
  • Introduce Poll #2
  • I’m here because I love games – and creating games for learning Here’s a few games we’ve done – than span gamut from board game to digital.A Paycheck Away was a game we did for Spirit and Place Festival to help people experience/learn about homelessness…in the span of a 90-minute game-play experience.
  • The Grower Game is part of a course to educate agricultural sales reps and marketing folks about the rice crop. Learners actually get to go through a growing season and try to get an average yield of rice. Through the game they learn about managing nutrients, crop health, getting a crop started, etc.
  • The Grower Game is part of a course to educate agricultural sales reps and marketing folks about the rice crop. Learners actually get to go through a growing season and try to get an average yield of rice. Through the game they learn about managing nutrients, crop health, getting a crop started, etc.
  • This is a hot-off-the pressgamified course – not specifically a game, but uses tons of game elements. in Destroy the BBP, learners complete a series of challenges to save people from contaimination by blood-borne pathogens. It’s a safety course. As you know federal laws require people to take safety courses such as this every year…and people often tune them out and wish to be doing almost anythign else. We gamified this one tomake it more interesting and engaging…and hopefully to help people absorb its critical lessons.
  • So here’s what we’re going to cover today – I’m going spend about 10 mnutes talking about why games work. I’m then going to show you ONE example of game-based learning we designed using our Knoweldge Guru game engine. We’ll talk about the learning need, the game we created in response, and the results the client got from implementing the game. Then we’ll explore some basic steps for getting started designing game-based learning.Finally, I’ll wrap up with a little quiz for you and an opportunity for you to pose questions to me.Let’s go.
  • In my mind, the conversation on “why games” really starts with something called called The Forgetting Curve.Show POLL on forgetting.Choose the % of info that you think gets lost after someone finishes a pretty typical training course – either a “click next to continue” eLearning course where there is lots of reading or listening to narration or a webinar such as this one or a live event with an instructor who is doing a lot of “tell” with PPT slides.The current supposition is 90%. This % is derived from the work of a psychologist named Ebbinghaus. He came up with what’s known as the forgetting curve. This is a GREAT place to start a discussion of why games work – and why Knowledge Guru works.The hypthosis surrounding the forgetting curve is very old. Hermann Ebbinghau, a German psychologist formulated it. Ebbingaus was a pioneer in the study of memory. He is the guy who discovered the forgetting curve and the power of the spacing effect. ” Our ability to remember over the long-term is going to depend on lots of things – with the biggest thing being the # of repetitions we encounter over time. Each repetition allows us to “space out” the next one a bit farther and retain the information. Other factors can also influence memory – most importantly emotion – but repetition and spacing are huge. NOTE – use highlighter to show “spacing effect” on this graph.He was also the first to describe what we call the “learning curve.Games can have a serious positve impact on the forgetting curve.
  • Let’s talk about why games can help minimize the forgetting curve and make the learning curve easier.
  • Winning?Triumphing….over adversity, an arch nemesis, a major challengeCollaborating – to overcome an enemy, to master a challenge, to solve the puzzle, etc.Exploring and buildingCollectingProblem-solving or strategizingRole playing or imagining (game aesthetics are HUGE element of the fun!!)Surprise – surprising others and being surprised ourselves.
  • First things we have to have is motiviation; without desire, we cannot learn…Games provide motivation in the form of game goals, challenges, reward structures, conflicts to overcome, etc.Relevant practice is necessary – practice ensures repetition. We cannot learn or remember for the long-haul without it. It will get lost. The loops in games - and the challenges within games – can create the relevant practice.Feedback – contributes to memory. It helps embed the CORRECT information into our memory instead of incorret information. Games offer continuous feedback – your progress or lack of progress in the game is a source of feedback in itself. Other players’ reactions, the system’s reaction – all are feedback (Think about Monopoy or cards – the process of playing and the outcomes you get by certain actions all provide feedback to you, which causes you to adjust.If we cannot retrieve the info later- it’s as though we never learned it.The forgetting curve can make retrieval almost impossible – depending on the design of the learning and the repetition provided. Ebbinghaus’s work shows we need lots of repetition to remember. We also need to space those repetitions over time.
  • Of all the elements I shared, the feedback element is the one I think is largely ignored. Feedback loops are extremely powerful – and games have them in spades.
  • Quick summary – if you had to articulate value of games and why they wrok – here’s the chart. Let Steve know if you’d like to have it. A version of it is in one of our blog posts.
  • Now let’s look at one specific game example and how it helps people learn. I’ll be pointing out linkages between the learning needs and the game elements as I go.
  • Headquartered in Indianapolis, IN.Started about 12 years ago, went public in 2012.Enables marketers through software to integrate data to create a unified view of each consumer and engage in real-time, cross-channel marketing. We have:1,500 employees worldwide250,000 users worldwide500 + partners worldwideCustomers include Best Buy, Groupon, NASA, Nike, Papa Johns, and Microsoft.
  • Question – how many of you have situations where you need people to learn facts? Go ahead and use the chat to type in some things you need for people to learn.
  • Question – how many of you have situations where you need people to learn facts? Go ahead and use the chat to type in some things you need for people to learn.
  • Question – how many of you have situations where you need people to learn facts? Go ahead and use the chat to type in some things you need for people to learn.
  • Question – how many of you have situations where you need people to learn facts? Go ahead and use the chat to type in some things you need for people to learn.
  • Steve is going to take over for me now. He’s going to enter an actual game and show you how one works.
  • Steve is going to take over for me now. He’s going to enter an actual game and show you how one works.
  • Tracking matters inside organizations. Guru lets you track within its own admin robust admin tool but it is also Tin Can compliant if you want to track through your LMS – and your LMS is Tin Can compliant.
  • Tracking matters inside organizations. Guru lets you track within its own admin robust admin tool but it is also Tin Can compliant if you want to track through your LMS – and your LMS is Tin Can compliant.
  • Tracking matters inside organizations. Guru lets you track within its own admin robust admin tool but it is also Tin Can compliant if you want to track through your LMS – and your LMS is Tin Can compliant.
  • Tracking matters inside organizations. Guru lets you track within its own admin robust admin tool but it is also Tin Can compliant if you want to track through your LMS – and your LMS is Tin Can compliant.
  • Tracking matters inside organizations. Guru lets you track within its own admin robust admin tool but it is also Tin Can compliant if you want to track through your LMS – and your LMS is Tin Can compliant.
  • Games are great – people like them…but do they get business results? That’s the third segment of this morning’s presentation – a case study.
  • Play games and evaluate what you are playing. Deliberately explore different types of “fun” – or game dynamics: collecting, exploring, problem-solving, strategizing, role playing, etc.Know this up front: If you don’t like playing games….you will have a very tough time getting good at designing them. If you do like playing games it doesn’t mean you’ll be good at designing them – but you are far more likely to get good at it.Get familiar with game terminology and elements; start to recognize them in games you play and how they enhance or detract from game play – and how you can leverage them in learning. Examples::Narrative/storyAestheticsResource limitingRewards and recognition (feedback, earning things, etc.)Conflict and challenges/missions/questsKeep the “A” from ADDIE – and analyze your learning needs FIRST and then brainstorm possible game concepts that can support the learning.Dump the DDIE for agile and get started designing and building.Keep thinking like a game designer – come up with new ideas all the time.
  • Play games and evaluate what you are playing. Deliberately explore different types of “fun” – or game dynamics: collecting, exploring, problem-solving, strategizing, role playing, etc.Know this up front: If you don’t like playing games….you will have a very tough time getting good at designing them. If you do like playing games it doesn’t mean you’ll be good at designing them – but you are far more likely to get good at it.Get familiar with game terminology and elements; start to recognize them in games you play and how they enhance or detract from game play – and how you can leverage them in learning. Examples::Narrative/storyAestheticsResource limitingRewards and recognition (feedback, earning things, etc.)Conflict and challenges/missions/questsKeep the “A” from ADDIE – and analyze your learning needs FIRST and then brainstorm possible game concepts that can support the learning.Dump the DDIE for agile and get started designing and building.Keep thinking like a game designer – come up with new ideas all the time.
  • Play games and evaluate what you are playing. Deliberately explore different types of “fun” – or game dynamics: collecting, exploring, problem-solving, strategizing, role playing, etc.Know this up front: If you don’t like playing games….you will have a very tough time getting good at designing them. If you do like playing games it doesn’t mean you’ll be good at designing them – but you are far more likely to get good at it.Get familiar with game terminology and elements; start to recognize them in games you play and how they enhance or detract from game play – and how you can leverage them in learning. Examples::Narrative/storyAestheticsResource limitingRewards and recognition (feedback, earning things, etc.)Conflict and challenges/missions/questsKeep the “A” from ADDIE – and analyze your learning needs FIRST and then brainstorm possible game concepts that can support the learning.Dump the DDIE for agile and get started designing and building.Keep thinking like a game designer – come up with new ideas all the time.
  • They can add or edit learning objectives – and associate the objectivs with a topic.
  • They can add or edit learning objectives – and associate the objectivs with a topic.
  • They can add or edit learning objectives – and associate the objectivs with a topic.
  • Paper prototype QUICKLYTest that prototype.RefineTest again
  • Paper prototype QUICKLYTest that prototype.RefineTest again
  • Paper prototype QUICKLYTest that prototype.RefineTest again
  • So…the next several screens are some examples of digital protoytpes and mockups. This gives you a flavor for how things can look and what I mean by “prototype.”
  • If you’re intrigued…and you really want to try learning game design, there’s a few ways to get an immersive experience in it.Full-day learning game design workshop co-facilitated by Karl Kapp at myself. Possibly 1-2 more slots at ASTD ICE; just scheduled August 28th in Indy. Can also come to you.You can use Our blog is loaded with articles and resources on GBL.Can also talk to you about using Knoweldge Guru as a quick way to get started in creating a learning game
  • If you’re intrigued…and you really want to try learning game design, there’s a few ways to get an immersive experience in it.Full-day learning game design workshop co-facilitated by Karl Kapp at myself. Possibly 1-2 more slots at ASTD ICE; just scheduled August 28th in Indy. Can also come to you.You can use Our blog is loaded with articles and resources on GBL.Can also talk to you about using Knoweldge Guru as a quick way to get started in creating a learning game
  • If you’re intrigued…and you really want to try learning game design, there’s a few ways to get an immersive experience in it.Full-day learning game design workshop co-facilitated by Karl Kapp at myself. Possibly 1-2 more slots at ASTD ICE; just scheduled August 28th in Indy. Can also come to you.You can use Our blog is loaded with articles and resources on GBL.Can also talk to you about using Knoweldge Guru as a quick way to get started in creating a learning game
  • If you’re intrigued…and you really want to try learning game design, there’s a few ways to get an immersive experience in it.Full-day learning game design workshop co-facilitated by Karl Kapp at myself. Possibly 1-2 more slots at ASTD ICE; just scheduled August 28th in Indy. Can also come to you.You can use Our blog is loaded with articles and resources on GBL.Can also talk to you about using Knoweldge Guru as a quick way to get started in creating a learning game
  • First things we have to have is motiviation; without desire, we cannot learn…Games provide motivation in the form of game goals, challenges, reward structures, conflicts to overcome, etc.Relevant practice is necessary – practice ensures repetition. We cannot learn or remember for the long-haul without it. It will get lost. The loops in games - and the challenges within games – can create the relevant practice.Feedback – contributes to memory. It helps embed the CORRECT information into our memory instead of incorret information. Games offer continuous feedback – your progress or lack of progress in the game is a source of feedback in itself. Other players’ reactions, the system’s reaction – all are feedback (Think about Monopoy or cards – the process of playing and the outcomes you get by certain actions all provide feedback to you, which causes you to adjust.If we cannot retrieve the info later- it’s as though we never learned it.The forgetting curve can make retrieval almost impossible – depending on the design of the learning and the repetition provided. Ebbinghaus’s work shows we need lots of repetition to remember. We also need to space those repetitions over time.
  • Quick summary – if you had to articulate value of games and why they wrok – here’s the chart. Let Steve know if you’d like to have it. A version of it is in one of our blog posts.
  • Show POLL on forgetting.One final poll – choose the % of info that you think gets lost after someone finishes a pretty typical training course – either a “click next to continue” eLearning course where there is lots of reading or listening to narration or a webinar such as this one or a live event with an instructor who is doing a lot of “tell” with PPT slides.The current supposition is 90%. This % is derived from the work of a psychologist named Ebbinghaus. He came up with what’s known as the forgetting curve. This is a GREAT place to start a discussion of why games work – and why Knowledge Guru works.The hypthosis surrounding the forgetting curve is very old. Hermann Ebbinghau, a German psychologist formulated it. Ebbingaus was a pioneer in the study of memory. He is the guy who discovered the forgetting curve and the power of the spacing effect. ” Our ability to remember over the long-term is going to depend on lots of things – with the biggest thing being the # of repetitions we encounter over time. Each repetition allows us to “space out” the next one a bit farther and retain the information. Other factors can also influence memory – most importantly emotion – but repetition and spacing are huge. NOTE – use highlighter to show “spacing effect” on this graph.He was also the first to describe what we call the “learning curve.Games can have a serious positve impact on the forgetting curve.
  • Show POLL on forgetting.One final poll – choose the % of info that you think gets lost after someone finishes a pretty typical training course – either a “click next to continue” eLearning course where there is lots of reading or listening to narration or a webinar such as this one or a live event with an instructor who is doing a lot of “tell” with PPT slides.The current supposition is 90%. This % is derived from the work of a psychologist named Ebbinghaus. He came up with what’s known as the forgetting curve. This is a GREAT place to start a discussion of why games work – and why Knowledge Guru works.The hypthosis surrounding the forgetting curve is very old. Hermann Ebbinghau, a German psychologist formulated it. Ebbingaus was a pioneer in the study of memory. He is the guy who discovered the forgetting curve and the power of the spacing effect. ” Our ability to remember over the long-term is going to depend on lots of things – with the biggest thing being the # of repetitions we encounter over time. Each repetition allows us to “space out” the next one a bit farther and retain the information. Other factors can also influence memory – most importantly emotion – but repetition and spacing are huge. NOTE – use highlighter to show “spacing effect” on this graph.He was also the first to describe what we call the “learning curve.Games can have a serious positve impact on the forgetting curve.
  • Introdution of sel – quick reference to finding out about attendees:SHOW POLL #1

Primer on Play: Case Study for Knowledge Guru Presentation Transcript

  • 1. . A Primer on Play brought to you by Bottom-Line Performance, Inc. Featuring the Knowledge Guru™ Game engine
  • 2. Your Game Masters…aka presenters Sharon Boller President Lead designer, Knowledge Guru™ game engine. Steve Boller Marketing Strategist Developer, MobileConnect Guru game
  • 3. Using Your Controls You’ll be able to see YOUR responses/questio ns….but not anyone else’s. They won’t see yours either.
  • 4. What do we even MEAN by game? An activity that has an explicit goal or challenge, rules that guide achievement of the goal, interactivity with either other players or the game environment (or both), and feedback mechanisms that give clear cues as to how well or poorly you are performing. It results in a quantifiable outcome (you win/you lose, you hit the target, etc). Usually generates an emotional reaction in players.
  • 5. • My organization currently uses game-based learning (GBL). • My organization wants to implement game-based learning. • I want to learn more about designing them. • My organization doesn’t understand the value of game-based learning. • In my organization, games = frivolous. A Poll – What’s True for You?
  • 6. When I say game-based learning, you think…? • Video game or computer-based, desktop or laptop game. • Board game • Team-building or experiential game • Mobile game for tablet or phone. • Simulation
  • 7. Here’s some examples we’ve produced A Paycheck Away: A tabletop game about homelessness
  • 8. Here’s some examples we’ve produced The Grower Game: A digital game about growing rice
  • 9. Here’s some examples we’ve produced The Grower Game: A digital game about growing rice
  • 10. Here’s some examples we’ve produced Destroy the BBP: Avoiding blood-borne pathogens
  • 11. Today’s agenda
  • 12. • Hermann Ebbinghaus (1885) – exponential nature of forgetting. • Ability to retain information declines over time. In “schoolbook” or training settings, most students only remember about 10% after 3-6 days, meaning 90% gets lost WITHOUT REINFORCEMENT or OTHER MEANS. Red = no reinforcement. The Forgetting Curve
  • 13. Why games? Play Game “I learned SO much by playing this game. It was tons of fun. I learned more by playing this game than any webinar, meeting, or document I’ve encountered.” “Mind- blowing” “Can you create more stuff like this?”
  • 14. Why do games work? The short answer?
  • 15. Why do games work? Because they are FUN.
  • 16. But what’s FUN? • Winning • Achieving goals • Triumphing • Collaborating • Exploring and building • Collecting • Problem-solving or strategizing • Role playing or imagining • Surprise – surprising others and being surprised ourselves.
  • 17. What’s Required to Learn? Relevant Practice Specific, timely feedback Ability to retrieve later Risk of Forgetting Curve!!!
  • 18. Examples: Feedback Loops “The premise of a feedback loop is simple: Provide people with information about their actions in real time, then give them a chance to change those actions, pushing them toward better behaviors.” Wired Magazine, June 19, 2011 www.bottomlineperformance.com
  • 19. Linking Games to Learning Learning Element Game Elements that Match Motivation Game goals or challenges, conflict, time, cooperation, reward structures (feedback, points, achievements), - all help equate to the “fun” in games. Relevant practice Game goal or challenges, rules within game, reward structures, game loops Feedback Pretty much a 1:1 here – reward structures in game supply feedback. “Game loop” also supplies feedback Retrieval later Lots of ways games help with retrieval: Context, story, desire for repeat play, emotion attached to game play.
  • 20. Today’s agenda
  • 21. ExactTarget (NYSE: ET) They have:  1,500 employees worldwide  250,000 users worldwide  500 + partners worldwide
  • 22. Why ExactTarget wanted our Guru game 1. Multiple Product Lines and Multiple Product Launches • 9 distinct product lines within organization • Product line releases each month 2. Employees, clients, and partners had training overload; ET needed to find a way to “mix it up.” 3. MobileConnect was one of the largest product launches ever. Critical to educate folks. 4. ET’s Scott Thomas had played Guru; liked it. Wanted to try it.
  • 23. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  • 24. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  • 25. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  • 26. What is the Knowledge Guru? A solution to a problem we’ve seen a lot with our clients.
  • 27. We wanted… For people to be able to PLAY. For them to LEARN while they played. For clients to TRACK what people were learning (or not learning). And for players to REMEMBER, long after they played. Play Game
  • 28. We wanted… For people to be able to PLAY. For them to LEARN while they played. For clients to TRACK what people were learning (or not learning). And for players to REMEMBER, long after they played. And…we wanted people to be able to play across multiple devices: desktop, iPad, or Android tablet via web app or native app. We wanted a solution that could work independently of an LMS…or be Tin Can compliant so it COULD work with an LMS Play Game
  • 29. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  • 30. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  • 31. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  • 32. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  • 33. How Guru does Measurement Admin tool lets you verify what people do – and don’t get
  • 34. Positioning the game 2. Marketed the heck out of it. 1. Reinforcement tactic rather than primary learning method.
  • 35. Positioning the game (cont.) 3. Required in some functional units. 4. Provided managers with idea kits. 5. Drew attention to leaderboards on a regular basis.
  • 36. What Did Folks Say… The game was great! It was a fun way to learn about MobileConnect. I enjoyed the scenario-type questions, which put it all in perspective.
  • 37. What Did Folks Say… The game was great! It was a fun way to learn about MobileConnect. I enjoyed the scenario-type questions, which put it all in perspective. I’m a pretty competitive person, so challenging myself to get one of the top scores added a layer of fun to learning about the MobileConnect product.
  • 38. What Did Folks Say… The game was great! It was a fun way to learn about MobileConnect. I enjoyed the scenario-type questions, which put it all in perspective. I’m a pretty competitive person, so challenging myself to get one of the top scores added a layer of fun to learning about the MobileConnect product.The repetition of the different paths helped me retain the information.
  • 39. Business Results… Annika, Age 8
  • 40. Business Results… Annika, Age 8
  • 41. Business Results… Annika, Age 8
  • 42. Today’s agenda
  • 43. Sounds GREAT but how do I get started? Play games; evaluate what you are playing Get familiar w/ game elements & how to use them. Think about the learning – and then the game. Dump ADDIE. Go agile instead. Playtest.Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  • 44. Play games; evaluate what you are playing
  • 45. Play games; evaluate what you are playing
  • 46. Get familiar with game elements & how to use them Goal Story Aesthetics Resources Time* Conflict Competition Cooperation Dynamics Levels Boundaries Outcome Rules & Procedures Reward Structures
  • 47. Define learning need, then game concepts
  • 48. Define learning need, then game concepts  What problem are you trying to solve?  Is it a learning problem…or caused by something else?  What does learner need to know/do to achieve game outcome?  What is current skill level of players?  What are the logistics re: when/how game will be played?  What are technical requirements/constraints? You start by asking the same questions you would ask for other learning solutions:
  • 49. Define learning need, then game concepts  What problem are you trying to solve?  Is it a learning problem…or caused by something else?  What does learner need to know/do to achieve game outcome?  What is current skill level of players?  What are the logistics re: when/how game will be played?  What are technical requirements/constraints? You start by asking the same questions you would ask for other learning solutions:
  • 50. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  • 51. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  • 52. Dump ADDIE; go agile instead (iterative) Playtest. Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  • 53. Splash/title screen Phil screen – game orientation Territory or orientation ? Overview of formulations Formulations game (territory map) with 5 customer sites available. (4 sites grayed out on first entrance). Once a customer is selected from territory map…. Easy to hard, challeng e, or back to main map? Question 1: multiple choice Question 1 feedback Question 2: multiple choice Question 3: multiple choice Question 2 feedback Question 3 feedback Challenge scenario Ask customer questions Talk to Phil Review past issue Respond Within challenge scenario, learner can return to main “challenge” screen from any of the four “options” screens listed here. They will increase their customer satisfaction and sales scores the more things they check out. When they respond incorrectly, they will detract from their customer sat and sales and increase customer complaints. A correct response will increase customer sat and sales and decrease customer complaints. They cannot leave challenge until they’ve responded to customer. Learners can choose from two paths: easy to hard or straight to the challenge. In “easy to hard” path, learners receive 3 multiple-choice questions. Correct responses will improve customer sat and sales and decrease complaints. Incorrect responses will have the opposite effect. After completing “easy,” learners can return to main map or go onto the challenge scenario. At start of course, learner sees “splash” screen with course title and then is greeted by Phil, the learning agent. Phil orients learner to purpose of game and then offers choice: get overview of formulations or go straight to territory and game play. Doing orientation FIRST will improve sat and sales ratings and decrease complaints. From orientation, learner can also travel to territory.
  • 54. Raul’s Easy Questions You answered all easy questions – return to Customer home Customer home
  • 55. Insert challenge description here. Raul: Can I store this? Raul has questions related to storage. Your potential sales with Raul are 180,000 gilders. You can start with easy questions or try the challenge right away. Answer easy questions
  • 56. Ask Raul questions Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Question 4 Customer home
  • 57. Customer home Talk to Phil
  • 58. Customer home Review Raul’s past issue Past issue described here.
  • 59. Respond to Raul:
  • 60. Rough/Dirty mockups of game flow. 65
  • 61. We hate to be the bearers of bad news, but something BAD is about to happen. 66 Game Opening. Would dissolve into opportunity to select expert cohort.
  • 62. Before calamity strikes, please select from among these highly qualified experts to assist you. 67 Dr. Steve Music
  • 63. 68 Newscast video Once expert cohort selected, player is taken to screen with video player. Video auto launches. AT conclusion of video, you’re “taken” directly to bunker (next slide)
  • 64. Expert’s bunker: start here. Click Map to see all Recruitment Center locations. Bunker will be on map. Player returns to bunker between levels to exchange resources 69 Expert’s directions communicated via talk bubbles. Resource Shelf Brief Case Game map Available powerups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally
  • 65. Game Map 70Brief Case Game map Available power-ups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally Recruitment Center 1 Recruitment Center 2 Recruitment Center 3 Recruitment Center 4 Recruitment Center 5 Dr. Music’s bunker
  • 66. Level Map 71Brief Case Game map Available power-ups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally Recruitment Center 1 Alien’s directions/explanatory info communicated via talk bubbles. Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game Icon/Thumbnail for mini-game
  • 67. Mini Game 72Brief Case Game map Available power-ups X X X No.ofexperts Your tally Martians’ tally Back to Recruitment Center “Mini-game – earn 1, 2, or 3 stars based on performance. Expert cohort Great way to get us all killed! Check XYZ in your briefcase try again if you want anyone to survive.
  • 68. Want More? Tell us via poll • I want more info on workshops or tools that can help me learn how to learn to design learning games. • I want more info on using Knowledge Guru to create games. • I want info on online resources that can help me learn more about game-based learning and serious games. • I’m good with what I got – nothing further for me.
  • 69. Want more?
  • 70. Want more?
  • 71. Want more? August 28, 2013 – Indianapolis, IN Play games; evaluate learning /fun factors? Link games to learning; identify appropriate reward structures and best games types for various situations Master the lingo; create your own learning game. Playtest your paper prototype; revise.
  • 72. What else can I do? I can’t go to those workshops. How else can I get help? • Call us or email us; we can do a learning game design work shop for your specific project: – (317) 861-5935; we can help you get started! – sharon@bottomlineperformance.com • Stay on our email list; we send stuff out monthly:
  • 73. Quiz Time!
  • 74. Q1) What 4 things are required for people to Learn? Relevant Practice Specific, timely feedback Ability to retrieve later
  • 75. Q2) What game elements link to the learning elements? Learning Element Game Elements that Match Motivation Game goals or challenges, conflict, time, cooperation, reward structures (feedback, points, achievements), - all help equate to the “fun” in games. Relevant practice Game goal or challenges, rules within game, reward structures, game loops Feedback Pretty much a 1:1 here – reward structures in game supply feedback. “Game loop” also supplies feedback Retrieval later Lots of ways games help with retrieval: Context, story, desire for repeat play, emotion attached to game play.
  • 76. Q3) What % of information do people forget after 3 days w/out repetition? 90%
  • 77. Q4) I mentioned 5 steps for getting started in game design. How many can you list? Play games; evaluate what you are playing Get familiar w/ game elements & how to use them. Think about the learning – and then the game. Dump ADDIE. Go agile instead. Playtest.Playtest. Did I say playtest?
  • 78. Final Questions for me? ?????