Is "Ingredient" a 10-Letter Word For Financial Disaster?
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Is "Ingredient" a 10-Letter Word For Financial Disaster?

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Bill Marler's presentation at the 2010 IAFP conference in Anaheim, California about the general risks of food production. Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm.

Bill Marler's presentation at the 2010 IAFP conference in Anaheim, California about the general risks of food production. Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm.

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Is "Ingredient" a 10-Letter Word For Financial Disaster? Is "Ingredient" a 10-Letter Word For Financial Disaster? Presentation Transcript

  • Is “Ingredient” a 10-letter word for Financial Disaster?
    IAFP Annual MeetingAnaheim, CAAugust 1-4 2010
    William D. Marler, Esq.
  • Sizzler Restaurant/Excel Corporation Beef and Cross Contamination 2000
    • Layton and Mayfair Sizzler Restaurants, in Wisconsin, between July 15th and 19th developed E. coli O157:H7.
    • Sixty-two of the laboratory-confirmed cases were found to be genetically indistinguishable, proving that all of the cases had a common source.
    • 551 probable cases and 1 death.
  • Sizzler Restaurant/Excel Corporation Beef and Cross Contamination 2000
    • This contaminated meat was manufactured by the Excel Corp. (a subsidiary of Cargill), and then re-manufactured by the local Sizzler franchisee.
    • The outbreak was caused when employees cross-contaminated fresh watermelon with raw meat products. Raw sirloin tri-tips were the source of the E.coli O157:H7.
    • Restaurants closed and never reopened.
  • Chi Chi’s Restaurant 2003
    • Over 660 confirmed hepatitis A cases.
    • Victims included at least 13 employees of the Chi Chi’s restaurant. Four persons died.
    • More than 9,000 persons who had eaten at the restaurant, or who had been exposed, were given an injection of immune globulin.
    • The outbreak was associated with eating raw, or undercooked, green onions.
  • Chi Chi’s Restaurant 2003
    • The onions had been grown in Mexico.
    • Viral sequence of the outbreak strain was similar to the viral sequences obtained from persons involved in another hepatitis A outbreak occurring in September 2003. Green onions were also implicated.
    • Just prior to the outbreak Chi Chi’s had filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
  • Cargill Ground Beef 2007
    • A multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in October led to the recall of 845,000 lbs. of Cargill ground beef.
    • In early October a Minnesota health dept. official noticed a cluster of three E. coli O157:H7 cases with the same pulse-field gel genetic pattern.
  • Cargill Ground Beef 2007
    • Interviews with the case-patients found a common exposure of Cargill hamburger.
    • Wisconsin, North Carolina, and Tennessee also had victims with matching genetic patterns and exposure to Cargill hamburger.
    • Sam’s Club stores, a major purchaser of Cargill hamburgers, pulled their ground beef products. 46 were ill.
    • Multiple sources of meat products. Including meat from BPI and Uruguay.
    • Cargill still operating.
  • Peanut Corp. of America, Peanut Butter & Peanut Butter – Containing Products 2008
    • Peanut butter and peanut butter containing products produced by the Peanut Corp. of America were implicated.
    • King Nut brand was sold to institutional settings. Peanut paste was sold to food companies and peanut products were sold throughout the USA, 23 countries and non-U.S. territories.
  • Peanut Corp. of America, Peanut Butter & Peanut Butter – Containing Products 2008
    • Despite numerous product recalls beginning in Jan. 2009, the wide dispersement of peanut products, a long shelf life and multiple labeling made it impossible to assure that all sources of the product were eliminated.
    • 714 people ill, 9 deaths.
    • Hundreds of millionsin recall costs.
    • Bankruptcy and possible jail time.
  • For More Information…
    Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm
    Food Safety News
    About Salmonella
    About E. coli
    About Hepatitis A
  • Questions