Cesar working document 6 us experiment 4

422 views
293 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
422
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
89
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cesar working document 6 us experiment 4

  1. 1.     CESAR  WORKING  DOCUMENT  SERIES   Working  document  no.6                 Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Randomized  controlled  trial  No4       M.  te  Brömmelstroet     13  April  2014             This  working  document  series  is  a  joint  initiative  of  the  University  of  Amsterdam,    Utrecht  University,  Wageningen  University  and   Research  centre  and  TNO               The  research  that  is  presented  in  this  series  is  financed  by  the  NWO  program  on  Sustainable  Accessibility  of  the  Randstad:   http://dbr.verdus.nl/pagina.asp?id=750            
  2. 2. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  2     TABLE  OF  CONTENT   1.   INTRODUCTION  ...............................................................................................................  3   2.   SETUP  OF  THE  EXPERIMENT  ............................................................................................  4   2.1   Intervention:  Urban  Strategy  PSS  .........................................................................................  4   2.2   Mechanisms:  how  does  Urban  Strategy  bridge  the  PSS  implementation  gap?  ...................  4   2.3   Setup  of  the  controlled  randomized  trial  .............................................................................  5      Student  groups  ...........................................................................................................................  5      Control  versus  treatment  ...........................................................................................................  6   2.4   Data  gathering  and  analysis  ..................................................................................................  7   3.   EVALUATION  RESULTS  .....................................................................................................  9   3.1   Perceived  quality  of  the  planning  process  ............................................................................  9   3.2   Perceived  quality  of  the  planning  outcome  ..........................................................................  9   3.3   Effectiveness  .......................................................................................................................  10   3.4   Usability  characteristics  of  Urban  Strategy  ........................................................................  11   4.   CONCLUSIONS  AND  IMPLICATIONS  ...............................................................................  12   4.1   Reflections  ..........................................................................................................................  12   4.2   General  conclusions  ...........................................................................................................  12   REFERENCES  ..........................................................................................................................  14   APPENDIX  I:  COMPETITION  SHEET  (DUTCH)  .........................................................................  15   APPENDIX  II:  EVALUATION  FORM  FOR  QUALITY  OF  THE  PROCES  ........................................  17   APPENDIX  III:  EVALUATION  FORM  FOR  QUALITY  OF  THE  OUTCOME…………………………………  21   APPENDIX  IV:  EVALUATION  FORM  FOR  USABILITY  OF  URBAN  STRATEGY………………………..   22      
  3. 3. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  3     1. INTRODUCTION   In  this  working  document  we  report  on  a  fourth  randomized  controlled  trial  with  Urban  Strategy  to   test  the  added  value  of  this  Planning  Support  System  (PSS).  Urban  Strategy  is  a  software  package   developed  by  TNO  that  aims  to  improve  the  planning  process  and  planning  outcomes  of  strategic   planning.   It   does   so   by   offering   a   range   of   quick   models   that   show   the   effects   of   planning   interventions   in   an   easy   to   understand   visual   environment.   To   gain   more   insight   into   these   potential   improvements,   we   have   conducted   an   experiment   with   a   group   of   master   students   in   Urban   Planning   of   the   University   of   Amsterdam.   We   make   use   of   the   measuring   framework   as   introduced  and  discussed  in  CESAR  Working  Document  No.  1.       First,  we  describe  the  setup  of  the  experiment  (section  2).  Then,  the  findings  of  the  experiment  are   presented  (section  3).  In  the  fourth  section  we  will  briefly  discuss  the  implications  of  these  findings   and  further  research.        
  4. 4. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  4     2. SETUP  OF  THE  EXPERIMENT   2.1 Intervention:  Urban  Strategy  PSS   TNO  started  around  2005  with  the  development  of  a  PSS  –  Urban  Strategy  (Borst  et  al.  2007;  2009a;   2009b)  –  specifically  aiming  to  bridge  the  existing  flexibility-­‐  and  communication  bottlenecks.  Urban   Strategy  aims  to  improve  complex  spatial  planning  processes  on  the  urban-­‐  and  regional  level.  To   do   this,   different   computer   models   are   linked   to   a   central   database   and   interface   to   provide   insights  in  a  wide  area  of  urban  indicators  and  maps.  The  effects  of  interventions  in  infrastructure,   land  use,  build  objects  and  their  functions  can  be  calculated  and  visualized.  Because  the  PSS  is  able   to  calculate  fast  and  present  the  results  in  an  attractive  1D,  2D  and  3D  visualisation  this  can  be  used   in  interactive  sessions  with  planning  actors.       Starting  point  for  Urban  Strategy  is  the  use  of  existing  state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art  and  legally  accepted  models.   To  link  these  existing  models  a  number  of  new  elements  were  developed:   - a  database  with  an  uniform  datamodel;   - interfaces  that  show  a  3D  image  of  the  modeled  situation,  indicators  and  that  offer  functionality   to  add  interventions;   - a  framework  that  structures  the  communication  between  the  models  and  the  interfaces.       2.2 Mechanisms:  how  does  Urban  Strategy  bridge  the  PSS  implementation  gap?   The  goal  of  Urban  Strategy  is  to  enable  planning  actors  in  workshop  sessions  to  communicate  their   ideas  and  strategies  to  the  PSS  and  to  learn  from  the  effects  that  are  shown.  This  interactivity  calls   for  fast  calculations  of  all  the  model  and  fast  communication  between  all  elements.  For  this,  the   models   were   enabled   to   respond   on   events   (urban   interventions   from   the   participants   in   the   workshops.  A  new  software  architecture  was  developed  to  have  all  these  elements  communicate   (figure  2).     Through  this  increases  speed  and  the  wide  variety  of  models  that  are  linked  together,  the  PSS  aims   to   be   highly   flexible   in   offering   answers   to   a   large   number   of   questions   that   a   group   of   urban   planning  actors  can  have.     Figure  2      Schematic  overview  of  communication  architecture  of  Urban  Strategy.         The  3D  interface  generates,  based  on  objects  in  the  database,  a  3D  digital  maquette  of  the  urban   environment.  To  this,  different  information  layers  can  be  addes,  such  as  air  quality  contours,  noise   contours  and  groundwater  levels.  Also,  the  objects  can  be  colored  according  to  their  characteristics   (function,  energy  use,  CO2  emissions,  number  of  inhabitants,  etc).  The  2D  interface  can  be  used  by   the  end  user  (or  operator)  to  add  changes  to  the  database.  Objects  can  be  added  or  removed,  their  
  5. 5. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  5     location  can  be  changed  and  the  characteristics  of  the  object  can  be  changed.  The  1D  interface   shows   indicators   that   are   calculated   by   all   the   models   that   are   included.   Examples   are   the   percentage  of  noise  hindrance,  group  risk  in  an  area  or  the  contribution  of  types  of  objects  to  CO2   emission.       Figure  3      The  three  interfaces  of  Urban  Strategy             2.3 Setup  of  the  controlled  randomized  trial     We  designed  our  study  as  a  randomized  controlled  laboratory  experiment.  With  this  we  aimed  to   optimize  the  internal  and  external  validity  of  our  findings.  Testing  the  most  general  claim  of  the  PSS   literature  (that  it  improves  planning)  calls  for  a  strong  focus  on  the  ability  to  translate  our  findings   to  theory.  Although  we  have  had  special  attention  to  mirror  characteristics  of  urban  planning   practice  as  good  as  possible  (see  below),  this  means  a  sacrifice  of  ecological  validity.     Student  groups   The  experiment  was  set  up  as  an  obligatory  part  of  a  second  year  course  of  the  Bachelor  Urban   Planning  at  the  University  of  Amsterdam  in  November  2012.  A  total  of  78  students  participated.   They  were  informed  that  they  took  part  in  an  urban  planning  competition.  These  students  were   randomly  divided  into  groups  of  six.  Within  each  group,  each  student  was,  again  randomly,   assigned  one  of  six  planning  roles  and  received  information  about  the  plan  (see  below)  that  was   relevant  for  his/her  specialism  and  a  specific  goal  for  the  planning  session.  Each  group  consisted  of:   -­‐ 1 Environmental specialist (air quality) -­‐ 1 Environmental specialist (External safety) -­‐ 1 Environmental specialist (sound) -­‐ 1 Urban Designer -­‐ 1 Transport specialist -­‐ 1 Project economist Each  of  the  13  groups  got  the  same  planning  challenge  for  an  infill  area  in  the  old  harbors  of   Rotterdam  (figure  4).  They  were  presented  with  an  existing  design  for  the  area  (figure  5)  and  the   corresponding  problems  (each  role  had  their  own  knowledge  of  specific  problematic  effects  of  the   plan)  and  were  asked  to  develop  a  new  plan  that  would  solve  these  issues  as  good  as  possible  in  a   session  of  60  minutes.    
  6. 6. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  6         Fig.  4.  Brownfield  location  in  the  old  harbors  of  Rotterdam       Fig.  5.  Original  design  for  the  area  provided  to  each  group       Control  versus  treatment   The  resulting  thirteen  groups  were,  again  randomly,  divided  into  six  control-­‐  and  seven  treatment   groups.  The  control  groups  received  no  support;  they  were  assigned  to  a  table  with  empty  plans,   instructed  to  start,  and  informed  that  the  time  was  up.  These  six  groups  worked  simultaneously  in   one  room.  See  figure  6  for  both  set  ups.     Fig.  6.  Setup  of  control  and  treatment:  PSS  with  surface  table,  chauffeur  and  process  moderator  (left)  and  the  business-­‐ as-­‐usual  table  (right)                    
  7. 7. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  7     The  treatment  groups  got  the  full  support  of  the  abovementioned  Urban  Strategy  PSS.  In  this   experiment  we  have  especially  focussed  on  improving  the  process  support.  This  is  one  of  the   recommendations  of  our  ealier  study:  having  more  attention  for  the  learning  process  of  the  group.   Accordingly,  we  have  structured  the  interaction  between  the  PSS  and  the  participants.  First,  they   were  asked  to  develop  ideas  for  interventions  (15  minutes),  then  they  interacted  with  a  service   table  and  were  presented  with  the  effects  of  the  proposed  interventions  (15  minutes).  The   remaining  time  was  used  to  iterate  between  redesigning  and  reanalyzing  the  interventions.         2.4 Data  gathering  and  analysis   To  find  out  if  there  are  any  systematic  differences  in  the  performance  of  the  control-­‐  and  treatment   groups  we  have  made  use  of  several  data  gathering  techniques.  In  general,  we  used  the  framework   for  quality  of  planning  as  presented  on  the  2013  CUPUM  conference.  See  table  1  for  the   dimensions  and  subdimensions  that  were  measured.     Table  1.  Dimensions  of  the  quality  of  planning         First,  two  external  planning  experts  (PhD  candidates  in  Urban  Planning  of  the  University  of   Amsterdam)  rated  the  general  quality  of  the  resulting  strategies.  For  each  strategy,  they  were   asked  to  respond  to  statements  on  the  dimensions  A  to  F  of  table  1  (on  a  7  point  Likert  scale).  They   were  not  informed  of  the  hypothesis,  nor  were  they  aware  of  which  strategies  came  from  control-­‐   or  treatment  groups.       As  a  second  way  to  assess  the  more  specific  quality  of  the  outcomes,  the  effects  of  all  strategies   were  calculated  with  Urban  Strategy.  The  instrument  adds  specific  knowledge  to  the  planning   process,  with  the  aim  to  improve  the  strategies  especially  on  specific  subjects:  external  safety,   noise,  air  quality,  mobility  and  project  finances.  Without  knowing  which  strategies  were  from   control-­‐  or  treatment  groups  two  Urban  Strategies  experts  assessed  how  well  the  strategies  met   criteria  for  these  five  subjects  on  a  10-­‐point  scale.  The  heuristics  used  were:  
  8. 8. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  8     -­‐ External safety: Bonus for minimizing number of houses in 10-6 contour (northern pier and head of middle pier), offices used as shield, displacement of sources. -­‐ Noise: Bonus for minimizing number of houses in 48Db contour, offices used as shield, effective use of deepening road, tunnels, screens, and noise reducing asphalt, reducing maximum speed, reducing number of severely noise hampered -­‐ Air quality: Bonus for explicit ideas on air quality improvements (there are no legal problems in the area) -­‐ Mobility: Bonus for introducing new or strengthening existing modes, improving flow of traffic by roundabouts or road extension, bridging the piers. Malus for lowering maximum speed, limiting access to or closing down streets -­‐ Project finance: Bonus for staying within budget of 2 million Euros, malus for displacement of external safety sources   Thirdly,  all  participants  filled  in  an  evaluation  form  in  which  we  solicited  their  personal  perceptions   of  the  process.  They  responded  to  statements  relating  to  the  dimensions  J-­‐W  of  table  1.  And   fourthly,  we  have  used  direct  observation:  in  real  time  (by  a  fourth  person),  and  by  video-­‐  and   audiotaping.  These  observations  were  mainly  used  to  understand  the  outcomes  of  the  first  three   analysis  instruments.     For  the  analysis,  the  responses  on  the  statements  were  averaged  and  then  compared  and  tested   for  systematic  differences.  To  indicate  the  strength  of  the  differences  in  effects,  we  used  the  p-­‐ value  of  a  ANOVA  F-­‐test  to  compare  two  independent  means  (<0,05  is  considered  statistical   significant).  The  statements  were  grouped  for  the  subdimensions  and  overall  dimensions  by   averaging  them.  The  two  statements  on  conflict  were  first  inverted  to  make  them  compatible  with   this  process.  For  the  outcome  dimensions,  the  scores  of  the  raters  were  also  averaged  and  then   processed  in  the  same  way.     Finally,  we  asked  all  participants  in  the  treatment  group  to  rate  Urban  Strategy  on  a  number  of   usability  indicators,  using  a  7-­‐point  Likert  scale.       NOTE:  There  were  thirteen  groups  of  which  seven  received  our  treatment.  During  the  first   treatment  session,  there  were  severe  problems  with  the  process  and  with  the  support  by  Urban   Strategy.  A  quick  scan  showed  that  this  significantly  influenced  the  results  of  this  group.  For  the   purpose  of  this  research,  the  results  of  this  group  were  excluded  from  further  analysis.    
  9. 9. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  9     3. EVALUATION  RESULTS   3.1 Perceived  quality  of  the  planning  process   Overall,  we  see  a  (small)  positive  effect  of  Urban  Strategy  support  for  the  perceived  quality  of  the   planning  process.  In  figure  7  and  8,  all  dimensions  are  displayed.  The  dimensions  with  a  star  have  a   statistically  significant  difference.  The  only  dimension  that  scored  lower  in  the  treatment  was   cohesion.       Fig.  7.  Scores  for  control  and  treatment  groups  on  all  proces  dimensions  (7-­‐point  scale)       Fig.  8.    Differences  between  control  and  treatment  scores  (7-­‐point  scale)       3.2 Perceived  quality  of  the  planning  outcome   The  quality  of  the  planning  outcome  (at  right  in  table  2)  is  affected  negatively  by  the  support  of   Urban  Strategy.  Only  the  negative  effect  on  implicational  explicitness  is  statistically  significant.                      
  10. 10. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  10     Fig.  9.  Scores  for  control  and  treatment  groups  on  all  content  dimensions  (7-­‐point  scale)           Fig.  10.    Differences  between  control  and  treatment  scores  (7-­‐point  scale)         3.3 Effectiveness   Urban  Strategy  has  a  small  positive  effect  on  the  effectiveness  of  the  strategies.  Especially  the  noise   and  mobility  problems  were  better  solved  by  the  treatment  groups  (figure  11).       Fig.  11.    Effectiveness    (10-­‐point  scale)              
  11. 11. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  11     3.4 Usability  characteristics  of  Urban  Strategy   The  participants  responded  to  16  statements  (1  =  very  much  disagree;  7  =  ery  much  agree).  From   that,  we  see  that  the  perceived  Urban  Strategy  as  fairly  usable.  Especially  efficiency,  clear  output   and  supporting  sketching  and  evaluation  score  well.  The  focus  of  Urban  Strategy  and  the   understanding  of  indicators  score  low.  Figure  12  shows  the  scores  per  role.  We  see  that  the  urban   designer  and  safety  expert  are  least  satisfied  regarding  usability.         Fig.  11.    Average  usability  scores  of  42  participants  (7-­‐point  scale)           Fig.  12.    Average  usability  scores  per  role  (7-­‐point  scale)    
  12. 12.     4. CONCLUSIONS  AND  IMPLICATIONS     4.1 Reflections   There  are  several  important  reflections  to  make  on  the  methodology  that  have  serious  implications   for  the  results  and  their  generalizability.  The  laboratory  setup  with  students  allows  for  strong   control  over  the  treatment  and  control  groups,  but  it  also  simplifies  the  complexity  of  daily   planning  practice  on  some  important  aspects  (which  is  the  target  application  of  Urban  Strategy).   The  most  important  ones  are  listed  below.       Students:  In  the  context  of  planning  practice,  the  student  population  of  this  experiment  can  be   considered  as  being  empty  vessels.  They  do  not  have  much  tacit  knowledge  about  the  issues  in  the   Waalhaven  case;  neither  do  they  have  vested  interests  or  accountability  for  it.  This  makes  the   experiment  relatively  insensitive  for  some  important  effects  that  can  be  expected  in  real  planning   practice,  such  as  developing  a  shared  language  or  gaining  consensus.  Related  to  that,  we  would  also   expect  to  see  more  effects  on  the  quality  of  the  planning  outcome  in  such  a  practical  environment.       Group  size:  Due  to  the  limited  amount  of  students,  each  planning  group  consisted  of  three   students.  This  makes  the  experiment  relatively  insensitive  for  effects  on  group  dynamics.  In   planning  practice  we  expect  much  larger  groups  that  generate  much  more  (negative  and  positive)   group  dynamics.  Then,  we  would  also  expect  to  see  a  bigger  effect  of  Urban  Strategy  as  either   supporting  or  hampering  these  group  dynamics.       First  timers:  A  large  majority  of  the  students  stated  in  the  open  question  that  they  enjoyed  the   strategy  making  exercise,  since  they  never  did  this  before.  This  is  mirrored  in  the  relatively  high   scores  on  the  process  dimensions  (such  as  satisfaction)  by  the  students  in  the  control  group.  Again,   this  makes  the  experiment  less  sensitive  for  process  effects  that  would  be  expected  in  planning   practice.  Here,  the  participants  would  have  much  more  (negative  and  positive)  experiences  with   similar  processes  and  are  better  able  to  assess  the  added  value  of  Urban  Strategy.  Also,  they  would   be  able  to  score  the  instrument  characteristics  (table  3)  more  in  relation  to  other  instruments.   Related  to  that,  we  cannot  assume  that  the  control  group  worked  as  ‘business  as  usual’.       Small  population:  17  students  (one  person  did  not  show  up)  divided  into  groups  of  three  is  a  too   low  amount  to  control  for  other  possibly  important  effects  on  the  quality  of  the  process  and   outcome.  Although  the  students  were  randomly  divided  into  control  and  treatment,  it  can  still  be   that  one  or  two  very  experienced  students  can  influence  the  results.       Raters:  Due  to  time  constraints,  we  worked  with  external  raters  from  TNO.  For  them  it  was  difficult   to  assess  some  of  the  quality  dimensions  of  the  planning  outcome.  This  affected  both  their   judgment  of  the  control  and  treatment  planning  outcomes,  which  makes  its  implications  less   relevant.       4.2 General  conclusions     With   these   methodological   limitations   in   mind,   the   experiment   has   offered   us   some   interesting   insights  on  the  use  and  usability  of  instruments  such  as  Urban  Strategy.  First  of  all,  the  students   that  were  supported  with  Urban  Strategy,  strongly  appreciated  the  instrument.  It  is  perceived  as   easy  to  understand,  as  supporting  creating  and  evaluating  ideas  and  as  being  transparent  and  user-­‐ friendly  (all  score  above  5  on  a  1-­‐7  scale).  This  high  usability  score  is  a  crucial  prerequisite  for  the   expected  use  of  the  instrument.    
  13. 13. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  13     Compared   to   earlier   experiments,   we   found   that   improving   the   process   support   resulted   in   a   significant  positive  impact  of  Urban  Strategy  on  the  perceived  process  quality.  Although  expected,   it  is  interesting  to  see  that  by  these  small  improvements  all  dimensions  were  positively  influenced,   with  the  exception  of  cohesion.       There   has   been   found   no   significant   impacts   of   Urban   Strategy   on   the   planning   outcome   dimensions.  This  means  that  the  external  raters  from  Amsterdam  could  not  find  any  differences  in   the  quality  of  the  strategies  developed  by  the  control  and  treatment  groups.  Again,  although  this   can  be  partly  explained  by  the  starting  position  of  the  students,  this  is  something  that  developers   have  to  take  into  account.    
  14. 14. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  14     REFERENCES   Al,  J.,  &  van  Tilburg,  W.  (2005).  Basisboek  instrumenten  regionale  bereikbaarheid.  Rotterdam:   Rijkswaterstaat  AVV.   Couclelis,  H.  (2005).  “Where  has  the  future  gone?”  Rethinking  the  role  of  integrated  land-­‐use   models  in  spatial  planning.  Environment  and  Planning  A,  37,  1353-­‐1371.   Dean,  D.  L.,  Hender,  J.  M.,  Rodgers,  T.  L.,  &  Santanen,  E.  L.  (2006).  Identifying  Quality,  Novel,  and   Creative  Ideas:Constructs  and  Scales  for  Idea  Evaluation.  Journal  of  the  Association  for   Information  Systems,  7,  646-­‐699.   Friedmann,  J.  (1987).  Planning  in  the  public  domain:  From  knowledge  to  action.  Princeton:   Princeton  University  Press.   Klosterman,  R.  (1999).  The  What  If?  collaborative  planning  support  system.  Environment  and   Planning  A,  26,  393-­‐408.   Lee,  D.  B.  (1973).  Requiem  for  large-­‐scale  models.  Journal  of  the  American  Planning  Association,  39,   pp.  163-­‐178.   Lee,  D.  B.  (1994).  Retrospective  on  large-­‐scale  urban  models.  Journal  of  the  American  Planning   Association,  60,  35-­‐40.   Rittel,  H.,  &  Webber,  M.  (1984).  Dilemmas  in  a  general  theory  of  planning.  In  N.  Cross  (Ed.),   Developments  in  design  methodology  pp.  135-­‐144).  Chicester:  John  Wiley  and  Sons.   Rouwette,  E.  A.  J.  A.,  Vennix,  J.  A.  M.,  &  Van  Mullekom,  T.  (2002).  Group  model  building   effectiveness:  a  review  of  assessment  studies.  System  Dynamics  Review,  18,  5-­‐45.   Te  Brömmelstroet,  M.  (2010).  Equip  the  warrior  instead  of  manning  the  equipment:  Land  use  and   transport  planning  support  in  the  Netherlands.  Journal  of  Transport  and  Land  Use,  3,  25-­‐41.   Te  Brömmelstroet,  M.  (2011).  What  do  we  support  and  how  (well)  do  we  do  it?  A  multidimensional   framework  to  measure  the  effectiveness  of  Planning  Support  Systems.  Environment  and   Planning  B:  Planning  and  Design,  submitted.   Te  Brömmelstroet,  M.,  &  Schrijnen,  P.  M.  (2010).  From  Planning  Support  Systems  to  Mediated   Planning  Support:  A  structured  dialogue  to  overcome  the  implementation  gap.  Environment   and  Planning  B:  Planning  and  Design,  37,  3-­‐20.   Vonk,  G.  (2006).  Improving  planning  support;  The  use  of  planning  support  systems  for  spatial   planning.  Utrecht:  Nederlandse  Geografische  Studies.   Vonk,  G.,  &  Ligtenberg,  A.  (2009).  Socio-­‐technical  PSS  development  to  improve  functionality  and   usability—Sketch  planning  using  a  Maptable.  Landscape  and  Urban  Planning,   doi:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2009.10.001           Waddell,  P.  (2002).  UrbanSim:  Modeling  Urban  Development  for  Land  Use,  Transportation  and   Environmental  Planning.  Journal  of  the  American  Planning  Association,  68,  297-­‐314.   Waddell,  P.  (2011).  Integrated  Land  Use  and  Transportation  Planning  and  Modelling:  Addressing   Challenges  in  Research  and  Practice.  Transport  Reviews,  31,  209-­‐229.        
  15. 15. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  15     APPENDIX  I:  COMPETITION  SHEET  (DUTCH)   Introductie   De  Rotterdamse  haven  groeit  nog  steeds,  maar  deze  groei  speelt  zich  steeds  meer  ten  Westen   van  de  stad  af.  Omdat  de  havenindustrie  steeds  grootschaliger  wordt,  verschuiven   havenfuncties  naar  nieuwe  gebieden  zoals  de  Tweede  Maasvlakte.  De  hierdoor  vrijkomende   gebieden  zijn  aantrekkelijke  locaties  voor  stedelijke  transformatie:  ze  liggen  relatief  dicht  bij   de  binnenstad  en  bieden  in  combinatie  met  het  water  interessante  mogelijkheden  voor  wonen,   werken  en  recreatie.  Naast  deze  mogelijkheden  zijn  er  uiteraard  ook  grote  uitdagingen,  zoals   de  aanwezigheid  van  industrie  en  afwezigheid  van  stedelijke  infrastructuur.     Eén  van  de  gebieden  die  momenteel  voor  zo’n  opgave  staat  is  Waalhavens  (zie  kaartjes   hieronder).         Figuur  1:  Projectgebied  Waalhavens  in  haar  stedelijke  context  
  16. 16. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  16       Figuur  2:  Stedenbouwkundig  plan  (Oranje  =  wonen  ,  blauw  =  werken,  rood  =  horeca).     De  gemeente  Rotterdam  heeft  in  samenwerking  met  het  Havenbedrijf  Rotterdam  ambitieuze   plannen  geformuleerd  voor  dit  gebied  dat  voornamelijk  bestaat  uit  twee  oude  havenarmen.   Het  gebied  moet  een  toplocatie  worden  voor  de  kenniseconomie,  waar  toonaangevende   bedrijven  zich  willen  vestigen  en  een  leefomgeving  bieden  waar  hoogopgeleide   tweeverdieners  willen  wonen.  Daarnaast  moet  het  de  meest  duurzame  stedelijke   ontwikkelingslocatie  van  Nederland  worden  en  voldoen  aan  eisen  aan  de  milieukwaliteit.     Zoals  dat  gaat,  zorgen  de  beperkingen  die  het  gebied  kent  ervoor  dat  deze  bestuurlijke   ambities  niet  eenvoudig  te  realiseren  zijn.  Het  is  aan  jullie  team  om  hier  een  zo  goed  mogelijke   oplossing  voor  te  ontwerpen  die  tegemoet  komt  aan  het  spanningsveld  tussen  ambities  en   realiteit!  Het  uitgangspunt  daarbij  is  een  voorlopig  ontwerp  dat  gemaakt  is  door  een   onafhankelijk  stedenbouwkundig  bureau  (figuur  2).  In  deze  fase  van  het  planproces  gaat  het   vooral  om  de  structuur,  de  plaatsing  van  de  woon-­‐  en  werkfunctie  in  het  gebied  en  de   argumentatie  daarbij.     Je  hebt  in  totaal  precies  60  minuten  om  met  je  team  tot  een  verbeterd  plan  te  komen  (dit   lever  je  in  met  1  kaart  plus  tekst).  Zorg  dus  dat  je  dit  goed  organiseert!  Je  plan  wordt   uiteindelijk  beoordeeld  op  een  aantal  factoren,  zoals  haalbaarheid  (financieel  en  binnen   milienormen),  innovativiteit  en  concreetheid.  De  winnaar  krijgt  een  TNO  prijzenpakket.              
  17. 17. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  17     APPENDIX  II:  EVALUATION  FORM  FOR  QUALITY  OF  THE  PROCES   Ik#heb#een#goed#gevoel#over#de#sessie De#sessie#heeft#geresulteerd#in#bruikbare#resultaten Ik#was#goed#in#staat#mijn#mijn#rol#uit#te#voeren De#onderwerpen#die#vanuit#mijn#rol#van#belang#zijn,#zijn#tijdens# de#sessie#goed#naar#voren#gekomen Ik#heb#vanuit#mijn#rol#interventies#kunnen#inbrengen#in#het# plan De#sessie#was#succesvol Ik#ben#tevreden#met#de#sessie Ik#heb#er#vertrouwen#in#dat#de#uitkomst#goed#is De#andere#deelnemers#zijn#tevreden#met#de#sessie Het#resultaat#biedt#een#echte#oplossing#voor#het#probleem Het#resultaat#van#de#sessie#is#gebaseerd#op#correcte#aannames# over#het#stedelijk#systeem Mijn#inzicht#in#het#probleem#is#vergroot De#sessie#heeft#mijn#inzicht#in#de#relatie#tussen#de#verschillende# elementen#van#het#probleem#vergroot Het#is#duidelijk#voor#mij#wat#de#oorzaken#van#het#probleem#zijn Ik#heb#nu#meer#inzicht#in#de#processen#die#een#rol#spelen#in#het# probleem Jullie#groepsnummer Je#studentnummer: Hoeveel#tijd#hebben#jullie#gebruikt: Welke#rol#vervulde#je? MK:$ MK:externe$ MK: Stedenbouw0 Verkeers0 Plan0 lucht veiligheid Geluid kundige kundige econoom NVT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Zeer$mee eens Jullie#groepsnummer Je#studentnummer: Hoeveel#tijd#hebben#jullie#gebruikt: Welke#rol#vervulde#je? Zeer$mee oneens De#sessie#heeft#geleid#tot#nieuwe#inzichten Mijn#begrip#van#de#meningen#van#andere#deelnemers#over#het# probleem#is#toegenomen Ik#begrijp#nu#hoe#andere#deelnemers#het#probleem#zien De#andere#deelnemers#begrijpen#beter#hoe#ik#het#probleem#zie Ik#begrijp#nu#de#voorgestelde#oplossingen#van#de#andere# deelnemers#beter Ik#ondersteun#de#meeste#resultaten#van#de#sessie Het#proces#heeft#me#inzicht#gegeven#in#de#meningen#en#ideeen# van#anderen#over#het#probleem We#hebben#tijdens#de#sessie#een#gemeenschappelijke# professionele#taal#ontwikkeld Z.O.Z. Z.O.Z. Z.O.Z.  
  18. 18. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  18     Tijdens(de(sessie(ontstond(een(platform(die(het(delen(van( ideeen(ondersteunde We(hebben(een(gemeenschappelijke(visie(over(het(probleem( bereikt De(resultaten(zijn(een(integratie(van(diverse(meningen(en( ideeen(van(de(deelnemers We(waren(in(staat(consensus(over(het(probleem(te( ontwikkelen We(hebben(een(gedeelde(visie(over(strategische(doelen(bereikt We(hebben(een(gedeelde(visie(over(mogelijke(oplossingen( bereikt Ik(had(een(sterk(groepsgevoel(tijdens(de(sessie De(sessie(bracht(me(dichter(bij(de(andere(deelnemers Er(was(sprake(van(conflict(tijdens(de(sessie Er(was(conflict(over(de(uit(te(voeren(taak We(hebben(de(tijd(efficient(benut Heb(je(nog(andere(opmerkingen(over(de(sessie? NVT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Zeer.mee oneens Zeer.mee eens  
  19. 19. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  19     APPENDIX  III:  EVALUATION  FORM  FOR  QUALITY  OF  THE  OUTCOME   Geef a.u.b. het nummer van de strategie aan: NVT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 De  strategie  is  ingenieus De  strategie  is  fantasierijk De  strategie  is  verrassend De  strategie  is  vernieuwend De  strategie  is  radicaal De  strategie  heeft  een  transformerende  potentie De  strategie  is  eenvoudig  te  implementeren De  strategie  is  sociaal  acceptabel De  strategie  is  juridisch  acceptabel De  strategie  is  politiek  acceptabel De  strategie  heeft  een  duidelijk  verband  met  het  probleem De  strategie  zal  het  probleem  oplossen Dit  is  een  effectieve  strategie De  strategie  kan  worden  opgedeeld  in  verschillende  componenten De  strategie  gaat  in  op  "wie" De  strategie  gaat  in  op  "wat" De  strategie  gaat  in  op  "waar" De  strategie  gaat  in  op  "wanneer" De  strategie  gaat  in  op  "waarom" De  strategie  gaat  in  op  "hoe" Er  is  een  duidelijke  relatie  tussen  voorgestelde  acties  &  verwachte  uitkomsten de  strategie  wordt  duidelijk  gecommuniceerd De  strategie  is  makkelijk  te  begrijpen De  strategie  sluit  aan  op  stedelijke  dynamiek Heeft  u  nog  verdere  opmerkingen  over  deze  strategie? Zeer mee oneens Zeer mee eens  
  20. 20. CESAR  Working  Document  Series  no.  6     Urban  Strategy  to  support  group  learning   Page  20     APPENDIX  IV:  EVALUATION  FORM  FOR  USABILITY  OF  URBAN  STRATEGY   Je Studentennummer Welke indicatoren hebben jullie vooral gebruikt? N.A. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Urban  strategy  is  transparant  voor  mij De  communicatieve  waarde  van  de  output  is  hoog De  output  wordt  duidelijk  weergegeven Urban  Strategy  is  gebruiksvriendelijk De  Output  is  geloofwaardig Urban  Strategy  is  uitgebreid  genoeg De  focus  van  Urban  Strategy Het  detailniveau  van  de  kaarten  is  voldoende Urban  Strategy  is  makkelijk  te  begrijpen Het  instrument  faciliteerde  het  evalueren  van   alternatieven Het  instrument  faciliteerde  het  creeren  van  ideeen Het  instrument  ondersteunde  het  schetsen  van  ideeen Ik  begrijp  wat  er  (niet)  wordt  meegenomen  in  de   indicatoren Door  Urban  Strategy  waren  we  in  staat  om  het  werk  te   doen  met  minder  inzet Door  Urban  Strategy  waren  we  in  staat    om  het  werk   te  doen  in  minder  tijd Door  urban  Strategy  waren  we  in  staat  om  meer  te   doen  in  minder  tijd Heeft  U  nog  andere  opmerkingen  over  urban  Strategy Sterk mee oneens Sterk mee eens  

×