Holistic approach to regionalism

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Holistic approach to regionalism

  1. 1. Holistic Approaches to aSustainable Regionalism Mark BroylesHuttonArchitectureStudio
  2. 2. regionalism: an architecture that is an inseparable part of its ecosystem
  3. 3. regionalism:peopleare an inseparable partof theirecosystem
  4. 4. but today, most buildings separate us fromthe ecosystem around us. on purpose.
  5. 5. we have become very good at creatingand sustaining artificial climates and environments.
  6. 6. so a lot of our efforts at sustainability involve making our artificial.... separated..... environments simply moreefficient.
  7. 7. regionalism starts with the region. (Latin regere, to rule)
  8. 8. and the regionis made up of a particular climate geology ecosystem which form the natural resources fora regional human culture.
  9. 9. however…the regional environment has progressively less to dowith the response of our building culture 1850 1910 2000
  10. 10. regionalism starts with the region.any building is a regionalist building if it creates an intimate,ongoing relationship between inhabitant and the surrounding regional environment
  11. 11. regional architecturedoesn’t mean looking log cabin but behaving lunar module.
  12. 12. so where do we begin? our buildings should leverage their environment, not resist it.The Queen’s Building, DeMontfort University, Short/Ford Architects
  13. 13. but- to leverage their environment, our buildings-and the spaces they enclose- must have sufficient interaction with that environment. this interaction should happen at the interface surface- the envelope.
  14. 14. a key to successfully leveraging the environment is the rediscovery ofradiant heat transfer. Thermally Active Surfaces in Architecture Kiel Moe
  15. 15. &So How Did We Get Here?Electric Light Air Conditioning Prime Movers behind our design culture
  16. 16. electric light revolutionizes building depths
  17. 17. air conditioning enables artificial climate!!
  18. 18. current (regional) building culture: (a recipe) 1. accept universal program. 2. design complex conditioning system.3. don’t forget to use air as thermal storage and transfer medium. 4. make envelope as resistant to heat transfer as possible. 5. don’t forget to hire someone really smart to operate it. 6. put some pitched roofs and logs on the outside.
  19. 19. sustainable (regional) building culture: 1. accept adapt universal program. 2. design complex simple conditioning system.3. don’t forget to use air as thermal storage and transfer medium. 4. make envelope as resistant to all about heat transfer.5. don’t forget to need to hire someone really smart to operate it.6. go ahead and put some pitched roofs and logs on the outside.
  20. 20. sustainable regional building culture: 1. accept adapt universal program. If the way we live and work in buildings is related to the outside climate and environment, the basic architectural program should reflect this. An office building in New York should be different than an office building in Denver.
  21. 21. Architectural Programs have two bad habits: 1. Turning Into Architecture. 2. Turning Into Architecture.
  22. 22. architectural programs can too readily drive architectural form.....
  23. 23. make no mistake- sustainabledesign success can’t be dependenton 60-year-old program expectations. we will fail to green the built world if we continue to accept this.
  24. 24. sustainable regional building culture: 2. design complex simple conditioning system. complex conditioning systems arise when we ask too much of the architectural program and too little of the architectural fabric.
  25. 25. sustainable regional building culture:3. don’t forget to use air as thermal storage and transfer medium. water is 832 times as dense as air, using up far less space to move and store the same amount of energy.
  26. 26. sustainable regional building culture: 4. make envelope resistant to all about heat transfer.envelope as skin: an organic concept that allows for ventilation and thermal mediation to occur more passively and constantly
  27. 27. sustainable regional building culture:5. don’t forget to need to hire someone really smart to operate it. Thermal performance too dependent on high levels of maintenance and active control is probably doomed to fall short of expectations.
  28. 28. Terry Thomas Building Weber Thompson Architects, Seattlesustainable regional building culture:6. go ahead and put some pitched roofs and logs on the outside. A robust regional approach to building has very little to do with nostalgic aesthetics.
  29. 29. a new concept of organic architecture: buildings as organisms trees: a biological model for architecturethe imperative of shaped and oriented surface area for interchange the critical relationship of surface area to interior volume
  30. 30. a critical building task: separate ventilation (breathing) from thermal comfort (regulation)Buildings should function as environmental and climatic mediators, not as barriers.
  31. 31. a critical building task:separate ventilation (breathing) from thermal comfort (regulation)
  32. 32. To create regional architecture, we want to break the habit of cocooning buildings and occupants.Our main reason to be designing in this way has been to optimize the use of air as our thermal transfer and storage medium.
  33. 33. If we can break the link between thermal comfort and ventilation (which became associated with the advent of air conditioning) we can begin to reinvent the relationship between architecture and environmental comfort.
  34. 34. A key to making this separation of thermal comfort and ventilation successful lies in the rediscovery of radiant heat transfer and high-mass media for thermal storage and transfer.
  35. 35. Proper radiant heat transfer control and manipulation can allow people to feelcomfortable within a much wider range of air temperatures than is possible with reliance only on convection and conduction.
  36. 36. When air temperatures don’t need to be micromanaged- the level of complexity of air handling systems can be reduced drastically.Thermally Active Surfaces in Architecture Kiel Moe
  37. 37. Roofing 1% Exterior Closure 11% And we can begin to Substructure Superstructure 16% Refocus 2% the design effortFoundation and budget 6% Mechanical on Sitework 35% 2%Equipment architecture-as- 3% organism General Conditions Electrical 10% vs. 9% building-as- Conveying Systems 3% machine Thermally Active Surfaces in Architecture Kiel Moe
  38. 38. Substructure Foundation 7% 7% Sitework 2% Equipment And we can begin to 3%General Conditions Refocus 8% the design effort Superstructure 27% and budgetConveying Systems 3% on Electrical 9% architecture-as- organism Mechanical 18% Exterior Closure vs. 14% building-as- machine Roofing Thermally Active Surfaces in Architecture Kiel Moe 1%
  39. 39. So What ARE the critical steps?
  40. 40. Step One.Make program needs function well in shallow-plate buildings.
  41. 41. Step One. Deep buildings- like deep organisms-require more complexity and specialization. Complex Interchange Zone Easy Interchange Zone
  42. 42. Step One.Shallow plate buildings enhance the relationship between occupant, sun, and mass storage.
  43. 43. Step One. Vs.Make program needs function well in shallow-plate buildings.
  44. 44. Step One.Make program needs function well in shallow-plate buildings.
  45. 45. Step Two. Orient all of the building parts properly with respect to the sunregardless of the site shape or orientation.
  46. 46. Step Three.Couple the building to the earth when possible.
  47. 47. Step Three.Earth coupling- even subtle- can pay dividends.
  48. 48. Step Four.Make shallow-plate buildingsout of high-mass materials. Alys Beach Mixed Use DeveopmentMerrill Pastor Coghlan Architects
  49. 49. Step Five.Augment thermal high-mass building performancewith active-radiant heat transfer system. NREL Research Support Facility RNL Architects
  50. 50. Step Six. Summer: Radiant barriers reflect radiant energy, prevent surfaces from heating up Interior mass moderates interior temperature swings Ground coupling engages earth as heat sink Design and managethe architectural radiant environment.
  51. 51. Step Six. Winter: Radiant barriers reflect interior radiant energy, prevent cold-sky radiation Interior mass stores heat energy from solar gain, building loads, and heating system Ground coupling engages earth as heat source, diurnal swing moderator Design and managethe architectural radiant environment.
  52. 52. Holistic regional design:a culture of small buildings
  53. 53. 3-4 story city:architecture itself asinfrastructureSmaller buildingsare betterbuilding blocks forgood cities
  54. 54. A Question of Balance:cities of mostly low, high-mass buildings... with a FEW tall buildings and a FEW deep-plate buildings
  55. 55. Holistic regional design: a culture of small buildingsWalmart Today Walmart Future
  56. 56. Holistic regional design:a culture of small buildings
  57. 57. Holistic regional design:a culture of small buildings
  58. 58. Holistic regional design:buildings made of the soil and stone underfoot
  59. 59. Holistic regional design:a culture of breathing buildings
  60. 60. Artificial climates and sealed buildings disconnect us from stewardship of the ‘outdoors’ Hmmmmmm...... Lovely Artificial Lovely Artificial Lovely Artificial Climate Climates Climate
  61. 61. Holistic regional design:a culture of radiant buildings
  62. 62. Holistic regional design:a culture of organic buildings
  63. 63. Holistic regional design:Sources and Required Reading

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