HITD 201: Design Thinking Lecture 1 - Introduction
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HITD 201: Design Thinking Lecture 1 - Introduction

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Introductory lecture on Design Thinking given by Mark Billinghurst as part of the HITD 201 course taught at the University of Canterbury. Taught on December 9th 2013

Introductory lecture on Design Thinking given by Mark Billinghurst as part of the HITD 201 course taught at the University of Canterbury. Taught on December 9th 2013

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HITD 201: Design Thinking Lecture 1 - Introduction HITD 201: Design Thinking Lecture 1 - Introduction Presentation Transcript

  • HITD 201 Introduction to Design Thinking Mark Billinghurst HIT Lab NZ December 9th 2013
  • Mark   PhD Electrical Engineering   University of Washington   Interaction Design   Museum experiences, Tools   Augmented Reality   Mobile AR, Evaluation, Multimodal   Collaboration   Enhanced FtF and remote collaboration
  • Introduction View slide
  • What to Do?   Imagine   You re bringing a new product to market   Your #2 competitor has been in the market for over a year, selling millions of units   Your #1 competitor launches the same month   Your technology is slower than your competitors   Your technology is older than your competitors   Your last product failed in the market View slide
  •  Do you compete on Price ?  Do you compete on Technology ?  Do you compete on Features ? Compete on user experience !
  • Nintendo Wii   Cheap - $500   Unique game play/Design   Wireless 3 DOF controller   Position and orientation sensing   Aiming to broaden user base   Can play previous games/downloads
  • Sales to Sept 2011
  • “The product is no longer the basis of value. The experience is.” Venkat Ramaswamy The Future of Competition.
  • Using the N-gage
  • SideTalking   www.sidetalkin.com
  • Design Thinking A problem solving methodology that helps students and innovators to approach today’s problems from a new perspective.
  • “Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws from the designer's toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success.” —Tim Brown, president and CEO, IDEO
  • Design Thinking Mindset   Focus on human values   Show don’t tell   Craft clarity   Embrace experimentation   Be mindful of process   Bias towards action   Radical collaboration
  • History
  • History of Design Thinking   1969 Herbert Simon – The Science of the Artificial   Design as a way of thinking   1973 Robert Kim - Experiences In Visual Thinking   Design Engineering   1980’s Rolf Faste -Stanford Univ.   Design Education, HCD   1991 Deflt University   First Academic Research Symposium   1991 Founding of IDEO   2004 Stanford d.school founded
  • IDEO (http://www.ideo.com/)   International Design Innovation firm   Founded 1991   Major advocate of Design Thinking   Multidisciplinary staff   Human factors, engineering, design, communications   Major Projects   Apple mouse, Palm V, Leap chair, etc
  • Stanford d.school   Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design   http://dschool.stanford.edu/
  • Design Thinking Process
  • Design Thinking Process 5 modes iterated through
  • Empathize   Empathy: Foundation of Human-Centered Design Process   Observe; Users and their behaviour in context   Engage: Interact with and interview users   Immerse: Experience what users experience
  • Why Empathize   Need to understand end users   You’re solving their problems   Watching people what people do   Understand what they think and feel   Engage to uncover unexpected insights   Uncover needs – conscious and unconscious   Guide innovation efforts   Identify right users to design for
  • Understanding the User A day in the Life of.. Cultural Probes.. Role Playing..
  • Cultural Probes: Equator Domestic Probes
  • Interviewing   Understanding people’s thoughts, emotions, motivations   Understanding people’s choices and behaviours   Key way to identify needs
  • Interview Process
  • Consider the Whole User
  • Define   Expresses the problem you are addressing   Defines your unique point of view   Unique design vision based on Empathy outcomes   Two Goals   Deep understanding of users and design space   Actionable problem statement (point of view)
  • Expressing the Problem [User] needs [verb phrase] in a way that [way] How might we [verb phrase] ?
  • Tools for Problem Definition   Storytelling   Personas   Clustering   Task Flow Analysis   Frameworks   Empathy Maps
  • Personas •  Personas are a design tool to help visualize who you are designing for and imagine how person will use the product •  A persona is an archetype that represents the behavior and goals of a group of users •  Based on insights and observations from customer research •  Not real people, but synthesised from real user characteristics •  Bring them to life with a name, characteristics, goals, background •  Develop multiple personas
  • Empathy Map
  • Problem Definition Creates Insight User + Need = Insight
  • How Might We … ?   Short questions that launch brainstorming
  • Good Point of View   Inspires your team   Provides focus and frames the problem   Provides a reference for evaluating ideas   Fuels brainstorming by suggesting ‘how might we’   Captures the hearts and minds of people   Guides your innovation efforts
  • Ideate   Idea generation   Large quantity of diverse ideas   Motivation   Step beyond obvious solutions   Harness collective perspectives   Uncover unexpected areas of exploration   Create fluency (volume) and flexibility (variety)   Move beyond obvious solutions
  • Ideation Tools   Brainstorming   Be visual, defer judgment, quantity not quality   Mindmaps   Look at existing solutions   Post-it note clouds
  • Brainstorming   Best with interdisciplinary team
  • MindMapping
  • Other Products in Market   Notice all the iPod look-alikes?
  • Prototype   Create physical form of ideas   Allow people to experience and interact with them   Why Prototype?   Empathy gaining- deepen understanding of design space   Exploration – build to think   Testing – test solutions with end users   Inspiration – help others catch your vision
  • Prototyping Tools   Sketching   Physical Mockups   Wireframes   Interaction Flows   Storyboards   Acting   Preotyping
  • Sketching
  • Wireframes
  • Storyboarding www.id-book.com 52
  • Physical Prototype
  • Acting/Role Playing
  • Goals of Prototyping   Learn   Solve Disagreements   Reduce miscommunication   Start a conversation   Fail quickly and cheaply   Test ideas without spending time and money   Manage the solution building process   Break large problem into smaller testable parts
  • Test   Place prototypes into context of use   Prototype and if you know you’re right, Test as if you know you’re wrong   Why Test   Refine prototype and solutions   Learn more about the user   Refine our POV
  • Types of Testing   ‘quick and dirty’   Focus Group   Usability testing   Field studies   Predictive evaluation
  • Design Thinking Flow
  • Three Phase Model
  • Process Flow Problem Space Solution Space
  • Elaboration and Reduction   Elaborate - generate solutions. These are the opportunities   Reduce - decide on the ones worth pursuing   Repeat - elaborate and reduce again on those solutions Source: Laseau,P. (1980) Graphic Thinking for Architects & Designers. John Wiley and Sons
  • Focus and Flare Design is a convergent and divergent process
  • The Design Funnel   Alternate generation of ideas and convergence until resolution Modified from Pugh, S. (1990) Total design: Integrated methods for successful products engineering. Addison-Wesley. P. 75
  • Assignment One   Write a one page reflection on the following:   1. What does Design Thinking mean to me?   2. What you hope to get out of the class   3. How you imagine Design Thinking will help you achieve your goals?