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How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
How did the rise of the shoguns change  society
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How did the rise of the shoguns change society

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I have modified others people slides and used information from a number of sources. I do not have the rights to the photos and the content is from varying sources. …

I have modified others people slides and used information from a number of sources. I do not have the rights to the photos and the content is from varying sources.
A main source was Oxford big ideas history 8, an amazing source.

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  • Genpai war – the defeat of the Taira clan
  • HIERARCHY IN FEUDAL JAPANSociety was divided into two classes in Feudal Japan, the nobility and the peasants. The noble class made up roughly twelve percent of the population with peasants making up the rest.Emperor and ShogunThe Emperor and the Shogun were the highest ranking nobles. During Japan's feudal period the Shogun held the most power while the Emperor was more of a puppet figure with little actual power. As the Shogun was a military leader his sword, or Nihonto in Japanese (katana came later in the Mid-Muromachi period), was an important part of his attire.DaimyoDaimyo were powerful warlords and the most powerful rulers under the Shogun from the 10th century to the early 19th century. Within their province the Daimyo had complete military and economic power. Daimyo had vast hereditary land holdings and armies to protect the land and its workers. The most powerful warlords sometimes achieved the status of Shogun.SamuraiThe Daimyo armies were made up of Samurai warriors. Samurai worked under Daimyo, but they had additional privileges and held a higher social status than common people. These privileges included being able to have a surname, a family crest, and carry two swords. People with Samurai family names are still treated with great respect in Japan today. Although most samurai were not well educated, they had a strict code of honor or the "way of the warrior", known as bushido in Japanese. If a Samurai broke the bushido code and brought dishonor to him/herself they would be expected to commit seppuku, or ritual suicide. Women were allowed to serve as samurai but always served under a male leader.PeasantsPeasants were divided into several sub-classes. The highest ranking of the peasants were farmers. Farmers who owned their own land ranked higher than farmers who did not. Craftsmen, or artisans, were the second highest ranking after the farmers. They worked with wood and metal and some became well-known as expert Samura sword makers. Merchants were the lowest ranking because it was felt they made their living off of other people's work. However, in later times when Japan began to use money more as currency merchants became more wealthy.
  • Read the letter from Kublai Khan the grandson of Ghenghis Khan
  • Read the letter from Kublai Khan the grandson of Ghenghis Khan
  • Transcript

    • 1. Medieval JapanYear 8 History
    • 2.  Introduction The rise of the Shogun Feudal System The Mongol invasions Castles and Towns
    • 3. In time, the imperial court of Japan’s emperor became too big to manage. As a result, some government officials were released from their obligations to the emperor. Some of them went on to become managers of Japan’s various provinces. They sold the crops they grew, and collected taxes; many became wealthy and powerful people.New clans formed around these ruling families, and conflicts broke out among them. These civil wars would see the rise of shoguns that would go on to control Japan.
    • 4.  Civil war between various clans was common The clans Minamoto and Taira were the most important clans at the emperors court.In 1185 – Minamoto no Yoritomo formed a military government at Kamakura , known as Kamakura bakufu (a tent government)  Was meant to be temporary
    • 5. In 1192 –Yorimoto asked the imperial court to recognise his position with the title: Seii Tai-shogun ( commander in chief for the suppression of barbarians) Emperor would keep his position and receive protection from the shogun Shogun now spoke for the Emperor and nobles had to obey him. This was the start of the Kamakura Shogunate (1192 – 1199)
    • 6.  Japan had to unite to fight the common enemy. They knew where the Mongols would land
    • 7. Two main attacks1. 1274  23 000 soldiers  800 ships2. 1281  140 000 Soldiers  4000 shipsThe victory of both battles led to civil war.
    • 8.  After the Mongol invasion Emperor Go-Daigo was able to gain the support of the Samurai and overthrow the Kamakura Shogunate Civil war continued until 1603 when the emperor gave Tokugawa the shogun position. The family would remain in power until 1868.
    • 9.  Feudalism became strengthened The daimyo was allowed to rule domains in return for providing the shogun support.  Shogun controlled a quarter of the land  Three quarters divided into domains ruled by 275 daimyo A wealthy daimyo with his samurai posed a threat to the shogun, so the shogun placed restrictions on the daimyo.
    • 10.  Made from wood High walls To show the wealth and power of the daimyo Surrounded by the homes of daimyo Slots to fire arrows Surrounded by moats, walls and gates

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