Exploring the landscape<br />Early childhood Research, opinion, evaluations, trends<br />MAY 2011<br />Prepared for the <b...
Alberta families<br /><ul><li>180,000  families with children 0 to 6
Alberta the youngest province. One in five Albertans are under 15. (745,000)
280,000 + kids, five and under: 7.5% of the population.
1 in 7 children lives in a lone-parent family. </li></ul>Muttart Foundation, November 2010, In the Best Interest of Childr...
POVERTY<br />The rate of poverty in Alberta has been declining. <br />For all families, decreased from 14.9% in 1996 to 8....
A newcomer to Canada
Disabled
A Single Parent family
Single
Young</li></ul>Various sources.<br />Faid, P. 2009, Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs, Extending the Alberta Advanta...
Poverty in edmonton<br /><ul><li>120,000 people living in poverty in Edmonton CMA
Child poverty rate: Metro 12.5% / Edmonton 16.5%
40% of kids in lone parent families
40% of Aboriginal families
40% of Newcomers
The median income of Aboriginal citizens is approximately 30% less than Non Aboriginal citizens.</li></ul>Edmonton Social ...
Percentage visible minorities for Canada, provinces and territories, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses <br />INCREASING DIVERSI...
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Exploring the Landscape

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Strategic Overview of the early childhood development/learning landscape in Alberta and Edmonton, prepared for the Head Start Action Learning Project (Edmonton) Pre-Retreat, May 24 2011, Edmonton.

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  • The Edmonton newcomer population grew by 14.9 % between 2001 and 2006, (10.6 % was the city’s growth; national rate was 13.6%)
  • Ensure that health practitioners, social services staff and providers of employee assistance services are trained to identify at-risk mothers-tobe/new parents, and know how to get them the help they need – including support for dealing with addictions during pregnancy, coaching on parenting, nutrition programs and pre-school learning opportunities for the children.
  • Exploring the Landscape

    1. 1. Exploring the landscape<br />Early childhood Research, opinion, evaluations, trends<br />MAY 2011<br />Prepared for the <br />Head Start Action Learning Project<br />Facilitators:<br />Mark Holmgren & Mark Cabaj<br />1<br />
    2. 2. Alberta families<br /><ul><li>180,000 families with children 0 to 6
    3. 3. Alberta the youngest province. One in five Albertans are under 15. (745,000)
    4. 4. 280,000 + kids, five and under: 7.5% of the population.
    5. 5. 1 in 7 children lives in a lone-parent family. </li></ul>Muttart Foundation, November 2010, In the Best Interest of Children and Families: A discussion of Early Childhood Education and Care.<br />2<br />
    6. 6. POVERTY<br />The rate of poverty in Alberta has been declining. <br />For all families, decreased from 14.9% in 1996 to 8.7% in 2006.<br />For lone-parent families with children under 18, the incidence of poverty has fallen from 39.1% in 2001 to 24.7% in 2006.<br />One is significantly more likely to be poor if one is:<br /><ul><li>Aboriginal
    7. 7. A newcomer to Canada
    8. 8. Disabled
    9. 9. A Single Parent family
    10. 10. Single
    11. 11. Young</li></ul>Various sources.<br />Faid, P. 2009, Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs, Extending the Alberta Advantage, Canadian Council on Social Development.<br />3<br />
    12. 12. Poverty in edmonton<br /><ul><li>120,000 people living in poverty in Edmonton CMA
    13. 13. Child poverty rate: Metro 12.5% / Edmonton 16.5%
    14. 14. 40% of kids in lone parent families
    15. 15. 40% of Aboriginal families
    16. 16. 40% of Newcomers
    17. 17. The median income of Aboriginal citizens is approximately 30% less than Non Aboriginal citizens.</li></ul>Edmonton Social Planning Council reporting on 2006 Stats Canada Census data; retrieved February 4, 2011 from http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/content/view/431/255/ <br />The Income Gap Between Aboriginal Peoples and the Rest of Canada, Daniel Wilson and David Macdonald. April 2010.Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.<br />4<br />
    18. 18. Percentage visible minorities for Canada, provinces and territories, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses <br />INCREASING DIVERSITY<br />http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/92-596/P2-2.cfm?Lang=eng&T=CMA&S=0&O=A&LINE_ID=901&TOPIC_ID=100&start=1&end=144&disp=144<br />6% of Albertans are Aboriginal.<br />33% of the Aboriginal population is under 15.<br />ABORIGINAL PEOPLE<br />5<br />
    19. 19. Changes past and future<br /><ul><li>Mom’s not at home. Less family time. More latchkey kids.
    20. 20. More kids with disabilities or delays in the system.
    21. 21. Attention to ECD seen as an economic driver.
    22. 22. Families that don’t fit LICO criteria but are still poor and disadvantaged are not getting help.
    23. 23. Non-English speaking children from various cultures.
    24. 24. Economy increasingly dependent on immigration.</li></ul>6<br />
    25. 25. Funding & delivery schematic<br />Muttart Foundation, November 2010, In the Best Interest of Children and Families: A discussion of Early Childhood Education and Care<br />7<br />
    26. 26. WHAT’S GOING ON?<br />HIGHLIGHTS<br />Increased interest, understanding of public and policy makers.<br />More money but infrastructure dollars hard to come by.<br />Complex system with many players and ample administration.<br />Disconnected mandates and services and inequitable access to services/supports<br />No single Ministry is responsible, but three are starting to work together.<br />8<br />
    27. 27. <ul><li>Education now funding 2 ½ year olds with special needs (PUF funding).
    28. 28. Both school boards have opened sites for 4 year olds with language needs.
    29. 29. Health looking into 0-3 universal screening.
    30. 30. EC Mapping – putting information in the hands of communities.
    31. 31. Aligning the Early Years & Early Years Continuum Project
    32. 32. Success By 6 – education and advocacy</li></ul>What’s going on around us<br />9<br />
    33. 33. From Premier’s Council for Economic Strategy, Shaping Alberta’s Future.<br />“To secure our future prosperity, we must:<br />Intensify efforts to make the early childhood development support system in Alberta more cohesive and coordinated – reducing overlaps and filling gaps – with a special focus on children who are most at risk” (page 58).<br />Report calls for “accelerat[ing] action on ensuring [Aboriginal] young people achieve parity of educational outcomes with non-Aboriginals” (page 58).<br />10<br />
    34. 34. From Premier’s Council for Economic Strategy, Shaping Alberta’s Future.<br />Establish an interdisciplinary social policy with maternal health/early childhood development as its starting point.<br />Increase and diversify training for health practitioners, social services staff, etc.<br />Expand public education<br />on the importance of the first six years to a child’s future.<br />Work with community to determine how to make the most effective use of resources to deliver priority outcomes<br />Page 60<br />11<br />
    35. 35. FROM INSPIRING ACTION ON EDUCATION (ALBERTA GOV’T)<br />“A Coordinated Approach to Early Learning <br />Early childhood experiences impact future learning, health, and well being. A coordinated approach to early learning is a provincial approach where communities work together to support children and families through access to high quality and inclusive learning across a range of early childhood settings.“<br />12<br />
    36. 36. FROM INSPIRING ACTION ON EDUCATION (ALBERTA GOV’T)<br />A Coordinated Approach to Early Learning : What it means<br />A coordinated approach to early learning means that: <br /><ul><li>from birth, all children have opportunities to experience and benefit from quality early learning experiences ….
    37. 37. quality early learning educational opportunities …are incorporated into academic programs at the elementary level.
    38. 38. families will have knowledge and resources along a continuum of supports and services to help children achieve their potential.
    39. 39. communities have the capacity and resources to effectively support early childhood development and there is support for the transition from home to school.</li></ul>13<br />
    40. 40. Head start impact study<br />The study quantifies the overall impact of Head Start separately for 3- and 4-year-old children in four key program domains<br /><ul><li>cognitive development,
    41. 41. social-emotional development,
    42. 42. health status and services, and
    43. 43. parenting practices. </li></ul>These impacts are quantified by examining the difference in outcomes between children assigned to the Head Start group and those assigned to the control group.<br />14<br />
    44. 44. KEY FINDINGSSource: National Head Start Association (US)<br />The key finding of the Head Start Impact Study shows that Head Start works. The study authors state, <br />“Providing access to Head Start has a positive impact on children’s preschool experiences. There are statistically significant differences between the Head Start group and the control group on every measure of children’s preschool experiences measured in this study.”<br />The Head Start children outperformed the control group in every domain that the study measured, including positive cognitive, social-emotional, health and parenting impacts. The Head Start children left Head Start more ready for school than their peers in the control group.<br />15<br />
    45. 45. KEY FINDINGSSource: National Head Start Association (US)<br />However, the study goes on to show that, by the end of first grade, the Head Start children lost many of the advantages they had when they began kindergarten. <br />16<br />
    46. 46. Local evaluation the Edmonton head start project<br />This study/evaluation’s conclusions about impact on families according to families:<br />• Teaches me how to help my child develop and learn.<br />• Enables my child to be ready for kindergarten.<br />• Helps to connect my child with professional services (e.g. health team, speech & language) to strengthen his or her development.<br />• Helps me with my parenting.<br />• Helps me to solve problems and plan for the future.<br />• Helps me to make new friends and connections in the community.<br />• Help me to connect with other community services (e.g., food bank) and health care (doctors, health clinics).<br />17<br />
    47. 47. Major sources<br />Muttart Foundation, November 2010, In the Best Interest of Children and Families: A discussion of Early Childhood Education and Care.<br />Faid, P. 2009, Poverty Reduction Policies and Programs, Extending the Alberta Advantage, Canadian Council on Social Development.<br />Alberta Government, 2011, Report of the Premier’s Council for Economic Strategy, Shaping Alberta’s Future.<br />U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 2010, Head Start Impact Study Final Report, Executive Summary.<br />National Head Start Association (US), 2010, Head Start Impact Study – What Does It Say, What Does It Mean?<br />Government of Alberta, 2010, Inspiring Action on Education.<br />Edmonton Social Planning Council reporting on 2006 Stats Canada Census data; retrieved February 4, 2011 from http://www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca/content/view/431/255/ <br />The Income Gap Between Aboriginal Peoples and the Rest of Canada, Daniel Wilson and David Macdonald. April 2010.Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.<br />Interviews with Gail Campbell, Sue Lynch, Gloria Chalmers.<br />18<br />
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