Community Broadband     Planning Workshop     Tuesday, November 13, 2012 (Final)       Moderated by Mark Goldstein, Presid...
Community Broadband Workshop OverviewA primary strategy of the Digital Arizona Program (DAP) is toprovide funding, technic...
Community Broadband Workshop PresentersMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center andSecretary, Arizona Tele...
Section 1: Community BroadbandEngagement Background & ProcessesMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center an...
Connect and CommunicateSource: International Research Center (http://www.researchedge.com/)
Modern Home Network ExampleSource: International Research Center (http://www.researchedge.com/)
Source: Intel Corporation 2012
Evolution of Computer Power/CostSource: Hans Moravec, Artificial Intelligence Pioneer 2009AKA Raymond Kurzweil’s Singulari...
The Internet of Thingshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_Things
Mobile Data Traffic Forecast for North America in 2016•In North America, mobile data traffic will grow 17-fold from 2011 t...
Communications Spectrum Supply and Demand
Phone Modem, DSL, T1/T3 over Copper Technology             Basics                    Pros                  ConsPhone Modem...
Cable Modem, Fiber Optics, FSO Technology         Basics                    Pros                   ConsCable Modem    Cabl...
Cellular, Wi-Fi, WiMAX Wireless Technology           Basics                   Pros                  ConsCellular         T...
Satellite, Bluetooth, Zigbee, UWB, BPL Technology           Basics                    Pros                   ConsSatellite...
Digital Inclusion Blueprint ElementsSource: Microsoft Corp. 6/07                               Arizona Telecommunications ...
W2i Digital Inclusion FrameworkSource: W2i Digital Inclusion Forum 2008                        Arizona Telecommunications ...
Source: Strategic Networks Group (SNG)                       Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
Catalyzing Roles for Government in Broadband DeploymentSource: Gillett et al., 2004/IBM Center for The Business of Governm...
Drivers and Inhibitors of Metropolitan Wireless NetworksSource: IBM Center for The Business of Government 2007
Local Broadband Team Involvement Matrix     Existing Broadband Elements to Evaluate Assessing & Aggregating Demand Matrix ...
Local Broadband Team Involvement Matrix    Sub-Team Tasks and Competencies                                          Source...
Colorado’s 7 A’s for Community BroadbandNorthwest Colorado Local Technology Planning Team (LTPT) utilizes a formulaknown a...
RTC’s Broadband Planning PrinciplesSource: Rural Telecom Congress (RTC) 2010
The Network Investor Equation                    C - Capital Expenditures                    O - Operating Expenditures   ...
How Community Efforts Can Change the MathSource: Blair Levin, Executive Director, Gig.U 2012
Blandin Community Broadband Decision Tree
DAC Broadband Strategic PlanTable of Contents             Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
DAC Broadband Strategic Plan TakeawaysKey Messages:•Creating Arizona’s leading-edge digital infrastructure for the 21st ce...
DAC Broadband Strategic Plan ActionsRecommendation #4: Planning & Economic Development Suggested Actions              Reco...
DAC Broadband Strategic Plan ResourcesFederal ResourcesState Digital Capacity Plans and ResourcesArizona State ResourcesNa...
ASET Rural Broadband GrantsPart of the five year NTIA Broadband Grant is designated for State andCommunity Broadband Plann...
Arizona Councils of Government (COGs) &Metropolitan Planning Organizations MPOs)Central Arizona Association ofGovernments ...
What We’ve Learned AboutMunicipal Wireless So Far• Technology changes quickly• Partnerships can stall network projects• To...
Section 2: Arizona Broadband MappingPortal and CapabilitiesTapas Das, GIS Programmer,Arizona State Land Department (ASLD) ...
Arizona Telecommunications Directory (ATD) Web PortalATIC’s web portal                                    http://www.arizo...
Arizona Broadband Map Intro Video (2:30)       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0LioeYmWvw                  Arizona Telecom...
Arizona Broadband YouTube Channel       http://www.youtube.com/user/ArizonaBroadband                   Arizona Telecommuni...
Arizona Broadband Community Planning Map     http://broadbandmap.az.gov/CommunityPlanningMap/                   Arizona Te...
Arizona Broadband Mapping DemonstrationStep by Step Demonstration:•Press F11 to go Full Screen•Enter an AZ address of inte...
Arizona Provider Count & Maximum Speed Heat MapsSource: Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET) Spring 2012
Community Snapshots Linked to Broadband MapSource: Bill Bolin/Systems Technology Staffing, LLC                           A...
Section 3: Community BroadbandDeployment Modeling and PrioritizationMark Goldstein, President, International Research Cent...
Strategy: Accelerate Building Capacity withLean Government By Harnessing Existing AssetsLeverage Public Rights-of-way and ...
ASET DAP Highway Conduit InitiativePrimary Approach: Deploy conduit along state highways and ruralfrontage roads to be lea...
DAP State Highway Deployment OpportunitiesSource: Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET) 2012
Arizona Digital Connections           Summit 2012The MatrixJeffrey Crane – DAP Project Manager
Prioritization Matrix                   The Why• To support the evaluation and prioritization of:   •DAP Proof-of-Concept ...
Prioritization Matrix                        The What•Tool assists the decision making process by:   • Road segments (63) ...
Prioritization Matrix                                       The How•Supports a Management By Objective (MBO)framework orie...
Education      Health                                           Priority 1 = Good ROI   1st Responder                     ...
K-12 School Facilities                      # of Students (K-12)     Education        # Community College Campus          ...
ter t                          Bet rne                           Int ehttp://DigitalAZ.govJeffrey.crane@azdoa.gov         ...
Digital Arizona Tactical Model Illustration           Source: Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET)       ...
Possible Digital Arizona Program Funding ModelSource: Mike Keeling, Data Site Consortium 2012                             ...
Possible Digital Arizona Program FundingAn implementation and funding model is being developed in which the State ofArizon...
Microsoft/Arnold Group Economic Impact ModelArizona Telecommunications and Information Institute (ATI Institute)partnered ...
Arizona Digital InclusionEconomic Impact Model Summary              Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
Arizona Digital InclusionEconomic Impact Model Approach              Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
Arizona Economic Impact Model Key ParametersASET and Data Site Consortium are currently investigating extension ofthe Micr...
Recommended Community Demographic SourcesAmerican Community Survey (U.S. Census) -http://www.census.gov/acs/www/American F...
Community Broadband Workshop PresentersMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center andSecretary, Arizona Tele...
ATIC Summit - Community Broadband Workshop 11/13/12
ATIC Summit - Community Broadband Workshop 11/13/12
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ATIC Summit - Community Broadband Workshop 11/13/12

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The Arizona Telecom & Information Council (ATIC) recently held a Broadband Summit. This is the slide deck from the Community Broadband Workshop that I anchored and put together. Session description was "A primary strategy of the Digital Arizona Program (DAP) is to provide funding, technical assistance, and support to the four rural Councils Of Government (COGS) and/or local communities to create Broadband Planning Committees. These committees and other stakeholder groups will develop and implement plans to expedite deployment of affordable high speed broadband services to their rural communities and to enable those communities and citizens to use next generation Broadband to support 21st Century education and workforce development, create jobs and support economic and community development, enhance public safety as well as health care and government services, and connect their citizens to the world. When you attend this workshop you will learn about resources, strategies, and tools to support the development of your community plans and engagement of your community's stakeholders."

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  • ATIC Broadband Technologies Brief 5/12/07 by MG/IRC
  • If we were given 20million today, we could not move forward without establishing this framework and systematic process
  • ATIC Summit - Community Broadband Workshop 11/13/12

    1. 1. Community Broadband Planning Workshop Tuesday, November 13, 2012 (Final) Moderated by Mark Goldstein, President, International Research Center and ATIC SecretaryPhone: 602-470-0389, E-Mail: markg@researchedge.com
    2. 2. Community Broadband Workshop OverviewA primary strategy of the Digital Arizona Program (DAP) is toprovide funding, technical assistance, and support to the four ruralCouncils Of Government (COGS) and/or local communities tocreate Broadband Planning Committees. These committees andother stakeholder groups will develop and implement plans toexpedite deployment of affordable high speed broadband servicesto their rural communities and to enable those communities andcitizens to use next generation Broadband to support 21st Centuryeducation and workforce development, create jobs and supporteconomic and community development, enhance public safety aswell as health care and government services, and connect theircitizens to the world. When you attend this workshop you will learnabout resources, strategies, and tools to support the developmentof your community plans and engagement of your communitysstakeholders. Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    3. 3. Community Broadband Workshop PresentersMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center andSecretary, Arizona Telecommunications & Information Council (ATIC) Phone: (602) 479-0389, E-Mail: markg@researchedge.com URL: http://www.researchedge.com/Tapas Das, GIS Programmer,Arizona State Land Department (ASLD) Phone: (602) 542-3194, E-Mail: tdas@azland.gov URL: http://www.land.state.az.us/Jeffrey Crane, Project Manager, Digital Arizona Program (DAP),Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET),Arizona Department of Administration (ADOA) Phone: (602) 364-0585, E-Mail: jeffrey.crane@azdoa.gov URL: http://aset.azdoa.gov/ Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    4. 4. Section 1: Community BroadbandEngagement Background & ProcessesMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center andSecretary, Arizona Telecommunications & Information Council(ATIC) • Connect and Communicate Trends • Quick View of Broadband Technologies • Community Broadband Engagement & Planning • DAC Broadband Strategic Plan • ASET Rural Broadband Grants Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    5. 5. Connect and CommunicateSource: International Research Center (http://www.researchedge.com/)
    6. 6. Modern Home Network ExampleSource: International Research Center (http://www.researchedge.com/)
    7. 7. Source: Intel Corporation 2012
    8. 8. Evolution of Computer Power/CostSource: Hans Moravec, Artificial Intelligence Pioneer 2009AKA Raymond Kurzweil’s Singularity http://www.singularity.com/
    9. 9. The Internet of Thingshttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_Things
    10. 10. Mobile Data Traffic Forecast for North America in 2016•In North America, mobile data traffic will grow 17-fold from 2011 to 2016, a compoundannual growth rate of 75%.•In North America, mobile data traffic will reach 1,964,477 Terabytes (1.96 Exabytes) permonth in 2016, the equivalent of 491 million DVDs each month or 5,414 million text messageseach second.•In North America, mobile data traffic will reach an annual run rate of 24 Exabytes in 2016.•North American mobile data traffic will grow 4 times faster than North American fixed IPtraffic from 2011 to 2016. (An official Cisco VNI fixed IP traffic forecast through 2016 will notbe released until June 2012.)•In North America, mobile data traffic will account for 7% of North American fixed and mobiledata traffic in 2016, up from 1% in 2011. (An official Cisco VNI fixed IP traffic forecast through2016 will not be released until June 2012.)•In North America, mobile data traffic in 2016 will be equivalent to 4x the volume of the entireNorth American Internet in 2005.•In North America, the average mobile connection will generate 4,165 megabytes of mobiledata traffic per month in 2016, up 1,185% from 324 megabytes per month in 2011, a CAGR of67%.Source: Cisco Systems Visual Networking Index (VNI) at The Connected Lifehttp://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns827/networking_solutions_sub_solution.html
    11. 11. Communications Spectrum Supply and Demand
    12. 12. Phone Modem, DSL, T1/T3 over Copper Technology Basics Pros ConsPhone Modem Up to 56Kbps Lowest common Slow, slow, slow, upstream & 80Kbps denominator, Performance rarelyover Plain Old downstream over Embedded in many near top speedsTelephone standard phone PCs & laptops, (YMMV), Ties up aService (POTS) circuits, Worldwide Works over standard voice phone line data standard (V.92) phone line, $0-22/mo when in use, LegacyDigital High frequencies Multiple variants Distance sensitive over standard POTS ADSL, VDSL, etc. generally 3K to 18KSubscriber Line voice circuits, Typ. can serve data and ft. from CO/DSLAM,(DSL) speeds 256Kbps sometimes video, ILEC infrastructure up/768Kbps down Modest cost to investments & up to 50Mbps VDSL homes & enterprises availability spottyT-1/T-3 Circuits ILEC/CLEC provided Long-standing T-1 $300-1200/mo, data service for enterprise grade T-3 Lots of $$$, All enterprises, Rates of data delivery for locations not T1=1.5Mbps & multiple protocols, serviceable, Legacy T3=45Mbps services & uses option in IP era Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    13. 13. Cable Modem, Fiber Optics, FSO Technology Basics Pros ConsCable Modem Cable MSOs have 5-50 Mbps down Not available broadly deployed in today at low cost everywhere U.S., Delivered over (multiple available especially rural, coax with TV and tiers), DOCSIS 3.0 to Neighborhood loop Voice/VoIP as triple 160Mbps deploying, config., Best pricing play from FTTN good metro footprint when bundledFiber Optics Highest capacity w. Highest capacity for Metro rings but very OC-3 (155Mbps) to middle & long haul, limited last mile OC-192 (10Gbps) per Multiple lambda (λ) infrastructure, PON lambda (λ) of light, per fiber & multiple deployments will No interference fibers per cable, likely reach few FTTP possible homes & businessesFree Space Laser optical OC-3 (155Mbps) to $20-50K per transceivers over air OC-48 (2.5Gbps) transceiver pair,Optics (FSO) good for 3-5 Km, over a lambda (λ) of Distance limitations, Modest equipment light, Enterprise Sensitive to fog and cost & no ROW use campus applications dust storms (use and some metro microwave backup) Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    14. 14. Cellular, Wi-Fi, WiMAX Wireless Technology Basics Pros ConsCellular Traditional voice Good metro & Coverage spotty or services transportation nonexistent in some complemented by corridor coverage, places especially 3G data services Improving 4G rural, High cost data from 150K to 1Mbps coverage with data plans often with and 4G to 10Mbps+ rates to 10Mbps+ bandwidth capsWi-Fi Wireless Local Area Common WLAN for Security settings Network (WLAN) homes & business, often not configured through 802.11 spec, Mesh configurations & concerns vs. wired Low cost CPE in lend to municipal services, Short retail channels, networks, Modest distances, RF Fixed & nomadic cost channel conflictWiMAX & Microwave P2P for Long distances of Licensed vs. backhaul, 802.16 20-100 miles, Fairly unlicensedWireless Point spec firming for high data rates, frequency issues,to Point fixed & mobile, Fair WiMAX will be Limited deployment speeds & distances embedded in future to date Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    15. 15. Satellite, Bluetooth, Zigbee, UWB, BPL Technology Basics Pros ConsSatellite Orbital platforms for Data services cover Slower speeds earth sensing and continental U.S., (≈256Kbps up/ communications, Available alternative 600Kbps down) and Uses geostationary for rural customers, higher cost for orbits for most data Higher speeds being customers, Data services rolled out capsBluetooth, Personal Area Low power, versatile Short distances Network (PAN) for wireless peripheral (<=10M Bluetooth &Zigbee & Ultra peripherals and interface to multiple <=30M UWB), RFWideband media access, devices, Wireless interference issues(UWB) Bluetooth common USB utilizes UWB in mobile devicesBroadband over Modest data speeds Leverages electrical Signal injection and carried over power distribution transformer bypassPower Line lines into homes and infrastructure, investments(BPL) businesses, Current Power company can significant, RF trials around U.S. partner with ISPs interference issues Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    16. 16. Digital Inclusion Blueprint ElementsSource: Microsoft Corp. 6/07 Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    17. 17. W2i Digital Inclusion FrameworkSource: W2i Digital Inclusion Forum 2008 Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    18. 18. Source: Strategic Networks Group (SNG) Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    19. 19. Catalyzing Roles for Government in Broadband DeploymentSource: Gillett et al., 2004/IBM Center for The Business of Government 2007
    20. 20. Drivers and Inhibitors of Metropolitan Wireless NetworksSource: IBM Center for The Business of Government 2007
    21. 21. Local Broadband Team Involvement Matrix Existing Broadband Elements to Evaluate Assessing & Aggregating Demand Matrix Adopting Existing Resources & Solutions MatrixSource: Frank Ohrtman, WMX Systems
    22. 22. Local Broadband Team Involvement Matrix Sub-Team Tasks and Competencies Source: Frank Ohrtman, WMX Systems
    23. 23. Colorado’s 7 A’s for Community BroadbandNorthwest Colorado Local Technology Planning Team (LTPT) utilizes a formulaknown as the “7 A’s” attributing it to success in improving broadbandinfrastructure regionally:1. Aggregate Experience: Establishment of Northwest Colorado LTPT;2. Assess Local Broadband Environment: identification of single, low bandwidth middlemile services into the Northwest Colorado as hindrance to all telecoms in the region3. Assess Demand: multiple speed tests and surveys show much of the region to have nobroadband as defined by FCC ( 4 Mbps down 1 Mbps up)4. Aggregate Demand: The LTPT has conducted a number of surveys with local serviceproviders and determined that total demand by local service providers and communityanchor institutions is at least 3 gigabits per second (Gbps).5. Aggregate Resources: a) local funding as organized via Northwest Colorado Council ofGovernments and Steamboat Springs Chamber of Commerce b) low-cost local tower sitesc) use disruptive technologies including microwave d) creation of carrier neutral locations(CNL) in Steamboat Springs and Craig e) explore availability of dark fiber: Rifle toSteamboat Springs F) fiber conduit in Steamboat Springs6. Aggregate Solutions: a) Phase I: microwave path from fiber point of presence in Fraserto Steamboat Springs, b) Phase II: fiber route from fiber point of presence in Rifle to Craig7. Aggregate Sustainability: a) Local service providers build middle mile that is redundant,abundant and affordable b) middle mile project is locally funded and operated c) electedofficials hope to see this model replicated throughout the Northwest Colorado
    24. 24. RTC’s Broadband Planning PrinciplesSource: Rural Telecom Congress (RTC) 2010
    25. 25. The Network Investor Equation C - Capital Expenditures O - Operating Expenditures r - Risk R- Revenues SB- System Benefits (Benefits that drive increased revenues outside the communities where the new or incremental investments are made.) CL- Losses due to competition Changing the Network Investor MathSource: Blair Levin, Executive Director, Gig.U 2012
    26. 26. How Community Efforts Can Change the MathSource: Blair Levin, Executive Director, Gig.U 2012
    27. 27. Blandin Community Broadband Decision Tree
    28. 28. DAC Broadband Strategic PlanTable of Contents Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    29. 29. DAC Broadband Strategic Plan TakeawaysKey Messages:•Creating Arizona’s leading-edge digital infrastructure for the 21st century is a task thatmust be shared by government, industry, educators, researchers, communityinstitutions, entrepreneurs, and philanthropists.•Arizona needs to remove barriers, develop public policy, and market-driven strategiesthat encourage private-sector investment.•Cost effective access needs to be available throughout the entire state.•Primary strategy is to enable the private sector but government and alternative fundingmay be required where the ROI is not feasible.Key Recommendations:•DIGITAL BUILD OUT - Facilitate the Build Out of High-Speed Digital Infrastructure by thePrivate Sector in Cooperation with Government Entities to Provide for the Needs of AllArizonans•INCREASE ADOPTION - Increase the Use and Adoption of High Capacity DigitalConnectivity and Technologies•LEADERSHIP - Formalize and Sustain State-Level and Regional Digital Leadership•PLANNING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT - Drive Digital-Related CommunityPlanning and Economic Development•OUTREACH - Drive Outreach through Policies, Programs, and Local Engagement Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    30. 30. DAC Broadband Strategic Plan ActionsRecommendation #4: Planning & Economic Development Suggested Actions Recommendation #5: Outreach Suggested Actions • Provide resources and informational seminars on digital capacity to communities and regional organizations • Provide collaboration opportunities related to digital concerns to communities and regional organizations • Provide to communities digital last-mile infrastructure planning templates and checklists • Provide digital technical consulting to communities (analyses, planning, proposals, and implementation) • Provide assistance to community and regional organizations in writing digital grant applications Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    31. 31. DAC Broadband Strategic Plan ResourcesFederal ResourcesState Digital Capacity Plans and ResourcesArizona State ResourcesNational Nonprofit OrganizationsNational Trade AssociationsArizona Nonprofit Organizations and Trade AssociationsNational & Arizona eLearning and Technology in Education ResourcesNational & Arizona Telehealth ResourcesNational & Arizona eGovernment ResourcesNational & Arizona Discovery, Innovation and Research ResourcesNational & Arizona Smart Energy and Environmental ResourcesNational & Arizona Public Safety Communications ResourcesNational & Arizona Native American ResourcesArizona Statistical ResourcesCommunity Toolkits, Economic and Financial ModelingMiscellaneous Resources Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    32. 32. ASET Rural Broadband GrantsPart of the five year NTIA Broadband Grant is designated for State andCommunity Broadband Planning. ASET in partnership with the ArizonaTelecom & Information Institute (ATI Institute) is working with the fourrural Councils of Government (COGs) to establish and coordinateprograms to provide consultants and support for:•Local Broadband Capacity Evaluation, Planning and Building•Community Stakeholder Identification and Engagement•Regional Broadband Events and Training•Strategic Planning for Digital Inclusion and Broadband Projects•Technical Assistance to: • Assess Community Assets and Broadband Capabilities • Plan for Demand Aggregation • Develop Business Cases • Identify and Investigate Grant Opportunities • Promote Community Engagement Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    33. 33. Arizona Councils of Government (COGs) &Metropolitan Planning Organizations MPOs)Central Arizona Association ofGovernments (CAAG) -http://www.caagcentral.org/Maricopa Association of Governments(MAG) - http://www.mag.maricopa.gov/Northern Arizona Council ofGovernments (NACOG) -http://www.nacog.org/Pima Association of Governments(PAG) - http://www.pagnet.org/Southeastern Arizona GovernmentsOrganization (SEAGO) -http://www.seago.org/Western Arizona Council ofGovernments (WACOG) -http://www.wacog.com/
    34. 34. What We’ve Learned AboutMunicipal Wireless So Far• Technology changes quickly• Partnerships can stall network projects• Topography can drive network costs up• Constituents have unrealistic expectations• Politics stand in the way of deployment• Digital inclusion initiatives don’t take off• Network success rests on sound businessmodel planningSource: Forrester Research 12/07 Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    35. 35. Section 2: Arizona Broadband MappingPortal and CapabilitiesTapas Das, GIS Programmer,Arizona State Land Department (ASLD) • ATIC Arizona Telecommunications Directory (ATD) • Arizona Broadband Map Introductory Video • Arizona Broadband Map Introductory Demonstration • Arizona Provider Count & Maximum Speed Heat Maps • Community Data Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    36. 36. Arizona Telecommunications Directory (ATD) Web PortalATIC’s web portal http://www.arizonatele.com/located AZ telecomproviders by geographyand services offered,displaying availabilityand profiles. Provider Profile Continues 
    37. 37. Arizona Broadband Map Intro Video (2:30) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0LioeYmWvw Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    38. 38. Arizona Broadband YouTube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/ArizonaBroadband Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    39. 39. Arizona Broadband Community Planning Map http://broadbandmap.az.gov/CommunityPlanningMap/ Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    40. 40. Arizona Broadband Mapping DemonstrationStep by Step Demonstration:•Press F11 to go Full Screen•Enter an AZ address of interest•Zoom to the Target•Fade to Aerial Base Map and Back to Streets Base Map•Census Blocks: Minimize Find an Address Widget, Open Search Widget, Use Select by Point, Zoom, Open Hotlink to provider, View Search Results in a Grid to see the Population and Housing Data•Chart Wizard: View the Search Results to see the Population and Housing data, Launch the Chart Widget, Cycle through demographic charts•Census Groups, Census Tracts, Zip Codes•Spatial Search around Community Anchor Institution (CAI)•Use Chart Widget to find Population•Search Broadband Providers and derive table•City data for places, Open Link to Socio-Economic Data•View Broadband Footprints by Provider•Number of Providers and Maximum Download Speed Heat Maps•Link to Help Docs Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    41. 41. Arizona Provider Count & Maximum Speed Heat MapsSource: Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET) Spring 2012
    42. 42. Community Snapshots Linked to Broadband MapSource: Bill Bolin/Systems Technology Staffing, LLC Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    43. 43. Section 3: Community BroadbandDeployment Modeling and PrioritizationMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center andSecretary, Arizona Telecommunications & Information Council(ATIC) andJeffrey Crane, Project Manager, Digital Arizona Program (DAP),Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET),Arizona Department of Administration (ADOA) • Capacity Building with Harnessing Existing Assets • ASET DAP Highway Conduit Initiative • DAP Buildout Prioritization Matrix • Microsoft/Arnold Group Economic Impact Model • Recommended Community Demographic Sources Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    44. 44. Strategy: Accelerate Building Capacity withLean Government By Harnessing Existing AssetsLeverage Public Rights-of-way and Properties • Two Highways for (nearly) the cost of one • Deploy along Highways, Canals, Power-lines, Railroads… • Utilize Government Buildings and Vertical AssetsRecommend Permitting and Easement Best PracticesPossible State Broadband & ROW Clearinghouse RoleLeverage Existing $6.3 Million Federal Grant intoSustainably Funded Mechanism(s) for Acceleration ofDigital Capacity Build-outProvide Long-range State-wide Planning and Leadershipas well as Continuing Community Support Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    45. 45. ASET DAP Highway Conduit InitiativePrimary Approach: Deploy conduit along state highways and ruralfrontage roads to be leased to providers at cost to facilitate availabilityof fiber Internet middle-mile capacity to support providers’ investmentsin more and faster services for rural Arizona.Trenching + Conduits ≈ Very low cost when road bed underconstruction or repair.Passed Arizona Digital Highways Law SB1402 to support this.Potential Funding Sources:•No funding in the Digital Highways Law itself•Some seed funding from existing grants•Leased conduit can be recycled to pay for additional capacity•Provider investment under discussion•State-wide eRate facilitation could provide funding from gain sharing•Possible shared funding with Public Safety Broadband (FirstNet) Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    46. 46. DAP State Highway Deployment OpportunitiesSource: Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET) 2012
    47. 47. Arizona Digital Connections Summit 2012The MatrixJeffrey Crane – DAP Project Manager
    48. 48. Prioritization Matrix The Why• To support the evaluation and prioritization of: •DAP Proof-of-Concept demonstrations •Statewide conduit build out staging and sequencing process 11/21/12 50
    49. 49. Prioritization Matrix The What•Tool assists the decision making process by: • Road segments (63) rather than individual communities as the basis for evaluation (2840 linear miles) Note: Approximately 250 communities • Empirical (data driven) analysis • Subjective evaluation methods 11/21/12 51
    50. 50. Prioritization Matrix The How•Supports a Management By Objective (MBO)framework oriented around three high level Objectives: • Highway segment socioeconomic impact (Educ., Health, Public Safety, Econ. Dev. [cell towers, application readiness]) • Highway segment ROI (Scope/Cost [terrain], Ownership, Market Determinants [population, demand, current infrastructure]) • Highway segment interconnectability (Technology [carrier hotels along segment], SONET Ring viability and redundancy [does it further an interconnect]) 11/21/12 52
    51. 51. Education Health Priority 1 = Good ROI 1st Responder High build out potential Disciplines by the private sectorBusiness & Economic Development Prioritization Priority 2 = Midrange ROI Matrix Scope/Cost Build out potential by private Decision Support sector with Augmentation Tool from public/private funds Road Segment Fee OwnershipMarket Determinants Priority 3 = Poor ROI No build out potential by private sector unless Public Redundancy or alternate funds used Technology 11/21/12 53
    52. 52. K-12 School Facilities # of Students (K-12) Education # Community College Campus # Community College Students # of University Campus # of University Students # Students Using Distance Learning (Now/Planned) Health Health Care Facilities/Patients per Year Law Enforcement/Personnel Fire-EMS/Personnel Utilities/Personnel 1st Responder Application Readiness (Now/Planned) Bandwidth Demand (Now/Planned) Disciplines Local Government (Facilities/Personnel) State Government (Facilities/Personnel) Fed Government (Facilities/Personnel) Private Business (Facilities/Personnel)Business & Economic Cell Towers (At Mile Markers?) Development Cell Tower Gaps (At Mile Markers?) Miles to Nearest Tier 1 Capacity Tier 1 Access Sequencing Prioritization (Direct/Indirect) Number of segments to primary Tier 1 Scope/Cost Type of Terrain/Build Difficulty Market Calculation Formula Private w/Easement State ownerd w/Easment Road Segment State Trust w/Easement Federal w/Easement Fee Ownership Tribal w/Easement Easement Negotiation Reqd (Y/N) Average verified consumer speeds Current fiber middle mile available capacityMarket Determinants Provider interest for service expansion Population Population Trend (up/Down) Major Infrastructure Project Trend Demand Potential Redundancy Mobile Wireless Potential Mobile Wireless Service Gaps Does Segment fit into Wide Area Redundancy Plan Does Segment Close a Ring Does Segment further an interconnect Technology Alt. near term wireless solutions (Telco/GovNet Microwave) Is Existing Technology MPLS on Ethernet on SONET (Y/N) 11/21/12 54
    53. 53. ter t Bet rne Int ehttp://DigitalAZ.govJeffrey.crane@azdoa.gov 11/21/12 55
    54. 54. Digital Arizona Tactical Model Illustration Source: Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET) Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    55. 55. Possible Digital Arizona Program Funding ModelSource: Mike Keeling, Data Site Consortium 2012 Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    56. 56. Possible Digital Arizona Program FundingAn implementation and funding model is being developed in which the State ofArizona could implement the Digital Arizona Highways Act of 2012 (SB 1402).This model incorporates funds from eRate programs, State educationalinvestments, broadband provider investment, public safety broadband, andother possible sources of funds.The model can provide recurring revenue to rural Arizona broadband providerswho in-turn could utilize a portion of the funds for procuring fiber conduitsand/or towers along Arizona roadways in close proximity to key rural broadbandusers. In return, the providers obtain long-term leases of the conduit and towersof interest to each of them which they are free to utilize the leases in any mannerthat is commercially viable with some selling broadband services directly tousers while others concentrate on wholesale services to the retail providers.Additionally, within the above public-private partnership constructs, ASET isexploring financing means including securitizing the leases, tax-advantagedbonding, and closer planning and funding efforts with user educational, medical-services and economic-development stakeholders. The goal is to allow marketforces to drive the expansion of retail and wholesale digital capacity throughoutrural Arizona over time. Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    57. 57. Microsoft/Arnold Group Economic Impact ModelArizona Telecommunications and Information Institute (ATI Institute)partnered with Microsoft Corporation and their Shape the Future team on aDigital Inclusion Economic Impact Model for Arizona which was executed byMicrosoft’s partner The Arnold Group at no cost to ATI Institute or the State.The model is designed to measure the economic impact of Digital Inclusioninitiatives and the cost of Digital Exclusion. It has been performed acrossthe U.S. in five states and seven cities to date.The models target segment consists of disadvantaged school-age childrenand their families as this group has the greatest long-term effect for therealization of the benefits. Arizona modeling results indicate that studentswith a home PC and broadband access increase their chance of graduatingfrom High School by 6-8 percentage points and experience an averageincrease of $1.2M in additional economic and social impact over theirlifetime. The affected individuals will also have more employmentopportunities benefiting from significant lifetime creation of jobs. Bytargeting students in poverty, over $32.4 billion in total lifetime economicand social impact can potentially be realized. Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    58. 58. Arizona Digital InclusionEconomic Impact Model Summary Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    59. 59. Arizona Digital InclusionEconomic Impact Model Approach Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    60. 60. Arizona Economic Impact Model Key ParametersASET and Data Site Consortium are currently investigating extension ofthe Microsoft/Arnold Group model to project the more general economicdevelopment impact of expanding Digital Inclusion on Arizonacommunities including employment levels and job quality, businessattractiveness, and economic growth rates. Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    61. 61. Recommended Community Demographic SourcesAmerican Community Survey (U.S. Census) -http://www.census.gov/acs/www/American FactFinder (U.S. Census) -http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtmlEsri Business Analyst -http://www.esri.com/software/businessanalyst/index.htmlEsri Community Analyst -http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/community-analystReferenceUSA - http://www.referenceusa.com/ Library Locator - http://www.referenceusa.com/Static/LibraryLocatorCity-Data.com - http://www.city-data.com/ Arizona City Data (Over 6000 Population) - http://www.city-data.com/city/Arizona.htmlADOA Office of Employment & Population Statistics - http://www.azstats.gov/Arizona Indicators (ASU Morrison Institute) - http://arizonaindicators.org/ Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council
    62. 62. Community Broadband Workshop PresentersMark Goldstein, President, International Research Center andSecretary, Arizona Telecommunications & Information Council (ATIC) Phone: (602) 479-0389, E-Mail: markg@researchedge.com URL: http://www.researchedge.com/Tapas Das, GIS Programmer,Arizona State Land Department (ASLD) Phone: (602) 542-3194, E-Mail: tdas@azland.gov URL: http://www.land.state.az.us/Jeffrey Crane, Project Manager, Digital Arizona Program (DAP),Arizona Strategic Enterprise Technology Office (ASET),Arizona Department of Administration (ADOA) Phone: (602) 364-0585, E-Mail: jeffrey.crane@azdoa.gov URL: http://aset.azdoa.gov/ Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council

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