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The Definitive Guide to Engaging Email Marketing
 

The Definitive Guide to Engaging Email Marketing

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  • My name is Jon Miller, VP Marketing and co-founder at Marketo, and author of the DG2MA.Today, I’m thrilled to be joined by Lorena…I’m @jonmiller, and Lorena is @harrilor, so please feel free to engage with us during or after the presentation on Twitter using #DG2MA
  • Please note that today’s webinar is being recorded. It will be available on-demand soon after the conclusion of the webcast.We will conclude today’s event with a Q&A session. Please feel free to submit your questions throughout and we will get to as many of your questions as we can. You can enter questions by typing your question in the box on the left-hand side of your screen.
  • So how are we responding to this? Not good.So between the marketers that are still batching and blasting, or sending personalized messages that aren’t relevant right now, this is kind of what it feels like to be a consumer today.  On any given day, the average customer will be exposed to 2,904 media messages, will pay attention to 52 and will positively remember 4 – SuperProfile 2010  
  • Your consumer is like a sponge, and all those marketing messages are like the water.How do you ensure that your message is the one of the 4that get absorbed into the sponge? After all, a potential buyer can only absorb so much, and your competitors are vying for their attention too.
  • Think about it: you probably pay the most attention to emails from friends, family, and colleagues, people with whom you have genuine, trusted relationships.Sure, the relationship between a brand and a consumer is never exactly the same as the relationship between friends and family, but marketers can narrow the gap.Brands can enjoy some of the benefits of a trusted relationship by marketing to the buyer in a natural, non-marketing-speak way that truly engages him.The best marketing doesn’t feel like marketing at all.------------The answer: our communicationsmust be more trusted, more relevant, and more strategic. It must be more engaging.  Traditional batch and blast feels like shouting, engagement marketing feels more like a natural conversation. Notice how these women are engaged in conversation. There’s talking, but also listening going on. And the conversation, at least by the looks of it, seems to have a flow to it. [Refer back to this throughout the presentation: how important it is to effectively listen to online body language.]
  • The answer: our communicationsmust be more trusted, more relevant, and more strategic. It must be more engaging.  Traditional batch and blast feels like shouting, engagement marketing feels more like a natural conversation. Notice how these women are engaged in conversation. There’s talking, but also listening going on. And the conversation, at least by the looks of it, seems to have a flow to it. [Refer back to this throughout the presentation: how important it is to effectively listen to online body language.]
  • So how can we be more relevant and engaging?You can’t be relevant if you’re broad.We know batch and blast does not work – it is simply less engaging. One way is to be more targeted – smaller sends = more engaging. Engagement Score enables marketers to quickly judge how effectively each piece of content is engaging prospects and customers over time… combines open, click, unsubscribe, conversion, and so on into a single metrics. “Segmented email campaigns produce 30% more opens than undifferentiated messages.” — Monetate’s Intelligent Email Marketing that Drives Conversions (2012)
  • The key to relevance is behavioral targeting.So you want relevancy and engagement – but this requires sophisticated targeting that combines online body language (web traffic, search behavior, email response) plus transactional data plus with lifestyle and demographic data (personas)When behavioral cues are not used, email can be experienced as a dissonant interruption. What the sender considers a coordinated "drip campaign" may feel more like water torture to the receiver.
  • Here’s an example of how Marketo created even more relevance.Topic of interest nurturing: Nurture tracks based on four different topics that we thought our customers were interested in (email, social marketing, marketing automation, and Microsoft Dynamics). Welisten for signs that may be interested in this (events attended, web visits, keywords used etc.), and if so assign them to the specific track nurture track. If they get to the end of that specific track, we put them back to regular until they do something else specific.
  • Result: Big lift!More on our blog about this: http://blog.marketo.com/blog/2013/06/topic-of-interest-based-nurturing.html
  • purchase history, deposit, withdrawal, cart abandonment, data usage, etcCLOSING:Fundamentally, consumers increasingly expect companies to keep seamless track of their purchasing history, communication preferences, and desires. They know how much information is available, and expect marketers to use it. They expect you to know the answers questions such as: What did they want? What did they look at? How did they react? … and then to use that information to create more relevant interactions. Consumers look for a unified and personalized experience across all of your touchpoints: your website, social media and photo platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram), email marketing, etc. Whether they’re in front of their computers at work or in lines at post offices on their mobile devices, they expect an experience that’s streamlined and consistent — and it must be personal, too. They also expect you to recognize them — this is where it becomes critical to capture and store data over time and across channels — and then feed them the exact information they want at the moment you interact with them.
  • The answer: our communicationsmust be more trusted, more relevant, and more strategic. It must be more engaging.  Traditional batch and blast feels like shouting, engagement marketing feels more like a natural conversation. Notice how these women are engaged in conversation. There’s talking, but also listening going on. And the conversation, at least by the looks of it, seems to have a flow to it. [Refer back to this throughout the presentation: how important it is to effectively listen to online body language.]
  • Short history of email:Commercial email first evolved from a traditional direct mail mindset: lists, promotions, offers. Big campaigns. Send the same message frequently and rapidly to many. 1-2% response rates. Sent on your schedule, not theirs. One of email’s biggest “benefits” was its low cost compared to direct mail. But email was too easy. When companies combined the ease of sending large quantities emails with the low cost of doing so, it resulted in a recipe for a sender's dream but a receiver's nightmare. “Batch and blast” was off and running.But the problem was this: Nobody wants to get “blasted”.Think of the word blast....what do you imagine? It's a shotgun. Wide pattern, random spread, unfocused (for the most part) and an imprecise tool whose end result is one that sometimes leaves more damage than any benefit you might have gained. .. It hurts. Casualty of war.Terms like “hit the database” or “e-shot” are just as bad.
  • This is what it sounds like when done wrong.It beats an incessant drum for subscribers. And does not engage them or enthuse them to open in future,
  • Every interaction is a link within the context of a communication supply chain.Don’t look at each discrete message, or even each campaign, as a unique event. Marketing is not a candy machine.
  • This is more like what you want your communications to be….
  • Email service providers traditional don’t help much. ESPs tend to only track email behaviors (open, click) in their local database. Lacking connection to other buyer touch points, standalone email services are unable to inform communication with more personal behavioral cues.But for more sophisticated targeting, they rely on technical databasesThese lists come from complex queries written by technical experts, not marketers. This includes API calls, SAS queries, and some email providers even tout the fact that their queries can be written in “good old fashioned SQL” (they even provide functionality for handling situations where the SQL-queries time out!)Don’t use dumb lists, use a smart database – easy!!And easy to change
  • While this may be straightforward for programmers, it’s a foreign language to most marketers…This makes the marketer reliant on technical resources for anything that’s not simple, especially anything that incorporates behaviors beyond email open and click
  • While this may be straightforward for programmers, it’s a foreign language to most marketers…This makes the marketer reliant on technical resources for anything that’s not simple, especially anything that incorporates behaviors beyond email open and click
  • While this may be straightforward for programmers, it’s a foreign language to most marketers…This makes the marketer reliant on technical resources for anything that’s not simple, especially anything that incorporates behaviors beyond email open and click
  • While this may be straightforward for programmers, it’s a foreign language to most marketers…This makes the marketer reliant on technical resources for anything that’s not simple, especially anything that incorporates behaviors beyond email open and click
  • You think it’s easy, draw a simple diagram on the whiteboard
  • But the real world is not that simple. Real conversations are not that simple. Buyers do things you don’t expect. You can’t “script out” the buyer’s process, or the entire conversation. You wouldn’t show up at a cocktail party with everything you were going to say scripted out into simple “if-then” branches. You quickly see that “flow chart” like solutions are inflexible, and difficult to setup and manage. Lots of use cases to worry about.What is prospect does something?---Hard to use: The complexity makes them usable only for serious technical experts. As David Raab, marketing technology expert and consultant says, “I never saw a flow chart interface that actually did a good job handling complexity. So I've reluctantly concluded that flow charts are only suitable for serious technical experts.”Less agile. When you need to rewire complex flow-charts, it can take seemingly forever add or change the content in tracksError-prone, harder to be intelligent. The complexity of spaghetti makes it error prone. Too easy to send expired content, duplicate content, or too much content. “Why are you still sending me an invitation for a webinar from last week?” “I just downloaded this off your site 2 days ago, and now you’re sending it again!” “Do you guys realize how much you send me each day? I’ve had it!”Difficult to see who is where. It can be hard to know how many people are in any track at any given point, and even harder to see how many consumer have reached the end and “exhausted” the track. As a result, consumers may end up not getting any content unless you catch this!As a result, marketers using traditional solutions are limited in their ability to have an interactive, dynamic and customized dialog with prospects and customers. Quote: “My own opinion is quite firm: flow charts don't work. They look good in demonstrations and can lay out simple processes quite nicely. But they get impossibly convoluted once you try to do something complex.” - David Raab, marketing technology consultant and analyst
  • Automation Makes Personal Conversations ScalableHaving a conversation with one subscriber at a time is easy, and you can even do it manually. You could probably even manage dozens of consumer conversations manually, in fact. But there is a real scalability issue when your subscribers start to number in the hundreds, thousands, or millions, because you still want to have relevant, personalized conversations with each and every one.Some companies try to implement these processes using the wrong tools. Remember the “I Love Lucy” episode in which Lucy took a job working at a candy factory? She could handle packaging when it involved just a few chocolates, but as the volume increased, things got messy (and funny!). When your subscriber volume increases, it’s as if your conversations are on a fast-moving conveyer belt. Without the right technology to keep you up to speed, your marketing could become a mess, and no one will find humor in that! That’s why automation is critical to customer engagement — there is no other way to have one-to-one conversations with your customers on a large scale. Automation allows you to be relevant to each and every one of your customers, and let them feel listened to and respected. Remarkably, in this new digital era, we’re back to the good old-fashioned business ethic of putting the customer first!\