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Women Money Power Client Presentation Ent374 0409

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Let me teach you how to determine your female financial personality

Let me teach you how to determine your female financial personality

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  • [AUDIO SCRIPT – DO NOT READ] My name is Joyce and I’ve been divorced for a little over three years. I share a condo with my cat, Sam. I have to grown children. My daughter was married last spring and is expecting my first grandbaby. My son is moving back home this fall and plans to attend an area technical institute. My father died last year and my mother recently suffered a series of small medical setbacks. I was the first in my family to graduate from college, and I hold an associate degree in applied science. For the past 12 years I’ve worked as a tech for a small veterinary clinic. I earn a modest but comfortable salary. Over the years, I’ve steadily contributed to my 401(k) plan. I closely watch my spending, faithfully pay my bills, and carry little debt. By all outward appearances, I should be well on track to retire at age 65. But I’m not so sure. When I was married, my husband handled all the household finances and investments. I was responsible for paying the bills and keeping the checkbook. Earlier this year, I went to the library and checked out a book on finance and investing. But I struggled to fully grasp how the complex concepts applied to my particular situation. So I enrolled in a community education class on retirement planning. The presenter was a polished speaker and seemed knowledgeable. Still, I felt slightly uncomfortable and wasn’t sure what questions to ask.
  • [AUDIO SCRIPT CONT’D - DO NOT READ] I want to be able to help my mother. I want to be there for my kids and grandkids, too. But I worry about the possibility of someday ending up a homeless “bag lady.” I know I need to take steps – and sooner, not later. I’m just not sure what those steps are, and in what direction to take them…
  • How many of you can relate to part or all of Joyce’s situation? Even if you don’t identify with Joyce’s life situation, you may still share her feelings of concern about her financial future. Do you feel uncertain about your financial future? Are you wondering where to start or where to go from here? You are not alone! Welcome! My name is ___________ and I am your host for this seminar. “ Congratulations” on being here today. Taking the time to attend this seminar is an important first step in helping manage your financial future.
  • In order to help you get the most out of this seminar, we’ve included some optional participant activities. That’s why we’ve provided each of you with a Financial Plan Discovery Journal. As we go through this information, I encourage you to make note of any insights you gain that may be useful to you and your family. These could be ideas, questions, or even concerns. There are some key points in the seminar where we’ll stop and allow some time for discussion and notes on particular topics. There is also plenty of space for any other notes you wish to take. All of this is strictly optional. No one will be put on the spot. I’m glad you’re here to learn more on this important topic, so let’s get started.
  • Today I’m going to provide you with insight and information on a few important topics. First, we’re going to talk about why you need a financial strategy and the guidance of a financial professional. Next, we’ll discuss how to understand who you are financially and what role that information plays in working with a financial professional. Finally, we’ll go over a few easy steps you can take to begin the process of setting up a financial strategy. I welcome any questions you might have at any point during the presentation. We’ll also have a question and answer period at the end.
  • So, the big question is…as a woman, why do you need a financial strategy? There are many reasons: Your roles are evolving and you have more responsibilities than ever before Like many women, you may feel financially insecure Life can come at you fast – are you financially prepared for the life-changing events that might occur? You might find yourself as a part of the “Sandwich Generation” and are faced with the challenge of raising children and taking care of aging parents Some of you might face one or all of these issues. This list might seem overwhelming to you. But, the good news is that you CAN be prepared! Let’s take a look at each of these issues in more detail…
  • First, how are women’s roles in society evolving? One way is education. Did you know: Out of all college graduates in 2008, 58.4% were women 1 Since 2006, over half of women with business degrees out-earn their husbands. 2 Congratulations! That’s a huge accomplishment. Think about all of the financial opportunities your education could open up in your life. How will you manage those opportunities? How will those opportunities affect your long and short-term financial goals? Having a financial strategy in place can help you! 1 U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics , annual. 2 Marketing to Women, Marti Barletta, January 2006
  • The next area that your role as women has been evolving is in society and the economy. Take a look at these statistics: The percentage of women in the workforce almost doubled in the second half of the last century, from 32% to 62%. 3 The number of women earning $100,000 or more has quadrupled in the last decade. 4 Another great accomplishment… Women are out in the workforce earning money for themselves and their families. But once again, with the increased financial earning power comes increased financial responsibility. A financial strategy can help you manage your income effectively to meet your financial goals now and in the future. 3 Department of Education 2006. 4 Marketing to Women , Marti Barletta, January 2006.
  • As we saw in the previous slides, women have accomplished a lot in society and in the economy. While you’ve been making all of that impressive progress, your level of financial responsibility has also been increasing! Think about this… It’s projected that by 2010, 60% of all the wealth in the United States will be controlled by women. 5 Wow! Think about that… You as women could control 60% of all the wealth in the United States just 1 year from now! That’s a HUGE responsibility. With that responsibility comes the need for you to be financially educated and to have a financial strategy in place to manage that extra financial accountability. 5 “The Guru of Retirement,” Wealth Manager , February, 2007.
  • One more thing to consider… did you know that 90% of all women will be solely responsible for their finances at some point in their lives? 6 Are you prepared for that possibility? If not, doesn’t it make sense to have a plan in place and to educate yourself? You need to be ready to take on a more active role in your finances. 6 Trendsight Group, 2006
  • Discovery Journal. How do you feel about your financial future? Take a minute to consider what you feel and what thoughts come to mind. Does anyone want to share their feelings with the group? (In case participants are not open to sharing, presenter should be prepared to share their own thoughts/feelings that might be typical examples. Attempt to demonstrate the similarity of feelings most women share and how they are not alone). Most women do feel financially insecure.
  • Another key reason why you need a financial strategy is to combat the feelings of financial insecurity that many women face. But, know that you are not alone! The feeling of “financial insecurity” is widespread; even among women who are considered financially “well off” by most standards. In fact, 90% of women say they feel somewhat financially insecure. 7 It’s not your fault… in fact, there are some lingering effects of traditional values that may contribute to your feelings of financial insecurity. 7 The Allianz Women, Money, and Power Study, 2006.
  • While you’ve been forging new roles, society has been slow to keep pace with your new reality. For generations, women typically weren’t educated on matters of investing and finance – at home or in school. Instead of advising them to be knowledgeable and financially “well-prepared,” parents encouraged their daughters to “marry well.” And few school counselors encouraged young women to pursue careers in insurance and finance. Little has changed. A study by Allianz shows that only 18% of women teach their children about finances. 8 8 The Allianz Women, Money and Power Study, 2006.
  • Discover Journal: What money messages do you have that you learned from your childhood? We’re you taught anything specifically or are they general messages you learned by observation? (In case participants are not open to sharing, presenter should be prepared to share their own thoughts/feelings that might be typical examples. Attempt to demonstrate how money messages were rarely passed along to women. Most of us have varying messages that we picked up by observation).
  • In addition, women haven’t had the benefit of as much financial information and support from other sources: The financial industry, as a whole, has been slow to recognize women as distinct and valuable customers for financial products and services Women’s magazines have typically published few articles on money and investing and they include very few ads for insurance and financial products. If “knowledge is power”, it’s no wonder that the general lack of financial education and information has resulted in a feeling of financial insecurity for many women.
  • Another reason why you need a financial strategy is to prepare for life events. Each stage of life brings events that can Reshape your financial needs and concerns impact your ability to plan for and achieve long-term financial goals Having a strategy in place now helps you better manage future life events. The concept of relating life events to financial needs and financial strategies is nothing new. However, consider that many women arrive at these needs and decisions from a more emotional, value-driven perspective than an economic one.
  • Discover Journal: What values are most important to you and how you live your life? Anyone willing to share some of their values with the rest of us? (In case participants are not open to sharing, presenter should be prepared to share their own thoughts/feelings that might be typical examples. Attempt to demonstrate how women’s values will play a significant role in planning their financial future). The good news is that those feelings of financial insecurity don’t have to continue for you. You have the right to educate yourself and understand how to manage your money. I can help educate you - you don’t have to do it alone. We can work together to put a financial strategy in place and start to help put your mind at ease.
  • Here’s a quick look at some life events and how they may impact your financial security. College/career planning – as you get started in your profession, change jobs, go back to college, move up the career ladder, or begin planning to send your children to college, you want to make sure that you’re covered financially for these costs as well as any unexpected expenditures. Family – whether you’re moving in with your partner, getting married, or having your first child, changes in your family status mean changes in your financial needs and how you define “financial security”.
  • House and home – whether you’re buying your first home or downsizing to a condominium, you need the right financial strategies to help you purchase and protect the things you hold valuable. Starting a business – becoming self-employed or starting a business is a big step that brings new challenges and responsibilities. Financial security forms the basis for your business success.
  • Starting over – if you become divorced, widowed, or find yourself in an “empty nest,” changes to your family dynamics may involve challenges you didn’t originally plan for, and your financial strategies can change unexpectedly. Retirement – if you want to maintain your standard of living during retirement, you have to plan carefully. Social Security may not be enough. Making the right financial decisions now can have an enormous impact on the dynamics of your future.
  • Too many women wait until a life event happens before they ever take any action to put together a strategy or to address their needs. Be proactive instead of reactive. Let me help you create a financial strategy NOW to prepare for anticipated changing life events, and to help keep you on track when unexpected life events occur.
  • The final key reason why you need a financial strategy is a concept called “The Sandwich Generation.” If your are (or will be) a middle-aged woman faced with the responsibilities of raising your children and serving as a caregiver for your parents at the same time – you’re a member of what’s become known as “The Sandwich Generation”. This situation has become more common as average life expectancy increases and more women have children at older ages. The “sandwich generation” can create high levels of stress and negatively impact the ability to plan for long-term financial security. Establishing a financial strategy can help you prepare for any financial needs you might face with your parents, such as long-term care, while also covering needs for your children, like college planning. I can help you establish a financial strategy early on, and then help you modify it according to your changing financial goals as you move through different stages in your life.
  • In addition to establishing a financial strategy, what else can you do if you are in (or anticipate being in) this situation? Here are some other things you and I can do together to help reduce its emotional and financial impact: Set financial goals and re-evaluate them frequently. Put together a plan to manage your debt. Create a retirement plan Help you save for your children’s college expenses early on
  • Next – I can help you do some legacy planning with your parents to learn about their plans, such as: Passing on life lessons and values Distribution of personal possessions Distribution of financial assets Final wishes and directives Remember – you don’t have to tackle all of this alone. We can work together to establish your plans and put them into action.
  • Discovery Journal: What life events are you currently experiencing? Take a few moments to write those down. How are you feeling about that event? What challenges are you experiencing with that event that you were not prepared for? What life events do you foresee in the future?
  • Now that we’ve looked at some of the reasons why you need a financial strategy, you might be feeling a little overwhelmed. You might feel like putting a financial strategy into place sounds like a great idea, but it also sounds like a big undertaking. You might not feel like you can do it alone…who will help you? You can ease the planning process by getting the information and the support you need from a knowledgeable financial professional like me.
  • Think about this…Over 40% of women say that the lack of sufficient knowledge is the single-largest barrier to getting more involved in managing savings and investments. 9 Don’t let your own personal lack of financial knowledge keep you from reaching out to learn more about managing your money. You don’t have to be intimidated by money and investing. Learning how to manage your finances might be a different experience for you, but it doesn’t have to be hard. I can use my experience and expertise to help you. [CLICK] Besides helping you gain knowledge about managing your money, working with a knowledgeable financial professional like me can help you put your mind at ease. In fact, women who work with a financial professional feel 50% more responsible, confident, and optimistic. 9 [CLICK] Not to mention, women who work with a financial professional are 50% more likely to have more financial security, clarity, and satisfaction. 9 9 The Allianz Women, Money, and Power Study, 2006.
  • So, we’ve gone through some key reasons why you need a financial strategy. [CLICK] And we’ve covered some of the benefits working with a financial professional like me can provide for you. [CLICK] What’s the next step?
  • We need to work together to understand “who you are” in money matters; then work according to your needs. While most financial professionals will ask questions about your financial situation, many do not take the time to learn about the best way to work with you in developing your strategy. Here’s my approach to understanding “who you are” financially.
  • Most women fall into one of these 5 financial personalities: Financial Initiator Financial Analyzer Financial Collaborator Financial Avoider Financial Dreamer Let’s learn about the typical characteristics of each one.
  • You may be a “Financial Initiator” if you are self-assured, empowered, and optimistic are clear about your financial goal and how to achieve them take the initiative to work with a financial professional for information and guidance
  • You may be a “Financial Analyzer” if you have a good understanding of household finances, thoroughly researching investment opportunities and track financial results are a comparison shopper, an avid saver, and rarely purchase something you can’t afford have worked with a financial professional in the past
  • You may be a “Financial Collaborator” if you are in a relationship, you’re healthy, happy, and cooperative provide family financial comfort and stability share equally in financial decisions with your partner, including working with a financial professional
  • You may be a “Financial Avoider” if you are overwhelmed by all the financial choices available avoid taking steps to resolve financial problems due to lack of financial knowledge know you would benefit from seeking the help of a financial professional have trouble taking that first step
  • You may be a “Financial Dreamer” if you: are intimidated by money and investing feel helpless; hope someone will take care of your financial problems defer all financial matters to your partner If you are a “Financial Dreamer”, you may have the most to gain by consulting with a financial professional.
  • Discover Journal: Which of the five personalities do you most closely identify with? What qualities do you see in yourself?
  • Knowing your individual financial personality will help me better understand who you are in money matters and in turn, better understand your values, decision-making processes, and personal approach to planning for your financial future. This personal insight (beyond collecting your economic data) will enable me to provide information and direction that’s specifically suited to you and your needs. That’s “why” we do it. Now here’s “how” we do it.
  • We can easily determine your financial personality by your responses to the simple questions on this worksheet. We’ll score the responses to identify your financial personality – then review the results together for further discussion about your unique, individual needs and concerns. How well did your results match your response to Exercise 5 in your journal?
  • Now – it’s time to get started and that means preparing for your first meeting with me. Let’s discuss your preparation in three steps: Identify your most significant financial goals and concerns. Talk with your partner (if you have one) and invite them along. Complete the financial personality worksheet.
  • First, start by identifying your most significant financial goals and concerns. Write down your three most important financial goals. Write down your three biggest financial concerns. They can be anything. Maybe you want to buy a new house in 5 years. Maybe you’re trying to save money to send your child to college. Or, maybe you need to provide assisted living for your parents.
  • Discovery Journal: Exercise 6: Write down your three most important financial goals. Exercise 7: Write down your three biggest financial concerns.
  • Next. . . Invite your partner (if you have one) to the meeting and prepare together. But first . . . Be aware of the typically different perspectives between men and women. Here are some examples…
  • Women are inclined to take a more holistic approach to planning their financial future. Men are more likely to make quick decisions based on “hot” tips. Women generally feel burdened by the worries that go along with increasing responsibilities that require greater financial decisions. Men tend to see themselves as more analytical and open to taking greater financial risks. And while women perceive arguments about money as issues of power and control, men are more likely to attribute them to a lack of trust. Understanding these different perspectives can help you communicate better with your partner. You’ll have a better idea of where they’re coming from and why they hold certain opinions about developing a financial strategy.
  • Now . . . Try switching roles/perspectives in answering the two questions on financial goals and concerns. Identify your most important financial goals and concerns as a couple. While couples often share some of the same financial goals and concerns, it’s OK (and not uncommon) to have some individual differences. Discuss these and bring them to your meeting with me.
  • And finally – respond to the questions on the Financial Personality worksheet. Bring your completed worksheet to our meeting, and we can determine the best way to work together based on your financial personality.
  • In closing . . . We’ve learned “Why you need a strategy” and identified the benefits of working with a financial professional. Remember – “knowledge is power” and can help to overcome feelings of financial insecurity. We’ve considered the importance of “Understanding who you are financially” as a way to help me better serve your needs. And we’ve covered some tips on preparing for your first meeting with me as the first step in “getting started” to create your financial future.
  • The next step is to take control of your financial future today by scheduling a meeting with me. - (Explain how they can schedule a meeting before they leave the seminar; invite them to take action; no cost or obligation.) [Ask them to fill out the contact form and explain to them that question 6 & 7 will help you in knowing their goals and financial concerns before they get to the meeting with you.]
  • Q & A
  • (Closing comments; remind them how to schedule an appointment.) Discovery Journal: Fill out the contact form. Perf out and pass forward or hand into presenter. Your goals and concerns are on the back of the contact form. This will help me prepare for our meeting together. We will discuss your financial personality and also review your goals and concerns.

Transcript

  • 1. My Photo Album
  • 2. S tarting over Sammy sunning I always wanted to work with animals M y nestegg G ood times. H ard at it! P ouring over the books Retirement planning seminars … T he Kids – Before they “grew up” (not much has changed!) M om’s 70 th (weren’t they a great couple? C an you believe that hair?
  • 3.  
  • 4. Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America
  • 5. Financial Discovery Journal
  • 6. Agenda
      • Why you need a financial strategy
      • Understanding “who you are” financially
      • Getting started
  • 7. Why do you need a financial strategy?
        • Evolving roles and increased responsibilities
        • Feelings of financial insecurity
        • Life-changing events
        • The “Sandwich Generation”
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 8. Evolving roles
        • EDUCATION
        • Out of all college graduates in 2008, over 58% were women 1
        • Over half the women with business degrees out-earn their husbands 2
    1 U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics , 2008 annual. 2 Marti Barletta, “Marketing to Women”, January 2006. Why you need a financial strategy
  • 9. Evolving roles SOCIETY and ECONOMY
        • The percentage of women in the workforce almost doubled in the second-half of the last century 3
    32%
        • The number of women earning $100,000+ has quadrupled in the last decade 4
    $100,000 3 Department of Education, 2006 4 Marketing to Women , Marti Barletta, January 2006 Why you need a financial strategy 62%
  • 10. Increased responsibilities It’s projected that by 2010, 60% of all the wealth in the United States will be controlled by women 5 . 5 “The Guru of Retirement,” Wealth Manager , February, 2007. Why you need a financial strategy
  • 11.
    • 90% of all women will be solely responsible for their finances at some point in their lives 6
    istock photo #2125473 Increased responsibilities 6 Susan W. Sweetser, “Mining Gems,” Fall 2006 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 12. Exercise 1 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 13. Feeling financially insecure…
        • 90% of women say they feel somewhat financially insecure 7
    7 The Allianz Women, Money, and Power Study, 2006 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 14. Feeling financially insecure . . .
    • Lingering effects of traditional values:
        • Women weren’t typically educated on investing and finance
        • “ Well-prepared” vs. “marry well”
        • Not encouraged to seek careers in insurance or finance
    • Little has changed …
      • Only 18% of women teach their children about finances 8
    8 The Allianz Women, Money and Power Study, 2006 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 15. Exercise 2 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 16. Feeling financially insecure . . .
    • Lingering effects of traditional values:
        • Failure to recognize women as customers for financial products and services
        • Lack of articles and ads on money and investing
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 17. Life events
    • Each stage of life brings events that can
        • Reshape your financial needs and concerns
        • Impact your ability to plan for and achieve long-term goals
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 18. Exercise 3 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 19. Life events
      • College/career planning
        • Get started in your profession
        • Change jobs
        • Go back to college
        • Move up the career ladder
        • Send your children to college
      • Family
        • Moving in with your partner
        • Getting married
        • Having your first child
      • Make sure you are covered financially for unexpected expenditures
      • Changes in family status = changes in financial security needs
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 20. Life events
      • House and home
        • Buying your first home
        • Downsizing to a condominium
      • Starting a business
        • Becoming self-employed
        • Starting a business
      • The right financial strategies to help you purchase and protect the things you hold valuable
      • Financial security forms the basis for business success
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 21. Life events
      • Starting over
        • Divorcing
        • Become a widow
        • “ Empty Nester”
      • Retirement
        • Maintaining standard of living
        • Is Social Security enough?
      • Challenges you didn’t originally plan for or financial strategies change unexpectedly
      • The right decisions impact your financial future
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 22. Life events
    • Be proactive instead of reactive!
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 23. “ The Sandwich Generation”
        • Serving as caregivers to aging parents
        • Still raising children at home
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 24. The “Sandwich Generation”
      • If you find yourself in this situation:
        • Set financial goals and re-evaluate frequently
        • Manage your debt
        • Create a retirement strategy
        • Save for your children’s college expenses early on
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 25. The “Sandwich Generation”
      • Do some legacy planning with your parents to learn about their plans:
      • Passing on life lessons and values
      • Distribution of personal possessions
      • Distribution of financial assets
      • Final wishes and directives
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 26. Exercise 4 Why you need a financial strategy
  • 27.
    • Who will help me create a financial strategy?
    Why you need a financial strategy
  • 28. Knowledge is power
    • The experience and expertise of a financial professional is invaluable…
    50% 40% Lack of knowledge is greatest barrier 9 Feel more optimistic & confident 9 50% More likely to experience financial security 9 Why you need a financial strategy 9 The Allianz Women, Money and Power Study, 2006
  • 29. You need a strategy. 9 The Allianz Women, Money, and Power Study, 2006 Why you need a financial strategy Seek the help of a financial professional. What’s next?
  • 30. Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 31. Five financial personalities
        • Financial Initiator
        • Financial Analyzer
        • Financial Collaborator
        • Financial Avoider
        • Financial Dreamer
    Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 32. You may be a Financial Initiator if you
        • are self-assured, empowered and optimistic
        • are clear about your financial goals and how to achieve them
        • take the initiative to work with a financial professional for information and guidance
    Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 33. You may be a Financial Analyzer if you
        • have a good understanding of household finance
        • thoroughly research investment opportunities
        • are a comparison shopper, and an avid saver
        • have worked with a financial professional in the past
    Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 34. You may be a Financial Collaborator if you
        • are in a relationship, you’re healthy and cooperative
        • provide family financial support and stability
        • share equally in financial decisions with your partner
    Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 35. You may be a Financial Avoider if you
        • are overwhelmed by all the financial choices available
        • avoid taking steps to resolve financial problems due to lack of financial knowledge
        • know you would benefit from seeking the help of a financial professional
        • have trouble taking that first step
    Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 36. You may be a Financial Dreamer if you
        • are intimidated by money and investing
        • feel helpless; hope someone will take care of your financial problems
        • defer all financial matters to your partner
    Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 37. Exercise 5 Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 38. Why identify your financial personality? Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 39. Identifying your financial personality Understanding “who you are” financially
  • 40. Getting started . . . Tips for preparing to meet with your financial professional
    • Prepare for your first meeting with me:
    • Identify your most significant financial goals and concerns.
    • Talk with your partner; invite them along.
    • Complete the financial personality worksheet.
    Take control of your financial future today
  • 41. Getting started . . .
    • Identify your most significant financial goals and concerns.
        • Write down your three most important financial goals.
        • Write down your three biggest financial concerns.
    Getting started
  • 42. Exercise 6 & 7 Getting started
  • 43. Getting started . . .
    • Invite your partner to the meeting and prepare together.
    • Be aware of the typically different perspectives between men and women.
    • Identify your three most important financial goals and concerns as a couple.
    • Try switching roles/perspectives in answering the same two questions
    Getting started
  • 44. He said, she said
      • Radically different perspectives on financial matters
        • Men
          • Quick decisions based on “hot” tips
        • Women
          • Holistic approach to financial planning
          • Burdened with worries that go with financial decisions
          • See arguments on money as issues of power and control
          • See themselves as more analytical and open to risks
          • See arguments on money as a lack of trust
    Getting started
  • 45. Getting started . . .
    • Invite your partner to the meeting and prepare together.
    • Be aware of the typically different perspectives between men and women.
    • Try switching roles/perspectives in answering the two questions on financial goals and concerns.
    • Identify your most important financial goals and concerns as a couple.
    Getting started
  • 46. Getting started . . .
    • Financial Personality Worksheet:
    • Respond to the questions on the Financial Personality worksheet.
    • Bring the completed worksheet to our meeting.
    Getting started
  • 47. Closing summary . . .
      • Why you need a financial strategy
      • Understanding “who you are” financially
      • Getting started
  • 48. Take control of your financial future today
  • 49.
    • Questions?
  • 50.
    • Not FDIC insured • May lose value • No bank or credit union guarantee • Not a deposit • Not insured by any federal government or agency or NCUA/NCUSIF
    • www.allianzlife.com
    • Allianz Life Insurance Company of North America
    • [Financial Professional name]
    • [Contact information]
  • 51. Not FDIC Insured/ May lose Value/ No bank or credit union guarantee/ Not a deposit/ Not insured by any federal government agency or NCUA/NCUSIF