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Social Computing

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Presentatie Brian Kardon (Forrester Research) over Social Computing: The Impact Of Emerging Technology On Consumer Behavior And Marketing Strategy.

Presentatie Brian Kardon (Forrester Research) over Social Computing: The Impact Of Emerging Technology On Consumer Behavior And Marketing Strategy.

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  • This ia Better start for Social Computing.. http://noddychaspeaks.blogspot.in/2012/09/what-is-social-computing-easy-way.html
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  • Cloud Computing Magazine http://issuu.com/channelplanet/docs/cloudcomputingmagazine03
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  • Impressive presentation of ’Social Computing’. You’ve shown your credibility on presentation with this slideshow. This one deserves thumbs up. I’m John, owner of www.freeringtones.ws/ . Hope to see more quality slides from you.

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  • thanq its really nice along with helpful to me in thinking about innovation comes as well as think of which.... very nice work.... tanq for this.....
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Social Computing Social Computing Presentation Transcript

  •  
  • Brian Kardon Forrester Research November 30, 2006 Social Computing: The Impact Of Emerging Technology On Consumer Behavior And Marketing Strategy
  • Technology Changes Everything
    • Extended human life
    • Created near limitless educational opportunities
    • Facilitated the global economy
    • Produced wealth in excess of human norms
    The democratization of technology
  • Does Technology Change Business? Or Marketing?
    • Tower Records
    • Travel Agents
    • Newspapers
    • Polaroid
    • Blockbuster – NetFlix – On Demand
  • An Archeological Expedition …
  •  
  • Coke response: "It's an entertaining phenomenon ... [but] doesn't fit with the brand personality" of Diet Coke. Mentos response: “ We were really delighted by it, largely because we felt it reflected the personality of Mentos as a brand.” Mentos sales are up 14.5% to $27.2M from the beginning of the year to Sept. 10 [source, IRI] Can attribute this growth to several things, but they have “seen significant lift.”
  • Dell Had A Small Problem . . . . . . with flaming notebooks Osaka, Japan June 21, 2006
  • Dell’s Blog Gave It A Way To Talk To Customers
  • Can You Guess What This Curve Is? Source: Fortune Magazine, September 4, 2006
  • MySpace Is A Serious Player Source: Nielsen NetRatings, August 2006
  • Brands Extend Their Reach In Social Networks
  • In Teens' Web World, MySpace Is So Last Year
    • Social Sites Find Fickle Audience
    • By Yuki Noguchi
    • Washington Post Staff Writer Sunday, October 29, 2006
    • Teen Web sensation MySpace became so big so fast, News Corp. spent $580 million last year to buy it. Then Google Inc. struck a $900 million deal, primarily to advertise with it. But now Jackie Birnbaum and her fellow English classmates at Falls Church High School say they're over MySpace.
    • "I think it's definitely going down -- a lot of my friends have deleted their MySpaces and are more into Facebook now," said Birnbaum, a junior who spends more time on her Facebook profile, where she messages and shares photos with other students in her network.
    • From the other side of the classroom, E.J. Kim chimes in that in the past three months, she's gone from slaving over her MySpace profile up to four hours a day -- decorating it, posting notes and pictures to her friends' pages -- to deleting the whole thing.
  • Big Issues Originate From Small Sources
    • August 2005: AOL settles with NY state for $1.25 and agrees to reform customer service practices.
    • June 13, 2006: Vincent Ferrari blogs about trying to cancel his AOL account, including an audio recording of the experience.
    • June 20, 2006: Apology from AOL
    • June 21, 2006: Story on NBC’s Today show
    • July 2, 2006: Story runs in the New York Times
  • We’re Witnessing A Consumer Revolution
  • What’s Going On?
    • Web 2.0
    • Social Networking
    • User-generated Content (UGC)
    • Consumer-generated Media (CGM)
    • Power to the People
    • The Wisdom of Crowds
  • Agenda
    • What is Social Computing?
    • What is Social Computing’s impact on your company?
    • How can you take advantage of Social Computing?
  • Agenda
    • What is Social Computing?
    • What is Social Computing’s impact on your company?
    • How can you take advantage of Social Computing?
  • Definition: Social Computing
    • A social structure in which technology puts power in communities not institutions
  • Why?
    • Technologies are available that lower the cost for individuals to create and distribute content
    • There is increasing acceptance of information from ”non-authoritative” sources
    • PC usage > TV + radio + magazine usage
    • “In the future everyone will be famous for 15 people.”
  • Many Forms Of Social Computing Social Technology Examples Del.icio.us, flikr, digg Tagging Basecamp, wikipedia, Socialtext Wikis/Collaborative Software Podcast Alley, Odeo, Podshow Podcasts Froogle, Shopzilla, pricegrabber Comparison Shopping Sites eBay, craigslist, ubid C2C eCommerce TripAdvisor, ReviewCentre User Review Portals Google, Yahoo! MSN, AOL, Technorati Search Engines Gawker, TypePad, Weblogs.com Blogs Linux Apache Software Foundation Open Source Software NewsGater, Bloglines, MyYahoo! RSS myspace, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn Social Networks
  • The Marketer’s Five Stages Of Grief
    • Denial: “This is just techno geek stuff — it won’t last.”
    • Anger: “Who do these consumers think they are?”
    • Bargaining: “ If I give you some coupons, will you be happy?”
    • Depression: “Maybe I should have become an accountant.”
    • Acceptance: “I can’t stop the train, so I better get on.”
  • Peer-based Interactions Are Most Common … Source: NACTAS Q3 2006 Media & Marketing Online Survey Base: North American Online Consumers
  • Trust In Friends And Acquaintances Dominates Source: NACTAS Q3 2006 Media & Marketing Online Survey Base: North American Online Consumers
  • Theme Listen to, and nurture, individuals talking about your brand — even if you aren’t in control.
  • Our Beloved iPod …
  • Definition
    • Consumer-generated media is content created by individuals and consumed by individuals with or without sanction from institutions.
  • Trust In Peers Trashes Ads Recommendations from friends/family Ads on mobile phones Web banner ads Search engine ads Branded Web sites Ads in magazines Ads on radio Ads on TV Ads in newspapers Requested email updates Consumer opinions posted online 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% “ I trust:”
  • The Cable Guy
  • Agenda
    • What is Social Computing?
    • What is Social Computing’s impact on your company?
    • How can you take advantage of Social Computing?
  • What Is The Economic Value Of Social Computing?
    • Lower Product Development Costs
    • Lower Marketing Costs
    • Higher Margins – derived from a
    • community’s intrinsic value
    • Lower research costs
    • Higher sales…or fewer lost sales
  • Moving From Top-Down To Bottom-Up Innovation Traditional Innovation Customer-Driven Innovation Customers Executives Source of Inspiration Deep observation of customer needs Existing assets, products and positioning Key Drivers Spontaneous Structured Customer Involvement Invite customer in Go out to customers Corporate Posture Search, e-mail, blogs, comments Surveys, focus groups story boards Tools
  • Current TV Viewer Creates Ad For Sony
  •  
  • eBay Taps Community Knowledge With Wikis
  • Executive Blog: Boeing’s Vice President Of Marketing, Randy Baseler “ I hope it [the blog] will help solve one of my biggest frustrations — not being able to talk with everyone as often as I like about what’s going on in our industry and our company.”
  • Even Better Boeing Blog — 777 Flight Test Journal
  • Burpee Uses RSS To Build A Daily Relationship Adding reviews increased the CTR by 43% November sales increased by 4X
  • Agenda
    • What is Social Computing?
    • What is Social Computing’s impact on your company?
    • How can you take advantage of Social Computing?
  • Marketers Should Understand The Participation Pyramid Creators Critics Couch potatoes Collectors The participation pyramid
  • Age Is A Major Driver Base: North American online consumers Source: Forrester’s 2006 NACTAS Benchmark Survey potatoes Couch Collectors Critics Creators 3% 4% 5% 6% 9% Listen to podcasts 7% 12% 18% 25% 32% Watch Internet video 5% 7% 9% 14% 27% Read blogs 9% 12% 13% 22% 29% Use photo-sharing sites 2% 4% 6% 12% 37% Use social networking sites 1% 1% 2% 3% 4% Use RSS 6% 10% 12% 16% 17% Visit ratings sites 7% 10% 14% 21% 32% Visit discussion boards/chat rooms 3% 6% 7% 12% 22% Publish Web page 0% 1% 2% 4% 15% Publish blog Seniors (62+) Older Boomer (51-61) Younger Boomers (41-50) Gen X (27-40) Gen Y (18-26) Do monthly
  • How Can Companies Leverage Social Computing? Type Impact Action Observe
    • Customers are influenced by media they view that is not created by your company.
    Couch potatoes Engage
    • People reach out to other members of the community through posts, comments, etc.
    Collectors Contribute
    • People take the initiative to create and share media with others (sometimes about brands).
    Critics Lead
    • Some individuals become an alternative trusted source (brand) for your customers.
    Creators
  • Brands Will Continue To Be Highly Exposed
    • Customers will learn about your brand from individuals outside your influence.
    • Creative individuals will create media that will contribute to the shaping of your brand.
    • Popular individuals can become the definitive authority on your brand to some customers.
  • Getting Started
    • Decide how involved you will be with Social Computing
    • Map out what relationships you want to build
    • Listen to what is being said to find unmet needs
    • Participate in the conversations
  • Four Tactics To Navigate The Social Computing Phenomenon
    • Monitoring
      • Look to brand monitoring firms like Nielsen BuzzMetrics or Cymfony to collect and analyze data.
      • Maintain a quasi-team focused on locating and tracking blogs and other media about your brand.
      • Use simple tactics such as Google Alerts or other automated search notifications to track activity.
  • Four Tactics To Navigate The Social Computing Phenomenon
    • Participating
      • Identify the most highly used destinations of Social Computing for your brand — then join in and become a member.
      • Don’t hide your relationship to the brand — be open about who you are and why you’re there.
      • Listen to what people have to say, respond, and be honest with your commitments.
      • Consider sponsoring or advertising on the site as a show of support.
      • Be a content provider, not a marketer/advertiser.
  • Four Tactics To Navigate The Social Computing Phenomenon
    • Enabling
      • Evaluate your audience and products/services to determine whether enabling is the right move.
      • Look to vendors that provide platforms for accepting consumer-generated content
      • Open your mind to what you normally would allow or disallow — and don’t be overly controlling.
      • Don’t let the community die out — continue to participate and empower active individuals.
  • Four Tactics To Navigate The Social Computing Phenomenon
    • Leveraging
      • Consider selecting one or two popular individuals commenting on your brand to contribute to your marketing efforts.
      • Reward participation, even if they say things you don’t like — let them know you’re listening.
      • Continuously analyze what people are saying and respond with appropriate product and service changes — and thank them for the advice.
  • Summary
    • Social Computing is here to stay. Accept it.
    • Focus on the relationships, not the technologies
    • Get started using the tools – and start small
      • Monitor
      • Participate
      • Enable
      • Leverage
    • Embrace a culture of generosity in your Social Computing efforts
  • Best Practices In Social Computing
    • Be ready to act on feedback
    • Relationships can be messy — be prepared to make mistakes
    • Use existing marketing metrics to gauge your success
    • It’s a new mindset, so give yourself time
    • Develop a “culture of generosity”
  • Thank You Brian Kardon 617 613 6470 [email_address] www.forrester.com/mPlanet Entire contents © 2005 Forrester Research, Inc. All rights reserved.