Designpart2

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  • Designpart2

    1. 1. Design Continued form, function, and funkiness
    2. 2. This is Jackson “Jack the Dripper” Pollock standing in front of a huge (8‘X20’) blank canvas. He had just been commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim to paint a mural for her home.
    3. 3. This is Jackson “Jack the Dripper” Pollock standing in front of a huge (8‘X20’) blank canvas. He had just been commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim to paint a mural for her home. I love this image. The artist’s silhouette as blank as the canvas. Imagine what he is thinking. He has this huge opportunity to impress someone who could skyrocket his career....he’s probably thinking
    4. 4. This is Jackson “Jack the Dripper” Pollock standing in front of a huge (8‘X20’) blank canvas. He had just been commissioned by Peggy Guggenheim to paint a mural for her home. I love this image. The artist’s silhouette as blank as the canvas. Imagine what he is thinking. He has this huge opportunity to impress someone who could skyrocket his career....he’s probably thinking WTF am I going to do?
    5. 5. Well, actually he was pretty cocky so he probably didn’t think that exactly, anyway, here is what he ended up creating: Mural, 1943
    6. 6. Well, actually he was pretty cocky so he probably didn’t think that exactly, anyway, here is what he ended up creating: Mural, 1943
    7. 7. So lets analyze its formal properties. This means we are going to make observations of its form, composition, or the way it looks. What do we notice?
    8. 8. So lets analyze its formal properties. This means we are going to make observations of its form, composition, or the way it looks. What do we notice? •Note its format or shape of the canvas is horizontal or landscape.
    9. 9. So lets analyze its formal properties. This means we are going to make observations of its form, composition, or the way it looks. What do we notice? •Note its format or shape of the canvas is horizontal or landscape. •Note there are not any areas of focus, no points where our eyes tend to rest, they go all over .
    10. 10. So lets analyze its formal properties. This means we are going to make observations of its form, composition, or the way it looks. What do we notice? •Note its format or shape of the canvas is horizontal or landscape. •Note there are not any areas of focus, no points where our eyes tend to rest, they go all over . •Notice how the elements in the painting are not contained within it, they are cropped at the edges which allows us to imagine them continuing outside the frame.
    11. 11. So lets analyze its formal properties. This means we are going to make observations of its form, composition, or the way it looks. What do we notice? •Note its format or shape of the canvas is horizontal or landscape. •Note there are not any areas of focus, no points where our eyes tend to rest, they go all over . •Notice how the elements in the painting are not contained within it, they are cropped at the edges which allows us to imagine them continuing outside the frame. •The composition is unified (everything goes together well) because of repetition of colors, shapes, and qualities of lines. But there is enough variety to keep things dynamic.
    12. 12. So lets analyze its formal properties. This means we are going to make observations of its form, composition, or the way it looks. What do we notice? •Note its format or shape of the canvas is horizontal or landscape. •Note there are not any areas of focus, no points where our eyes tend to rest, they go all over . •Notice how the elements in the painting are not contained within it, they are cropped at the edges which allows us to imagine them continuing outside the frame. •The composition is unified (everything goes together well) because of repetition of colors, shapes, and qualities of lines. But there is enough variety to keep things dynamic. •There is a good balance of negative space (white shapes) and positive marks.
    13. 13. And there are several other formal observations we can make, But what does all this mean? Why take the time to analyze it in these formal terms?
    14. 14. And there are several other formal observations we can make, But what does all this mean? Why take the time to analyze it in these formal terms? Well, the form of something, abstract or not, helps to determine how we feel when we look at it.
    15. 15. And there are several other formal observations we can make, But what does all this mean? Why take the time to analyze it in these formal terms? Well, the form of something, abstract or not, helps to determine how we feel when we look at it. A horizontal format has a different feel than a vertical one. A compositional focal point allows the viewers eye to rest, makes us see something as important, something deserving attention.
    16. 16. And there are several other formal observations we can make, But what does all this mean? Why take the time to analyze it in these formal terms? Well, the form of something, abstract or not, helps to determine how we feel when we look at it. A horizontal format has a different feel than a vertical one. A compositional focal point allows the viewers eye to rest, makes us see something as important, something deserving attention. An allover composition like Mural makes us see the whole canvas as one thing.
    17. 17. And there are several other formal observations we can make, But what does all this mean? Why take the time to analyze it in these formal terms? Well, the form of something, abstract or not, helps to determine how we feel when we look at it. A horizontal format has a different feel than a vertical one. A compositional focal point allows the viewers eye to rest, makes us see something as important, something deserving attention. An allover composition like Mural makes us see the whole canvas as one thing. And of course, a design with controlled chaos has a much different feel than one with highly organized and similar elements.
    18. 18. So, if Pollock wanted the viewer of Mural to feel something (and most abstract artists do), he had to control (either consciously or not) all the formal elements in a way that creates the desired effect.
    19. 19. So, if Pollock wanted the viewer of Mural to feel something (and most abstract artists do), he had to control (either consciously or not) all the formal elements in a way that creates the desired effect. An advertising designer must think in a similar way for a different sort of effect (to get the viewer to notice and desire the product)
    20. 20. So, if Pollock wanted the viewer of Mural to feel something (and most abstract artists do), he had to control (either consciously or not) all the formal elements in a way that creates the desired effect. An advertising designer must think in a similar way for a different sort of effect (to get the viewer to notice and desire the product)
    21. 21. So, if Pollock wanted the viewer of Mural to feel something (and most abstract artists do), he had to control (either consciously or not) all the formal elements in a way that creates the desired effect. An advertising designer must think in a similar way for a different sort of effect (to get the viewer to notice and desire the product) Both Pollock and Don Draper are interested in controlling what and how the viewer sees, and how they feel.
    22. 22. So, if Pollock wanted the viewer of Mural to feel something (and most abstract artists do), he had to control (either consciously or not) all the formal elements in a way that creates the desired effect. An advertising designer must think in a similar way for a different sort of effect (to get the viewer to notice and desire the product) Both Pollock and Don Draper are interested in controlling what and how the viewer sees, and how they feel. yes, I know Don Draper is not real!
    23. 23. BUT WHERE DID THIS ALL COME FROM?
    24. 24. BUT WHERE DID THIS ALL COME FROM? you may ask.
    25. 25. Answer: The Bauhaus The Bauhaus was a pre-WW2 art and design school in Germany. The concepts that came out of it greatly influenced design and art in the 20th century (esp before 1960) AND the way it is taught in school.
    26. 26. The teachers were artists like Wassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, Joseph Albers, and Paul Klee.
    27. 27. They believed in the idea that all humans see the same way no matter where they are from, and that they could create forms that represented some idealized, universal abstract purity. They also compartmentalized the different mediums (a painting is distinct from a sculpture for example).
    28. 28. They believed in the idea that all humans see the same way no matter where they are from, and that they could create forms that represented some idealized, universal abstract purity. They also compartmentalized the different mediums (a painting is distinct from a sculpture for example). So, in their art, and in the classes they taught, they “broke it down”.
    29. 29. Now, their idea that all humans perceive things the same way did not come from nowhere. Psychologists at the turn of the 20th century developed Gestalt theory, which describes how we all perceive visual information.
    30. 30. Now, their idea that all humans perceive things the same way did not come from nowhere. Psychologists at the turn of the 20th century developed Gestalt theory, which describes how we all perceive visual information. How is it we see the disparate parts as a whole thing. Why are we able to differentiate between the figure and the ground?
    31. 31. Now, their idea that all humans perceive things the same way did not come from nowhere. Psychologists at the turn of the 20th century developed Gestalt theory, which describes how we all perceive visual information. How is it we see the disparate parts as a whole thing. Why are we able to differentiate between the figure and the ground? Basically, we (and many other animals) developed these skills for survival
    32. 32. There are different versions of this, but this is basically how the Bauhaus folks broke it down.
    33. 33. There are different versions of this, but this is basically how the Bauhaus folks broke it down. First they said that, in art and design, there are 7 basic elements or ingredients: 1.Point 2.Line 3.Shape 4.Value 5.Space 6.Texture 7.Color
    34. 34. And they said there are 7 basic ways one could use those elements in order to create a unified (that was the goal) design, these are the Principles of design: 1.Repetition 2.Balance 3.Rhythm 4.Emphasis 5.Contrast 6.Direction 7.Proportion
    35. 35. For better or worse, these elements and principles have been codified into our thinking about form (and more importantly for you) in how art and design is taught in schools. typical 2d design assignment examples:
    36. 36. The thing is, although these concepts are wonderful for making nice looking design, its no longer relevant to look at only these things as foundational, Since the 60s, many other concepts have been important in art and design. Unity is no longer the only goal; hybridity, fragmentation, appropriation, social issues, pop culture, multiculturalism, and more became more important.
    37. 37. So, in this class, one of the goals for you is to determine what are the foundations and principles of art that are important and relevant to you and your generation. And understand that those can change over time.
    38. 38. So, in this class, one of the goals for you is to determine what are the foundations and principles of art that are important and relevant to you and your generation. And understand that those can change over time. BUT, before you start to think about that I still want you to have a mastery of those original elements and principles because they are still important as tools in creating meaning. Mastery of form is crucial in developing sophisticated ways to present content.
    39. 39. So for homework, I want you to research the definitions of those terms (the 7 elements and the 7 principles), write the definitions down in your sketchbook beside 2 examples of each. (look at those websites from the first slideshow, take your own images, or find them elsewhere) They should just be separate images that “foreground” each concept. For example, in this image: the element of line is foregrounded (meaning its the most prominent thing). Most images have several different elements and principles but your goal is to find or make ones that are clear examples of dominance. These will be due in 2 weeks. Have fun.

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