Mentoring network for equal opportunities handbook
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  • 1. PROJECT Mentoring Network forMentoring Network for Equal Opportunities(M-NET EOP) Equal Opportunities (M-NET EOP) Project Number: 2009-1-TR1-LEO05-08675 Engellilere Eþit Ýþ Fýrsatlarý Ýçin Danýþmanlýk AðýLEONARDO DA VINCI Programme, European Commission, Transfer of Innovation www.mneteop.eu CONTACTS Kocaeli Metropolitan Municipality, TURKEY EU and Foreign Affairs Department Karabas Mah. Oramiral Salim Dervisoglu Cad. No:80 Izmit/KOCAELI Tel: +90 262 318 16 43 / Fax: +90 262 318 16 31 e-mail: foreign@kocaeli.bel.tr Web: www.kocaeli.bel.tr MENTORING and WORK EXPERIENCE MANUAL Existing Mentoring Programmes Implemented Throughout Europe, USA, Australia
  • 2. CoordinatorCoordinator: Kocaeli Metropolitan Municipality/EU and Foreign AffairsAddress: Karabaþ Mah. Oramiral Salim Derviþoðlu Cad. No: 80 Kocaeli/TURKEYTelephone: 0 262 318 16 43 Fax: 0 262 318 16 31Web: www.kocaeli.bel.tr E-Mail: foreign@kocaeli.bel.tr Partners Partners Address Tel / Fax / E-MailMarie Curie Association 31 Osvobozhdenie Str., 00359 32 62 21 28/00359 32 Plovdiv 4023, Bulgaria 62 88 90 info@marie-curie-bg.org www.marie-curie-bg.orgCv2, Djurslands Cv2 N.P Josiassens Vej 44 0045 87 58 04 54Erhvervsskoler 8500 Grenaa, Danimarka jh@cv2.dk www.cv2.dk FEPAMIC Federación Provincial 00349 577 677 00/00349 577FEPAMIC de Minusválidos Físicos y 679 64 Orgánicos de Córdoba fhenares.proyectos@fepamic.org C/ María Montessori, s/n, www.fepamic.org 14011, CórdobaGülen Yüzler Sanayi Mahallesi Hayrettin 0090 262 335 15 88/0090 262 Uzun Caddesi Ýzmit/KOCAELÝ 335 41 86 muratuzar@beldeas.com www.beldeas.comYerel-Sen Sanayi Fuarý 6. Cd. Hisar Sk. 0090 262 318 16 42/0090 262 No:10 Gölkenarý - Fuaralaný 318 16 06 Ýzmit / KOCAELÝ www.yerelsen.org.tr
  • 3. COPYRIGHT DECLARATIONThe preparation of the Mentoring and Work Experience Manual led byMarie Cruie Association on behalf of the Mentoring Network for EqualOpportunities project. Report on the Existing Mentoring Programmes Implemented throughout Europe, the USA, and AustraliaCopyright over it it held jointly by the partners in the M-NET EOP Project.This Leonardo da Vinci project 2009-TR1-1-LEO05-08675 has an overallcommitment to the widest exploitation of its results and so we activelyencourage the widest possible use of this Mentoring and Work ExperienceManual. Contents Page INTRODUCTION 5Readers of the Mentoring and Work Experience Manual are welcome to use Mentoring in general 6short quotations from it without informing the authors, but it is obligatory European Mentoring Practices 8to give full recognition of the source for any such quotations. For any longer American Mentoring Practices 23extracts, or reproduction of the overall document, users must seek Australian Mentoring Practices 27 Conclusion 28permission in advance from the project promoter, Maria Goranova- Appendix 1 Project titles and web - addresses 30Valkova, of the Marie Curie Association (goranova@marie-curie-bg.org)Users are welcome to draw upon the Mentoring and Work Experince Version Date Comment Author(s)Manual in the development and management of mentoring programmes,subject to the requirement that they fully acknowledge its source and that 1.0 February Final version Petya Grudeva,they inform the project promoter about their plans. 16, 2010 for approval Silviya Vaysilova 2.0 February Revised MariyaIn the shared interest of improving the quality of developments in this field 20, 2010 version Goranova-it is hoped that users will provide the project promoter with a short report Valkovaof their work. This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 4. INTRODUCTIONA quick desk research in Internet shows that the number of mentoringschemes applied by various organisations is slowly but significantlyincreasing, especially in the last decade. The present report contains anoverview of the good practices in mentoring.This selection of mentoring schemes is based on an internet search forrelevant models. It is inevitably biased towards examples available inEnglish. Most of the mentoring programmes collected in this report havesome presence at the European level. However, there are severalmentoring schemes that are exclusively American and one that isAustralian. They are included because they provide useful examples andinsights into important issues and through some adjustments they can betransformed and referred to the needs of people with disabilities.The aims of this report are to help readers to gain a full picture of thementoring concept, key characteristics and functions. It will also provideyou with examples of good mentoring practices carried out either withintransnational projects or as separate initiatives of different organisations.Some of them concern mentoring of people with disabilities and the othersdescribe mentoring schemes where the involved mentees are people whoneed additional training or support to improve their personal attributesand professional skills. These programmes provide suitable exampleswhich could be easily adjusted and used by mentoring promoters to meetthe needs of people with disabilities.The present report includes examples of face to face mentoringrelationships as well as the description of the so called online mentoringrun mainly in the USA. The summaries of the mentoring programmespresented herein have been prepared purely for the purpose of this reportand the features highlighted reflect this. Readers wishing to obtain acomprehensive understanding of the initiatives covered should go directlyto the relevant websites (see Appendix 1). The examples of the mentoringschemes should not be relied upon for this purpose.This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 5support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commissioncannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 5. Mentoring in general They are together responsible for monitoring the progress of the relationship, the extent to which it achieves its objectives and The concept of mentoring is getting more and more popular among the deciding on any adjustments that may be needed to the initial experts dealing with Human Resources development but it is still unfamiliar plans. in some countries such as Croatia, Macedonia, Lithuania, Estonia, Turkey, and others. Mentoring is essentially confidential between the mentee and the mentor and the core of their joint work should normally remain Traditionally, mentoring is the long term relationship of support, guidance the property of the two people involved. and advice. When held in the workplace a more experienced colleague uses their greater knowledge and understanding of the work process and tasks Although mentoring becomes increasingly popular tool for personal in order to support the development of a junior, inexperienced, or development it is not uncommon for it to be confused with other processes disadvantaged member of staff. This comes from the Greek myth where of training and development. For example, it is most frequently confused Odysseus entrusts the education of his son to his friend Mentor. It is also a with the coaching process. form of apprenticeship, whereby an inexperienced learner learns the Broadly speaking, the CIPD (Chartered Institute for Personnel and "tricks of the trade" from an experienced colleague. Development)2 defines coaching as developing a persons skills and The team of experts involved in Validation of Mentoring project1 outlined knowledge so that their job performance improves, hopefully leading to the key features of mentoring tailored to people with disabilities. They the achievement of organisational objectives. It targets high performance found that mentoring may be concerned with a mixed range of social and and improvement at work, although it may also have an impact on an career development. However, despite differences between individual individuals private life. It usually lasts for a short period and focuses on schemes, it normally has the following key characteristics: specific skills and goals. Mentoring is a relationship involving two people, the mentor and The following table, adapted by CIPD, highlights the differences between the mentee. mentoring and coaching. It is separate and distinct from coaching, but The mentor will have more experience of relevant areas than the coaching and mentoring can often overlap. mentee and one important aspect of mentoring is to enable the mentee to benefit from the knowledge and expertise of the mentor. Mentoring Coaching However, the relationship is essentially one where power is shared Ongoing relationship that can last for a long time Relationship generally has a short duration between two people, the mentee and the mentor. Among some of the important aspects of this are the following: Can be more informal and meetings can take place Generally more structured in nature and as and when the mentored individual needs some meetings scheduled on a regular basis Participation is voluntary for both mentee and mentor and either guidance and or support can withdraw at any time. More long term and takes a broader view of the Short-term (sometimes time bounded) and The two of them must develop together the agreement that person. Often known as the mentee but the term focused on specific development areas/issues governs their relationship, specifies the practical commitment that client or mentored person can be used each has engaged in and identifies the intended outcome of the mentoring process.6This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 7 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 6. Mentor usually passes on experience and is normally Not generally performed on basis that coach In most cases the mentoring couples meetings were held once a week. more senior in organisation needs direct experience of clients formal However, there were several who used to meet every day, and others, who occupational role met each other 2-3 times a week. The meetings were carried out in the The focus is on career and personal development Focus generally on development/issues at work mentors workplaces and one of the couples visited mentors patients in their homes. Agenda is set by the mentored person with the Agenda focused on achieving specific, immediate mentor providing support and guidance to prepare goals them for future roles The meetings were predominantly concerned with practical activities, according to the opinions shown in the evaluation forms. The earlier Revolves more around developing the mentee Revolves more around specific development sessions were concentrated on gaining knowledge and key skills. professionally areas/issues All mentoring couples worked together in accordance with a mutually I. European Mentoring Practices elaborated development plan. During the process there was a possibility for revision and actualisation of the Work plan and 25% of the couples used 1. Mentoring in the framework of Validation of Mentoring it. project After the end of the mentoring programme all mentors agreed that they felt Validating Mentoring is 2005 project within which three mentoring comfortable in the presence of their mentees, regardless of the fact that programmes in Bulgaria, Romania and Slovenia were set up. Those the majority of them had had no previous experience with people with programmes built on the experience gained from a previous project in the disabilities. 50% of the mentors agreed that they had not had any serious Leonardo da Vinci Programme – “Equal Employment Opportunities, inconveniences during the process. A few of the mentors mentioned that Mentoring and Training for Disabled people and Employers” where the they had some challenges in communication, due to speech impediments European partners from Bulgaria, Greece and the UK elaborated a of their mentees and 25% declared difficulties caused by lack of motivation mentoring scheme connecting young disabled final year students and for systematic work on behalf of the mentee. recent graduates, still unemployed to a mentor, occupied both in position After the end of the process all mentors agreed that they found the and industry preferred by the mentee. Employers network bringing programme easy to use, both at their organizations and in other together employers positive towards people with disabilities was also institutions in the country. Based on their experience as mentors, they established within VM project. defined some of the advantages of the mentoring programme: The mentoring programmes in the three above mentioned countries involved as mentees less experienced people with disabilities and people an option for people with disabilities to gain skills useful for their at risk of exclusion from the labour market. access to the labor market; a possibility for people with disabilities to have an “inside view” of Mentoring in Bulgaria their desired profession, and with the help of their mentor to better Eight mentoring couples were involved in the mentoring programme in orientate themselves towards their duties and responsibilities; Sliven, Bulgaria. One of them finished the process two months before its a chance for people with disabilities to receive good background on end due to health problem of the mentee. the real working process;8This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 9 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 7. an opportunity for people with disabilities to receive support and to tees found part-time jobs for accessories-making and packing. Beyond the feel more self-confident. quantitative results, all mentees raised their quality of life – they received access to socialization, found new friends and enriched their experience. The main recommendation of the mentors was an extension of the programme duration. Mentoring in Slovenia The main project activity of Šent – Slovenian Association for Mental Health After the end of the mentoring process, all mentees shared their and Dobrovita Plus Ltd. was implementation of piloting mentoring satisfaction with the results of their mutual work with the mentors. In their programmes; their target group was people with mental health problems. comments they also pointed out the personal characteristics and the Initially, they had formed six mentoring pairs, however two pairs quit the positive attitude of their mentors as crucial qualities which helped them to programmes very soon so they finished the mentoring programme with feel at ease during the whole duration of the programme. As a whole, the four successful pairs overall. mentees experienced no substantial challenges while being mentored. After the end of the piloting programme the Slovenian partner found the In their final evaluations of the programme the mentees said that their implementation of mentoring in their target group rather challenging, initial expectations were fully met. Some of the real benefits for them were: mostly due to the very nature of mental disorders. Although they sought to raised self-confidence and self-esteem; choose psychically stable and interested individuals, periodical crises could renewed willingness for job-placement and studying; not be avoided in certain cases. Therefore, they believed that prior to acquisition of knowledge and practical skills, a chance for launching the mentoring programme, mentors should be provided with professional realization; adequate information concerning various dimensions of mental health an opportunity to express themselves; problems. It is highly recommended that mentors become more and more sensitive towards individuals with mental health problems, yet at the same a chance to consider themselves a complete person. time they need to demonstrate a high degree of assertiveness in order to avoid potential manipulations on behalf of mentees which are likely to take The majority of the mentees had no recommendations for the place. improvement of the mentoring programme. Three of them declared their wishes for more practically-orientated training programmes, tailored to With regard to the responses provided by both mentors and mentees, people with disabilities. All mentees considered mentoring fully applicable through evaluation questionnaires and several informal talks, one can in Bulgaria and very positive for the integration of disabled people into generally conclude that non-formal learning is an appropriate learning society. method in the case of our target group. Thus, Mentees assessed the mentoring programme as beneficial in terms of acquisition of knowledge In accordance with the quantitative parameters discussed above, it could and practical experience which prevailed during the meetings with their be said that thanks to the mentoring, four of the participants with mentors. The mentees reported they felt comfortable with their respective disabilities changed their lives completely. Two of them found permanent mentors, who responded to their requirements and were appropriate for jobs – at a foundation supporting disadvantaged people and in a factory for the mutual fulfillment of the development plan. Even though they production of pastry. The other two of the mentees found part-time jobs for encountered certain challenges during the mentoring programme (such as accessories-making and packing. Beyond the quantitative results, all men- problems with motivation or difficulties related to the lack of basic knowledge10This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 11 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 8. of the mentoring subject matter), generally mentees considered the gular meetings for these couples in their training center in the city center of mentoring programme applicable in Slovenia. They also affirmed that Bucharest. All the mentees were disabled (different kind of disabilities) and mentoring is a useful tool for improving the integration of disabled people unemployed. The mentors were coming from different job fields: a web into society and that mentoring programmes are beneficiary for both designer, a Marketing Manager, a Human Resource specialist, a participating parties. Mentees were mostly satisfied with the way in which photographer, an advocate, a teacher, and an engineer. they were prepared for participation in the mentoring programme by the members of the project team. During the meetings they did specific job activities using informal and non- formal training: they made photographs, wrote different articles, used Similarly, mentors stressed that acquisition of practical experience was some computer programs, made easy translation Romanian-English- both the focal point and the benefit of the mentoring programme. They Romanian, learnt how to find a job on Internet and how to apply for a job on confirmed became familiar with mentees professional abilities, knowledge Internet, how to write a CV and how they can be prepared for interviews, and skills, crucial for the efficient mentoring process. They also mentioned etc. All these activities correlated with the mentoring project and were different challenges and difficulties they encountered during the focused on the mentees needs and desires. One of our mentees was programme (for example a case of low responsiveness on behalf of one contacted by IBM Romania to be employed there after she finishes the mentee, and a short psychical crisis undergone by another); however, it did University in the summer. not crucially affect the mentoring programme as a whole. Although only one mentor explicitly stated that the mentoring scheme is an adequate During these meetings the mentors faced some challenges with the model of learning, they all confirmed that the mentoring process is a useful mentees with speech difficulties. tool for improving integration of disabled people into society, that the The Validation of Mentoring project helped the mentees to focus on their results of mentoring programmes are beneficiary for both parties and that skills for job hunting (they learnt different ways to find a job, to increase they were properly prepared for participation in the mentoring by the members of the project team. their self-confidence and strengthen their relation with the mentors). Two mentees found a job soon after they were mentored. Although only one of them was employed within the professional field in which he was 2. The mentoring within VOCA2 project trained during the mentoring programme, it is important to take into Fourteen partners from seven different European countries formed a account the collateral positive effects of the mentoring process that reach partnership to develop the VOCA2 2006 project, supported by the beyond the narrow benefits of occupational training. These positive effects Leonardo strand of the European Union, to find ways of integrating disabled include acquisition of life and social skills which enable mentees to function people into the labour market. The partnership built on the VOCA Europe effectively in different social and/or working environments. project which developed flexible vocational training materials to allow disabled people to acquire vocational qualifications in a manner and at a Mentoring in Romania pace to suit them and their circumstances. The Validation of Mentoring project gave to Romanian mentees the opportunities to valorize their knowledge and skills. Much else had been done to ensure that people with disabilities have access to vocational training and support in securing work. But these jobs The Romanian partner formed 8 mentoring couples and they organized re- were often short-lived as both the disabled and their employers experience12This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 13 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 9. difficulties they had not anticipated. The VOCA2 project aimed at ted parties working in relevant government departments, non- facilitating a structured assessment of the potential employee and the tasks governmental, labour and voluntary organisations so that the mentors in they would be required to do as well as the intended workplace, so that training can benefit from as wide a range of informants as possible. These such difficulties could be foreseen and overcome. learning communities were being developed online and were linked by one over-arching community portal in English. The chosen approach was mentoring. Each disabled person had a mentor who could assess the needs of both the potential employee and the 3. The mentoring within Access to Professional Training (APT) workplace. The mentor would then work with both parties to find solutions project to anticipated challenges. The mentoring relationship would continue until The duration of the APT project was 24 months (October 2005 – September the disabled employee and their employer were both satisfied with the 2007); it was financially supported by the “Leonardo da Vinci” programme outcome. A key aspect of the mentoring approach was that the mentee, the of the European Commission. It developed and implemented an innovative disabled person, would be in an egalitarian relationship with their mentor. mentoring programme, based on the so called “blended learning” Such support should result in more permanent employment for disabled approach. This approach includes a combination of various techniques and people. practices to increase the effectiveness of the learning process. Alongside conventional and online teaching, the experience of mentoring provided a The VOCA2 project built on existing mentoring courses to develop one valuable support for the students acquisition of learning skills, academic especially tailored to this situation. This template course was adapted to knowledge and overall competence. cater for the different legislative and cultural backgrounds applying in each of the seven partner countries. These tailored courses were then piloted in The mentoring program planned in the APT project included another all seven project partner countries and best practices established and innovative element, concerning the nature of the mentor. In this case he/she was not an employed person with richer working and life disseminated in a handbook and many other channels such as experience, but a colleague – a co-student from upper level, but of course Communities of Practice, conferences and articles. The VOCA2 project then within the same overall programme as the mentee. worked to make the resultant mentor training course officially recognised As clarified above, the mentoring program was implemented within the by the authorities in the partner countries. academic community in universities and colleges. In this way the project The added value from the VOCA2 project lay both in the mentor training aimed at contributing to the involvement of disabled students in education approach and in the competence assessment tools which the mentors were and professional training, to make it more accessible and to make their stay trained to apply to the job placements of their mentees. in the educational institution much easier. The mentor training approach transfered the elements of accessibility and 4. The mentoring within Empowering Employees to Manage flexibility developed in the VOCA Europe materials since the mentors may their Outplacement Process (EMOP) project themselves be disabled. It was built on social constructivist principles of The target groups of EMOP 2003 project were vocational counsellors, learning. This means that the training was built on guided dialogue unemployed, and human resources experts. between trainers and peers as well as amongst peers so that the potential mentors learn as much from each other as from their trainers. The The project centred on the development of a counselling concept for definition of peers extends beyond the training cohort to include all interes- workers who have become unemployed owing to outplacement and who14This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 15 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 10. need to reskill. In the past, firms offered outplacement counselling only for 6. The mentoring within Peer Mentor Support Project senior staff or management. No counselling was available for young people The Peer Mentor Support 2002 project aimed at providing a peer who were not taken on following completion of their training or for mentoring service to support excluded or marginalised young people in ordinary workers, employees or middle-ranking workers. The reason for their attempts to gain access to training, education or employment. this was the high cost of the one-to-one counselling of staff. The project Building upon the developments of a previously funded Leonardo da Vinci sought to test an Internet-based mentoring system offering support for project (Peer Educator Training or PET), this project piloted the use of Peer those affected that would follow up their counselling interviews. Help was Mentors, working with specific target groups, and evaluated the efficiency provided via online counselling, exchanges with other persons affected and of this method as a tool for the successful (re)integration of the target by psychological support. As an additional measure there were job forums groups into vocational training and employment. The project closely and links to placement services. The Internet platform would initially cover worked with representatives of all the relevant agencies (including the construction industry and the metalworking industry in eight employers) who were or should have been involved with the target groups participating countries, where it was tested and subsequently transferred efforts to live productive and independent lives. Through a process of to other sectors. The final products were made available to counsellors and individual action planning, in which the young person played a major role, mentors along with companies and associations affected by the cuts in jobs supported by a Peer Mentor, the agencies would identify what an individual and the resultant redundancy of workers. young person needs to be able to access training and employment, be it housing, education, training or other support. Each partner in the project identified a group of 12-15 young persons currently suffering exclusion or 5. The mentoring within Women in Job Creation (WO-JOB) likely to be subject to exclusion from vocational training programmes as a project result of their particular needs (offenders, people with physical or learning The WO-JOB 2003 project was coordinated by TALETE SOC COOP ARL. It disabilities), volunteers were then recruited to work as mentors to a group aimed at implementing a model for female entrepreneurship based upon of 2-3 individual mentees. In the longer-term, these young people existing best practice. The project developed an on-line training tool related to job creation and targeted directly to women. Following an initial themselves would be encouraged to train as mentors for other survey, examples of existing best practice were gathered, analysed and disadvantaged young people, providing an appropriate role model to them. used as a basis for the development of the on-line training tool. This Open and Distance Learning (ODL) model was supported through the The outcomes of the project coordinated by Coleg Gorseinon College introduction of a mentoring service, particularly during the more strategic comprised: a report detailing the Peer Mentor System (including a study of phases of the training (organisational planning, implementation of the its effectiveness as a means of supporting young people from a range of business plan). A user-group of end beneficiaries (women) and selected different target groups in different geographic locations); the production of training experts piloted the developed training module. The end results of the previously developed PET Training Pack in electronic form (CD-Rom or the project included a publication on the "collection and analysis of existing internet) and in a variety of languages; the production of a Peer Mentor best practice", the on-line training course and a supporting user guide, and Training and Support Pack able to be used to develop and deliver Peer a dedicated project website. The primary beneficiaries of the project will be Mentor programmes across a range of situations and with a range of target potential female entrepreneurs and experts in vocational training. groups with indicators as regards potential accreditation for the pack.16This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 17 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 11. 7. Mentoring within Empowerment through Mentoring to National Mentoring Consortium. Students under-represented in higher Promote the Importance of Real Work Experience (EMPIRE) education are eligible to apply to the Brunel Widening Participation Mentoring Programme for Widening Participation students. These project EMPIRE is 2008 LLP project. It introduces blended-mentoring as a new programmes aim to help students with the transition into work. concept of quality person-based career development practice. EMPIRE takes traditional mentoring practices and blends them with the latest National Mentoring Consortium (NMC) – Programme 1 technological advancements. Web-based mentoring makes interaction Brunel University has been successfully running the NMC programme for easier, more frequent and less expensive. over six years. NMC is a national programme that is based at the University EMPIRE will identify and test “blended” mentoring (mix of on-site and of East London. Students are matched to professional mentors within from online events) schemes to give career counselling and development the public and private sector who meet with them monthly to discuss and services the opportunity to adopt mentoring in their ordinary practice set goals around careers, job searching, applications, interview techniques without the high cost related to a service totally based on one-to-one as well as building confidence in skills. mentoring. Furthermore the promotion of blended mentoring will contribute to prevent mentoring programmes fail due to time and location Widening Participation Mentoring - Programme 2 restraints. Professional Mentoring Programmes were established at Brunel for Career advice and guidance services are among the most important students from widening participation backgrounds following the success of institutions for the early identification of skill needs especially for those The National Mentoring Consortium programme. most likely to become long-term unemployed as well as for clients with high qualification and skills profiles. Especially a more personalized advice can The Programme links undergraduate students to professional mentors who enhance the employability of job-seekers and improve career support them in the transition from University to work and aims to development. EMPIRE wants to make career development a more encourage students to gain graduate level employment. collaborative service by tying up closer links between career guidance The programme provides employers with a rewarding opportunity to services and employers associations and enterprises. Starting from a series contribute to the career and personal development of Brunel students, of focus groups, the project partners will lay down the base for the piloting of tailored blended-mentoring schemes to be run with different target- whilst developing their own professional skills and building links with a groups. A mentoring kit will be prepared to equip mentors with basic leading university. mentoring tools. The final piloting phase (partly based on an on-line support service) with mentees (i.e. the customers of career counselling 9. The model of Mentoring and Befriending Foundation services) will produce several Career/professional plans and a reflection SEAL it with your peers - High Five Peer Mentoring Programme journal collecting the daily impressions of mentees and mentors. The at St. Gregorys Catholic High School experience as a whole will produce a set of guidelines/recommendations Peer mentoring has been an intrinsic part of the ethos at St. Gregorys for for career development agencies. many years. The last OFSTED (Office for Standards in Education, Childrens Services and Skills) inspection (Jan 2007) judged personal development and 8. Brunel University Mentoring Programmes wellbeing as outstanding and specifically cited the example of older Ethnic Minority Students are offered professional mentors as part of the students selflessly giving up their mornings and acting as mentors to Year 718This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 19 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 12. students in English and Mathematics. The High Five peer mentoring As part of integrating the peer mentoring programme into the school anti programme is directed at enhancing the social-emotional environmental bullying policy, Lyndsey saw anti bullying week (17-21 Nov 2008) as an ideal factors that influence learning, promoting a climate that is caring, safe and platform to raise awareness of the peer mentors as a force to tackle bullying supportive. at St. Gregorys. During anti bullying week peer mentors went out into the playground and into assemblies with giant lollipops to promote peer The seed was planted for a peer mentoring project that focused on pupils in mentoring. transition when specialist teacher Lyndsey Granton found that a lot of vulnerable Year 7 pupils were waiting outside her room in the morning with Good practice highlighted by the project problems relating to being in a new environment. Sometimes there were so Lyndsey has found working towards the Approved Provider Standard (APS) many pupils that she would not get chance to talk to them all about their a useful tool for giving her project a renewed direction and increasing her worries and the children began sharing and solving their problems. This was motivation to ensure the project is continuously improving. She has the moment when Lyndsey realised that peer mentoring could make a successfully used the Pupil Attitudes to Self and School (PASS) significant contribution to the transition of pupils at St. Gregorys. questionnaire programme to measure the outcomes of her project relating to wellbeing. After being successfully established in 2007-2008, St. Gregorys peer mentoring programme joined the national peer mentoring anti bullying St. Gregorys also has an external mentoring programme in which pilot. The pilot is being run by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation successful professionals are engaged from outside the school to mentor (MBF) in 150 primary, secondary and special schools throughout England pupils. Inclusion Manager Wendy Dolphin has worked to ensure the from 2008-2010. mentoring and peer mentoring projects compliment each other and embed the concept of mentoring within the school ethos. Many of the Recruitment and Selection pupils recruited to be peer mentors have a better understanding of what When setting up the peer mentoring programme, Lyndsey started out mentoring involves from experiencing adult mentors within their school. recruiting a manageable group of 10 peer mentors working mostly on an informal drop-in basis. This has now developed into a team of 25 young people who are trained over two days and focus on SEAL (Social and 10. The model of The European Mentoring and Coaching Emotional Aspects of Learning) targets with their mentees each week. Council: European Quality Award Selecting potential mentees is a four stage process at St. Gregorys: BT ETHNIC MINORITY NETWORK E-MENTORING PROGRAMME 1. The transition manager identifies pupils from feeder primary schools The BT Ethnic Minority Network (EMN), is a proactive, employee based, self help 2. Pupils who are not coping effectively with the transition from primary to group which is run by a small group of dedicated people over and above their very secondary are identified from the school SEN register busy day jobs. The EMN has grown into one of the largest company sponsored 3. The Head of Year 7 identifies pupils who have demonstrated poor networks of its kind in the world, since its inception 7 years ago, with thousands of organisation in the first half-term and who have not adjusted well to the members world-wide. secondary school environment 4. A drop-in service allows year 7s to deposit appointment cards for peer The EMN was established to encourage greater diversity throughout BT and help support bring significant commercial, community and individual benefits to BT and its pe-20This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 21 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 13. ople. The network has a key role to play in persuading, advising and guiding II. North American Mentoring Practices individuals of the effective promotion of racial equality. The Network contributes to the creation of a level playing field for all BTs people and 1. The mentoring experience of Big Brothers Big Sisters influences decisions in the areas of Recruitment Policy, Personal Big Brothers Big Sisters is the oldest, largest and most effective youth Development and Training. mentoring organization in the United States. They have been the leader in one-to-one youth service for more than a century, developing positive The EMN vision is to become the leading company sponsored network in relationships that have a direct and lasting impact on the lives of young the world. Its mission is to develop and encourage BTs ethnic community to people. Big Brothers Big Sisters mentors children, ages 6 through 18, in achieve their full potential, whilst supporting BT in the pursuit of its global communities across the country. aspirations. 10.1 Community-based Mentoring – For as little as an hour a week, Bigs The EMN E-Mentoring Programme has been set-up to provide a global and Littles meet in their community to share fun activities … stories … and a reach and enhance the capabilities of its traditional Mentoring Programme little bit of themselves. which, aims to develop individuals and help them discover their capabilities, understand the culture of the organisation, remove barriers, Community-based Mentoring is the traditional Big Brothers Big Sisters break the glass ceiling, enhance their careers and achieve their full relationship. Its all about one-on-one time spent with the volunteer and potential. the young person doing things they enjoy — a few hours a couple times a month filled with shared interests and activities like: Over the years the traditional Mentoring Programme has grown significantly with Mentors being recruited from across the organisation in Shooting hoops the UK, with varying knowledge, experience and cultural backgrounds. The Playing a board game net result has been the production of numerous role models, higher Sharing a pizza aspirations, increased motivation, better cultural awareness and improved attainment. The aim of the E-Mentoring Programme is to achieve similar Taking a walk in the park results but on a global basis. Or just hanging out and talking. The E-Mentoring Programme will work alongside the traditional programme and provide the much needed global reach by overcoming the The schedule can be flexible to meet the needs of mentors and young people in barriers of distance and time. Mentors and Mentees will span the globe and different kinds of situations. Some Bigs meet their Littles on the weekend or in the will be made up of people from BT, its Joint Ventures and Strategic Global evening. Others get together with their Littles after school. Theres almost no one Partners. so busy that they cant find a way to fit in a few hours a month, especially When They Learn What a Difference Mentoring Makes. The programme aims to build on the success of the existing scheme, which National and state statistics show that children who are mentored are more likely is highly respected within BT and is recognised as a leader in its field to improve in school and in their relationships with family and peers, and less likely externally by other organisations. to skip school or use illegal drugs or alcohol. Students who are successful in school The E-Mentoring Programme has got off to a flying start and has already attracted are less likely to drop out, become pregnant, abuse drugs or become involved in people on to the scheme from across the UK, Italy, the Netherlands and the USA. criminal activity. The success of children who are mentored is apparent in the fol-22This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 23 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 14. lowing statistics. In a nationwide study, Little Brothers and Little Sisters lities from diverse multicultural backgrounds. were: 2.1 Individual/Group Programmes: 52% less likely to skip school 2.1.1 Mentor Match Programme (MM) 46% less likely to begin using illegal drugs MM was founded in 1985 and intents to inspire young people to develop More likely to get along with their families and peers their talents and abilities by means of an adult role model who has encountered similar frustrations and experienced success. The Mentor 10.2 School-based Mentoring - Bigs and Littles meet once a week in Match program offers three types of mentoring options to better schools, libraries and community centers, to talk and have fun. accommodate busy schedules and geographic distance: Face-to-Face Mentor Match: For youth aged 6-24, mentors and Kids enjoy School-Based Mentoring. And parents know what a difference it mentees agree to a 1 year commitment and see each other once per makes. But some of the biggest supporters of School-Based Mentoring are month, and phone/contact once per week. actually teachers. They see students come back from their one hour a week mentoring sessions with confident smiles, ready to learn and ready to Youth who wish to be matched with a mentor are interviewed by a PYD staff succeed. person to better understand their interests and needs, in order to find the Kids Who Feel Better About Themselves Do Better in School. best match. Adult mentors undergo a thorough screening process that School-Based Mentoring is not a classroom program, and its not tutoring. includes an interview, criminal history and reference check. Participants are School-Based Mentoring is one-to-one mentoring that takes place in the matched according to a variety of factors, including similar disability, schools. Of course, some students do talk with their mentors about class, or common interests, career aspirations, hobbies and geographical proximity. do homework, or read together, but its really all about friendship and In addition to one-to-one contact, mentors attend mandatory group guidance. They can play or jump rope or shoot hoops — whatever the training sessions and individuals are also encouraged to participate in fun mentor and the student enjoy. Bigs dont need any special training or group outings sponsored by PYD once every three months. certification. 2.1.2 Partners Online Programme (POL) 2. Partners for Youth with Disabilities - Mentoring programs Partners Online was created to enable youth and adults with disabilities to that assist young people to reach their full potential (Boston) share resources, advice and encouragement through mentoring PYD is a pioneer in its delivery of unique mentoring services for youth with relationships made possible with technology. Partners Online offers a disabilities. In addition to its core one-to-one Mentor Match Program, PYD secure online community with forums and chat rooms and much more. offers multiple innovative and effective group and educational programs Youth who are 14-24 have access to forums and weekly chats that bring that build skills in the areas of independent living, self-advocacy, them together with other youth throughout Massachusetts as well as entrepreneurship and career development and provide opportunities for Mentors, who can offer much needed advice. Forums and Chats cover socialization, leadership, community service, healthy living and topics from independent living to sports to managing stress. Our forums are participation in the arts. All of these programs provide role models who public and open to guests by signing on as a Youth Guest. An application has share their own stories and inspire young people to gain confidence to face to be submitted to access all the discussion forums, chat rooms, mail and their futures. Programs and events are accessible to individuals with disabi- talk with other participants.24This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 25 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 15. 2.2 Education/Training Programmes: largest national cross-disability membership organization in the United 2.2.1 Peer Leadership Program (PL) States, DMD connects nearly 20,000 job-seekers with disabilities with thousands of employers in more than 300 locations in every U.S. State and This programme is founded in 1998 and is targeted at 16-24-year-old Territory and in more than 24 countries worldwide each year. Over 2,000 people. Peer Leaders participate in training sessions that feature team participating public and private employers hosted mentees at their places building activities, skill development and panel discussions on topics such of employment, with many continuing the mentoring relationships for as leadership, conflict resolution, effective communication, advocacy, long-term periods. disability awareness and independent living. All Peer Leaders learn the value of community service and contribute a significant amount of time to PYD programs and outside projects that will have a meaningful impact on III. Australian Mentoring Practices the community. As inspirational youth leaders, Peer Leaders emulate the 1. Graduate Careers Australia role modeling mission pioneered by PYDs adult mentors. Graduate Careers Australia (GCA) is the leading authority on graduate employment issues in Australia. They use this position to foster 3. The mentoring experience of American Association for employment and career opportunities for graduates, in association with People with Disabilities (AAPD) the higher education sector, government and business. AAPDs Disability Mentoring Day (DMD) Program is a national job-shadow Willing and Able Mentoring (WAM) Program and career exploration program designed to link students and jobseekers with disabilities to employers interested in hiring people with disabilities. The Willing and Able Mentoring (WAM) Program matches job seekers or AAPD coordinates DMD national through a network of more than 350 tertiary students who have a disability with Mentors in leading volunteer DMD Coordinators. DMD Coordinators are responsible for local organisations in the job seekers/students field of interest for a series of DMD programs and share information about their programs on the approximately eight one to two-hour discussion meetings. During these DisabilityMentor.Net. meetings strategies focused on are: DMD is recognized nationally on the third Wednesday of every October, Gathering information about the career environment they are National Disability Employment Awareness Month. AAPD encourages our heading towards network of DMD Coordinators to center their local DMD activities around Refining interview skills this date; however DMD activities can and do occur around the country on Experiencing the workplace culture (eg. staff meetings) many different dates. Developing better skills in presenting a professional profile Disability Mentoring Day (DMD) is a large-scale national effort to promote Disclosure and demistifying disability and related workplace issues (eg. career development for students and job seekers with disabilities through workplace modifications) hands-on career exploration, on-site job shadowing, and ongoing The WAM Program was established through collaboration between Deakin mentoring leading to internship and employment opportunities. University and the University of Melbourne in 2000. WAM is now available Hosted by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the across Australia for any job seeker or tertiary student who has a disability on26This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 27 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 16. a fee service basis. As we can see from the above described mentoring models there are The premise underlying the WAM Program is that people who have a different types of support and training. Despite the variations there are disability, despite being as talented as their peers, are often overlooked in some common issues that could be addressed to each mentoring the fierce competition for career opportunities due to negative self- programme that aims at providing high quality model of mentoring concepts, community stereotypes and general negative beliefs or support. They could be structured as follows: assumptions about their ability. The preparation phase is crucial for the success of the mentoring programme itself. Sometimes the improper matching or the sketchy WAM has the potential to reduce those negative beliefs, and enhance research of the target groups needs could fail the programme. That is why personal/professional strategies (eg. networking skills) to assist people the mentoring experts recommend clear and in-depth research of all who have a disability become more competitive in that challenging requirements and expectations that mentors and mentees could have. transition from study to career. Other benefits, which may flow from the WAM concept, include more Individual mentoring relationships will generally take place within general positive cultural compliance and development in the workplace overall programmes, co-ordinated by a central agency or individual (the and clarification of essential requirements of job roles in the workplace. promoter). The promoter will normally provide essential support for the individual mentoring partnerships, for example in recruitment and training, The WAM applicants must be available for a training workshop, the six to including advice in the development of mentoring agreements. But the eight mentor sessions at the mentors workplace, and a debriefing and promoter should not take on any of the tasks that should be discharged by certificate presentation event at the end of the program. the mentor and mentee. To do so will undermine the shared responsibility The WAM Program has now been documented and analysed as the focus of that is an essential requirement of successful mentoring. PhD research by the WAM Program Coordinator, Kevin Murfitt. The PhD research supported the evaluations from hundreds of WAM participants. Mentoring is not easy. Whatever their experience and however Mentees gain significantly in their confidence, clarity of career direction, genuine their commitment, both mentors and mentees will require professional profile, and strategies to make their workplaces more systematic and comprehensive training programmes. Furthermore, the inclusive. duration of the programme will make a considerable call on their commitment – typically mentoring programmes last for a period of months and will involve regular, frequent, meetings. Conclusion Nor is mentoring without potential risk. Given that it is a close, even The mentoring practices examples in this report show the extensiveness of intimate, relationship the opportunity for manipulation and exploitation of the mentoring in the USA and its spreading throughout Europe. As a one party by the other is always a real, if unusual, possibility. response to the age of knowledge that seized the business world, mentoring has gone to a great transformation. Now it is more orientated towards the development of the individuals inner power and their For more information about the described mentoring programmes see the attributes. Appendix 1 with the relevant websites.28This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with 29 support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  • 17. Appendix 1 Project titles and web-addresses 1. Validation of Mentoring www.mentoring-validation.org 2. Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development www.cipd.co.uk 3. Access to Professional Training project www.apt-leonardo.org 4. Women in Job Creation project www.percorsodonna.it/wojob 5. Peer Mentor Support Project http://www.academic.salford.ac.uk/peer_support 6. Empowerment through Mentoring to Promote the Importance of Real Work Experience project http://www.empire-leonardo.org 7. Brunel University Mentoring Programmes http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/facts/access/mentoring.bspx 8. Mentoring and Befriending Foundation www.mandbf.org.uk 9. The European Mentoring and Coaching Council: European Quality Award www.coachingnetwork.org.uk 10. Big Brothers, Big Sisters www.bbbsa.org 11. Partners for Youth with Disabilities http://www.pyd.org/mentoring_programs/index.htm 12. American Association for People with Disabilities www.aapd.com 13. Graduate Careers Australia http://www.graduatecareers.com.au/content/view/full/31830This report is developed as a result of WP2 of the M-NET EOP project which has been funded with support from the European Commission. It reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.