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Writing Workshop
 

Writing Workshop

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A writing workshop presented to college peers that covers the most common errors in essays, including topics such as quote integration, MLA format, thesis statements, organization, etc.

A writing workshop presented to college peers that covers the most common errors in essays, including topics such as quote integration, MLA format, thesis statements, organization, etc.

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    Writing Workshop Writing Workshop Presentation Transcript

    • Thursday, March 3, 2011 12:45-1:45 p.m. TC 201Molly Sharbaugh and Marissa Burdett
    •  Broad to narrow Thesis Statements Condense Brief source summary Quotations Example
    •  Provide a claim or insight Transitions Connect to the thesis in a distinctively different (but related!) way Help organize the paper
    •  Example: Columbus was an explorer in the 1400s. • Revised: Travel has changed since the days of Columbus. Example: People waste time • Revised: Some pass time moving from one incomplete task to another, spending too little time with loved ones, investing too little time in physical and mental self-improvement, and treading water financially.
    •  Transitions/Topic Sentence • Place a strong sentence at the end of a paragraph. • Many Westerners dont like rivers in the East. They are alarmed by the muddy water, the overhanging trees, and the snakes. Some Easterners arent too thrilled about Western rivers, either. • Western rivers can seem shallow, freezing cold, too exposed to the sun, rocky, and uninviting to someone used to the gentle and fertile rivers of the East.
    •  Transitions/Topic Sentences • Make an allusion to the topic of the preceding paragraph. • Many Westerners dont like rivers in the East. They are alarmed by the muddy water, the overhanging trees, and the snakes. Westerners often wont stick their big toes in rivers that look like the James. • To Easterners, on the other hand, Western rivers can seem shallow, freezing cold, too exposed to the sun, rocky, and uninviting. . .
    •  Logical fallacies Evidence- Quotations or Paraphrasing Multiple points Quick summary/transition
    •  Citethe author in either the sentence or in the parenthesis: • In John Smith’s novel, Apples, Sally states that “Apples are delicious” (334). • In the novel, Apples, Sally states that “Apples are delicious” (Smith 334).
    •  Long quotations Integration Examples
    •  The men in Stephen Cranes short story, "The Open Boat," are courageous; they want to live. "The idealistic virtues of bravery, fortitude, and integrity possess no meaning in a universe that denies the importance of man" (Stein 151). The ideals of their native environment, then, mean little when confronted with the harshness of the open ocean. These men finally realize that it is possible they will die.
    •  The men in Stephen Cranes short story, "The Open Boat," are courageous; they want to live. As critic William Bysshe Stein points out, however, "the idealistic virtues of bravery, fortitude, and integrity possess no meaning in a universe that denies the importance of man" (151). The ideals of their native environment, then, mean little when confronted with the harshness of the open ocean. These men finally realize that it is possible they will die.
    •  Bad vs. Good • BAD: She writes that experience “I believe experience invites or compels the reader’s belief in the story and the veracity of the narrator” (27). • GOOD: She states, “I believe experience invites or compels…” (27).
    •  YOUR voice Larger picture New conclusions/points Example
    •  Use formal language. Avoid using “you,” “we,” and “us.” Use “I” sparingly. Don’t say “this” without saying what “this” is. When discussing literature, keep your writing in the present tense. Come to the Learning Center!
    •  Library Handbook • Westminster Library Handbook Homepage MLA and APA Help; Subject Specific Resources • Purdue OWL Chicago Style Help • Chicago Manual of Style Grammar Advice and Practice • Dailygrammar.com Helpful Tips on the Writing Process • University of Richmond’s Writer’s Web