AIGA -- Design for An Exploding World -- Oct 22, 2009
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AIGA -- Design for An Exploding World -- Oct 22, 2009

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"Design For An Exploding World" Presentation from the AIGA "Small Talks: Big Ideas" Lecture Series on October 22, 2009.

"Design For An Exploding World" Presentation from the AIGA "Small Talks: Big Ideas" Lecture Series on October 22, 2009.
http://aigasf.org/events/2009/10/22/small_talks_big_ideas_razorfish

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  • ALTERNATE SLIDE IDEA
  • Snapple: quirky, fun, unexpected, trickster Cultural significance = momentary amusement, a treat – chance discovery. Adventure into exotic, foreign lands

AIGA -- Design for An Exploding World -- Oct 22, 2009 AIGA -- Design for An Exploding World -- Oct 22, 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • Design for an Exploding World Find Your Meaning, Dig the Data & Adapt Page © 2008 Razorfish. All rights reserved. AIGA “Small Talks, Big Ideas” – San Jose State University 10/22/2009 Razorfish -- Marisa Gallagher, VP User Experience
    • CHAOS
    • The designer's world has entered a constant state of change.
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  •  
  •  
  • Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
    • Dealing with the Chaos:
    • 1. FIND – your meaning to the world
    • 2. DIG – into the data to know more
    • 3. ADAPT – get on with it and learn
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
    • 1. FIND (your meaning)
    • Your brand means something, even if your advertising doesn’t.
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • What Does Your Brand Mean to Your Customer?
    • Questions to Ask:
    • What is its cultural significance?
    • Does it represent any archetype or icon?
    • Why do your customers like it, love it, fear it, hate it, use it?
    • What does it say about them – in what context do they use it?
    • What is its “shared shorthand”?
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • First -- Go Broad Explore the cultural archetypes and concepts related to a product category or larger industry. Create mood boards and word lists of what you find. Then – Get Specific Do a competitive audit of how others are using archetypes and cultural elements. Look for holes, gaps, and saturation points. Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved. How to Use The Questions?
  • Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved. Beverage Culture in Pictures . . .
  • Page © 2008 Razorfish. All rights reserved. Beverage Culture in Words . . .
  • Coke: “Click-snap, Ahhhhhhhh.” Branding the sound of refreshment. Competitive Audit
  • Snapple: “We found better stuff!” Purveyors of momentary, exotic amusement and chance discovery. Competitive Audit
  • Y water: a “new” concept in children’s beverages. A magic potion is a special bottle to transform our kids and the industry. Competitive Audit
    • 2. DIG (into the data)
    • Become channel fluent.
    • Know how and where to reach your audience.
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved. Old Media Is Maimed, Not Dead
  • Yet, Choose Your Channel Wisely Mass + Passive Channels COMMUNICATION Personal + Interactive Channels PARTICIPATION immersive storytelling location specific ritual, socializing, familiarity connected, tailored, dynamic striking play Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved. Americans under 45 spend more time online than with other media Internet Know How To Reach Your Audience
  • Europeans over 25 like TV more than the Web, those over 45 like both radio and TV more than the Web Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved. Internet Another Good Starting Point . . .
  • And Keep on Digging . . . Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
    • Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
    And Digging . . . Qualitative Research Quantitative Research Good at:
    • Context, human texture, semantics, subjectivity
    • Definitive conclusions, clear measures, objectivity
    Typical set-up:
    • Often in person, observation and discussion-oriented, even with task completion
    • Often remote, test plan structured around clear objective responses without ambiguity (yes/no, multiple choice, success/failure)
    Provides:
    • The why, why not, where not, when not
    • The what, how much, when, where
    Downfall:
    • Directionality can be skewed by sample size, personalities
    • Can be looking at the wrong measures.
    Sample Size
    • 8-12 provide directionality/patterns
    • 100+ (technically 30, but numbers normalize better above 100)
    Examples
    • Ethnographic studies
    • One-on-one interviews
    • Lab-style usability tests
    • Focus groups
    • Card sorting (in person)
    • Mouse-and-click-path tracking
    • Multivariate testing
    • Self-directed remote usability testing
    • Analytics + search log tracking
    • Surveys
    • Card sorting (remote)
    • 3. ADAPT (and learn)
    • Put it out there (and listen) before it puts you out of business.
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • Get the Feedback Loop Going
  • Get Your Advocates Energized
  • Just Do It, Even if You’re Not Nike
  • Go Cheap: Don’t Build, Don’t Buy
  • Get Responsive Before It’s Too Late
    • Dealing with the Chaos:
    • 1. FIND – your meaning to the world
    • 2. DIG – into the data to know more
    • 3. ADAPT – get on with it and learn
    Page © 2009 Razorfish. All rights reserved.
  • Thank You
    • Razorfish
    • Marisa Gallagher, VP User Experience
    • [email_address] twitter.com/marisagallagher
    Page © 2008 Razorfish. All rights reserved.