Governors State University
College of Education - Division of Psychology & Counseling
Course Syllabus
FALL 2010
PSYC 440 S...
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.2
2 | P a g e
9. model the high standards of respect and integrity expected in the field of psychol...
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.3
3 | P a g e
Course Evaluation & Grading
Area Points
Required Orientation 10
Reaction Papers (3) 9...
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.4
4 | P a g e
Coordinator of ASSD in Room B1201 in person; by e-mail, assd@govst.edu; or by calling...
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.5
5 | P a g e
Wozniak, R. H. RENÉ DESCARTES AND THE LEGACY OF MIND/BODY DUALISM
[click "continue" t...
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.6
6 | P a g e
Week 9:Some influential and less well-known psychologists: Non-representative case ex...
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.7
7 | P a g e
Week 14 and 15 - Final Exam available and DUE
PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.8
8 | P a g e
Additional Research Resources
http://pages.slu.edu/faculty/josephme/resguides/psyhist...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

syllabus - GOVERNORS STATE UNIVERSITY

453 views
365 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
453
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

syllabus - GOVERNORS STATE UNIVERSITY

  1. 1. Governors State University College of Education - Division of Psychology & Counseling Course Syllabus FALL 2010 PSYC 440 SA History and Systems ONLINE Credit Hrs: 3 (Graduate & Undergraduate) Office Location: G396 Instructor: Crystal Harris Blount, MA Office Phone: (708) 235-7569 E-mail: c-blount@govst.edu Office Hrs: TH 1 – 4 pm Governors State UniversityMission Governors State University is committed to offering an exceptional and accessible education that imbues students with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to succeed in a global society. GSU is dedicated to creating an intellectually stimulating public square, serving as an economic catalyst for the region, and being a model of diversity and responsible citizenship. Catalog Course Description Surveys major theories of psychology and their relationship to current professional practices. Focuses upon understanding and comparing the origin and development of different psychological perspectives in terms of metatheoretical issues. Course Prerequisites: PSYC 310 or equivalents. Rationale: Students pursuing careers in Psychology are well served by viewing the problems currently being considered by psychology as manifestations of centuries old problems, that is, problems that have been studied by some of the greatest minds in human history. A knowledge base of understanding of the history of psychology provides the solid foundation for choosing an individual theoretical framework from among the systems presented to the student for consideration. Professional identity with a system or systems will influence the student’s future academic/ career experience and performance in psychology and the liberal arts. The knowledge of the history and systems of psychology will facilitate entry into the work force in many careers or in post baccalaureate education, or both. Required Text : Goodwin, C. J. (2005). A history of modern psychology, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. (ISBN: 978-0-470-12912-8) Course Objectives: Upon successfully completing this course, the student should be able to: (related APA goal) 1. characterize the nature of the history and systems of psychology as a vital foundation required to appreciate the science of psychology. (1.1, 1.2) 2. use the concepts, language and major theories of the systems of psychology to account for psychological phenomena being researched and analyzed today. (1.3) 3. explain the major perspectives of psychology including behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural. (1.4) 4. evaluate historical psychology concepts, theories, and research findings as they relate to past and present everyday life. (3.1) 5. demonstrate reasonable skepticism and intellectual curiosity by asking questions about the historical arguments and other persuasive appeals of past and present theorists. (3.3, 5.2) 6. demonstrate sensitivity in recognizing and respecting human diversity both in the past and in the present. The student will understand that psychological explanations are often complex and may vary across generations and populations.(5.5) 7. demonstrate effective communication skills in using the above knowledge. (7.1, 7.2) 8. use appropriate software to produce understandable papers on psychology topics studied utilizing APA format. (6.2)
  2. 2. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.2 2 | P a g e 9. model the high standards of respect and integrity expected in the field of psychology within the classroom learning environment and in a diverse community. (8.1, 9.4) Instructional activities The course consists of readings in both the textbook and supplemental material, online group work, and writing assignments called reaction papers. Online participation is required weekly, and you should expect to spend at least 1-2 hours per week on the readings. Reliable internet access is also required as well as access and knowledge of basic Microsoft Office software to upload and download materials. Required Orientation There will be a required Online Orientation Session during weeks 1 and 2 through Wimba Live Online Classroom. In this session, you will learn the technical skills needed in this course. If you have had other online courses at GSU, then you may take an online exam BEFORE the Session, and will NOT be required to attend. Article Reaction Papers (3 – 30 points each) These papers are 3 pages in length. You will summarize the reading on the first page, and write a critical reflection of the reading integrating it with other key terms and concepts in the textbook or answering specific questions outlined in the assignment instructions. Appropriate attention to grammar, punctuation and writing style is very important. Exams (2- 50 pts each) There will be two exams: a midterm exam and a final. The links to both of these will be online for 7 days. Each exam consists of multiple choice questions. You will have 3 hours to complete each exam. You are allowed to refer to your book, but there is NOT sufficient time to look up many of the questions and finish within the allotted time frame. You must thoroughly read and take notes prior to logging to begin the exams. Research Project Presentation presented on WIMBA Live. Each student will design a PowerPoint presentation that combines online and multimedia content to present critical analysis of a specific person or event in the history of psychology. Most students select a favorite theory or pioneer from the course to examine throughout the semester. Your audience for this project consists of both your peers in this class and other professional psychologists. Support your insights into the history of psychology with research evidence regardless of your topic or chosen medium. The length expected is 14 -16 slides narrated or approx 20 minutes. Your outline and topic must be approved by the instructor. Also, please use concepts from the textbook and course readings and integrate them into either project. You must use 3 outside credible references to support your project. You may use any source listed in the references for your text or search for a different source in a professional database such as PSYCINFO. Online sources from the web sites listed below are acceptable but most items found using commercially available search engines (e.g., Yahoo, Google) are not. *Due dates are updated regularly on WebCT at the discretion of the Instructor. Please read announcements carefully on WebCT.
  3. 3. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.3 3 | P a g e Course Evaluation & Grading Area Points Required Orientation 10 Reaction Papers (3) 90 Midterm Exam 75 Final Exam 75 Research Project 50 TOTAL 300 pts. Scale A: 90-100% of total points B: 80-89% of total points C: 70-79% of total points D: 60-69% of total points F: 59% or less of total points Course Policies Late or Missed Assignments: All assignment links are available for 7 days prior to the date due, and then 72 hours after the date due (considered “Late”). Any assignment marked late after the date posted on the course website (WebCT) will be assessed a 50% penalty. There will be no extensions beyond the period already set in WebCT. Your failure to complete or upload an assignment before the link expires is NOT sufficient reason for an extension. Please do NOT request that any link be reset for any reason. Do NOT email an assignment directly to me unless I have specifically given you permission to do so. Assignments emailed to me will be penalized by one grade letter (or 20%) even if they are on time. Incomplete (I) Grades: The only students who will be eligible for an Incomplete (I) are those who are passing the course at the time of the request AND have sent appropriate documentation of a medical emergency to the instructor prior to the request. Academic Honesty: Papers that contain plagiarized material will be given a grade of zero and you will fail the course. Students who engage in plagiarism may be subject to disciplinary action. See student handbook. The following acts are examples of plagiarism: 1. Handing in an assignment that someone else has written and claiming the work as your own. 2. Handing in an assignment that contains sections, paragraphs, sentences or key phrases that someone else has written without documenting the source(s) for each portion of the assignment not written by you. 3. Handing in an assignment that incorrectly cites secondary sources rather than primary sources (e.g. if you read something in a textbook and they cite the original source you either need to go read the original source or cite the primary source as "as cited in" and then put the secondary source). 4. Handing in an assignment that contains paraphrased ideas from another source, published or unpublished, without documenting the source for each paraphrase. (Changing around a few words in a sentence from the source is not sufficient to avoid plagiarism.) 5. "Someone else" in the three statements above may refer to a published author, another student, an Internet source, or any person other than the student claiming credit for the assignment. Even if the work is by the same author the document being turned in, if the work was for a previous or other course, it should be documented as such. 6. “Documenting" means providing the name of the author, the source you have used, and other relevant bibliographical information such as addresses for web sites used as sources. If you do not know how to document sources within your paper, please refer to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 5th Edition. 7. Note that the APA 6th edition is the ultimate authority on APA style. Special Needs: GSU is committed to providing all students equal access to all university programs and facilities. Students who have a documented physical, psychological, or learning disability and need academic accommodations, must register with Access Services for Students with Disabilities (ASSD). Please contact the
  4. 4. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.4 4 | P a g e Coordinator of ASSD in Room B1201 in person; by e-mail, assd@govst.edu; or by calling 708.235.3968. If you are already registered, please contact your instructor privately regarding your academic accommodations. *The course due dues are updated regularly on WebCT at the discretion of the Instructor. Please read announcements carefully on WebCT. Topical Class schedule Weeks 1  Orientation to the Course  Post your Introduction & read your classmates’ posts. Week 2 Why study history? Contextualizing the history of psychology Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 1: Introducing Psychology's History Scarborough, E., & Furumoto, L. (1987). Introduction to Untold lives: The first generation of American women psychologists (pp. 1-13). NY: Columbia University Press. Winston, A.S. (2004). Introduction: Histories of psychology and race. In A.S. Winston (Ed.), Race, racism, and the history of psychology (pp. 3-18), Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Week 3 Philosophical underpinnings Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 2: The Philosophical Context What have people thought about the nature of the mind, the relationship of the mind to the body, what it means to be human? How have these ideas influenced what is now psychology? Primary source e-texts in the history of psychology http://www.usca.edu/psychology/history/ancient.html Pick ONE from among the first set of sources listed in this site and skim your selection (i.e. the Torah, Confucius, or Hippocrates). Write down at least 3 brief quotations to illustrate how these texts represent something about human nature, or some other concept that is of interest to psychologists, and post this for discussion with the rest of the class on your blog. Week 4 Descartes and his influence
  5. 5. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.5 5 | P a g e Wozniak, R. H. RENÉ DESCARTES AND THE LEGACY OF MIND/BODY DUALISM [click "continue" to get through 3 of these mini-chapters] The transformation from philosophy to psychology… Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 3: The Neurophysiological Context Gardner, H. (2001, March 9). The philosophy-science continuum. The Chronicle of Higher Education, vol 47, issue 26, p. B7-B10. Week 5 (First Reaction Paper Due) Psychology’s start in the United States – William James Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 6: American Pioneers Weeks 6 - Midterm Exam available Weeks 7 The dominant systems in psychology Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 7: Structuralism and Functionalism Calkins, M. W. (1906). A reconciliation between structural and functional psychology. Psychological Review, 13, 61-81 Week 8 (Second Reaction Paper Due) Gestalt Psychology and Psychoanalysis Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 8: Applying the New Psychology Hornstein, G. A. (1992). The return of the repressed: Psychology’s problematic relations with psychoanalysis, 1909-1960. American Psychologist, 47, 254-263.
  6. 6. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.6 6 | P a g e Week 9:Some influential and less well-known psychologists: Non-representative case examples… Bringmann, W. G., Bringmann, M. W., & Early, C. E. (1992). G. Stanley Hall and the history of psychology. American Psychologist, 47, 281-289. Guthrie, R. V. (1976). Francis Cecil Sumner – Father of black American psychologists. In R. V. Guthrie, Even the rat was white: A historical view of psychology (1st Edition) (pp. 175-189). NY: Harper & Row. Scarborough, E., & Furumoto, L. (1987). The quest for graduate education: Mary Calkins’ contest with Harvard University. In Scarborough & Furumoto, Untold lives: The first generation of American women psychologists. NY: Columbia University Press. Triplet, R. G. (1992). Henry A. Murray: The making of a psychologist? American Psychologist, 47, 299-307. Third Reaction Paper Due Some things to think about while reading the above articles: Are there parallels in any of these life stories? What do you notice about the institutions these psychologists were affiliated with? What role did historical events play? Economics? Discrimination? What distinguishes the life stories from one another? Weeks 10 (Research Project Approval): Ideas and lives of influential psychologists Lives and ideas #2 – B. F. Skinner Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 10: The Origins of Behaviorism Skinner, B. F. (1978). The experimental analysis of behavior (A history). In B. F. Skinner, Reflections on behaviorism and society (pp. 113-126). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Excerpt from B.F. Skinner (1948/1976) Walden Two. Prentice-Hall Weeks 11: Carl Rogers Kirschenbaum, H. (2004). Carl Rogers’ life and work: An assessment on the 100th anniversary of his birth. Journal of Counseling & Development., 82, 116-124. [available full-text online via Macalester library website] Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 13: Psychology's Practitioners Weeks 12: Critical perspectives on the discipline; focus on measurement (and mismeasurement) Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 12: Mental Illness and its Treatment Strickland, B. R. (2000). Misassumptions, misadventures, and the misuse of psychology. American Psychologist, 55, 331-338. Week 13: Towards the future of psychology Goodwin, C. J. (2005). Chapter 15: Linking Psychology's Past and Present Jackson, J. (2000). What ought psychology to do? American Psychologist, 55, 328-330 Week 14 - Research Project Presentations
  7. 7. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.7 7 | P a g e Week 14 and 15 - Final Exam available and DUE
  8. 8. PSYC 440 Winter 2010 p.8 8 | P a g e Additional Research Resources http://pages.slu.edu/faculty/josephme/resguides/psyhist.html – Resource guide for history of psych http://www.psych.yorku.ca/orgs/resource.htm – History and philosophy of psych web resources http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/Mind/Table.html – History of psychology from Descartes to William James http://www.ecsu.ctstateu.edu/personal/faculty/kornfeld/frames.htm – unofficial Schultz and Schultz history of psych homepage (based on a very widely used history of psych textbook) Primary source websites http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/ – Classics in the History of Psychology homepage – links to original articles http://www.usca.edu/psychology/history/histor~1.html – Primary source e-texts in the history of psychology (ancient times, Medieval times, Renaissance, early 20th C) People http://www.emory.edu/EDUCATION/mfp/james.html – William James website http://plaza.interport.net/nypsan/freudarc.html – Sigmund Freud archives homepage http://www.webster.edu/~woolflm/women.html – Women in the history of the social sciences *The course due dues are updated regularly on WebCT at the discretion of the Instructor. Please read announcements carefully on WebCT.

×